gravitation

noun

grav·​i·​ta·​tion ˌgra-və-ˈtā-shən How to pronounce gravitation (audio)
1
: a force manifested by acceleration toward each other of two free material particles or bodies or of radiant-energy quanta : gravity sense 3a(2)
2
: the action or process of gravitating
gravitational adjective
gravitationally adverb
gravitative adjective

Examples of gravitation in a Sentence

the gravitation of young people to computer careers
Recent Examples on the Web Sergey Radchenko, a historian at Johns Hopkins University, comes from the East Asian island of Sakhalin, a good place from which to detect geopolitical gravitations. John Lewis Gaddis, Foreign Affairs, 7 June 2024 With the average age in Africa being 18.8 years, there's a natural gravitation towards novel financial systems like bitcoin, which offers solutions to challenges such as high banking fees and insufficient infrastructure. Susie Violet Ward, Forbes, 1 Mar. 2024 And of course that observation was central to the formulation of Kepler’s laws, which together with Galileo’s study of pendula and falling bodies, all this led to the pinnacle of the scientific revolution: Newton’s formulation of classical mechanics and the laws of gravitation. Quanta Magazine, 29 Feb. 2024 As Feud implies, this may have influenced his gravitation to the swans, as well as his willingness to betray them. Cady Lang, TIME, 2 Feb. 2024 The exceedingly thin atmosphere on Mars is offset, slightly, by the reduction of gravitation force. Eric Berger, Ars Technica, 29 Jan. 2024 Such thinking has animated much of the enterprise of physics ever since Isaac Newton formulated his laws of universal gravitation in 1687: one set of laws for both the heavens and the earth. Adam Frank, Discover Magazine, 12 July 2023 Staying true to her gravitation toward unconventional, casual styles and a love for the aviator silhouette, Diana preferred to have fun with sunglasses while guarding herself from more than just UV rays. Megan O'Sullivan, Vogue, 16 Nov. 2023 For example, there’s Newton’s law of universal gravitation, which was a major revolutionary step in our understanding not just of gravity, but of the physics of the wider universe. Paul M. Sutter, Discover Magazine, 5 Dec. 2023

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'gravitation.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

First Known Use

circa 1645, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of gravitation was circa 1645

Dictionary Entries Near gravitation

Cite this Entry

“Gravitation.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/gravitation. Accessed 17 Jun. 2024.

Kids Definition

gravitation

noun
grav·​i·​ta·​tion ˌgrav-ə-ˈtā-shən How to pronounce gravitation (audio)
1
: a force of attraction that tends to draw particles or bodies together : gravity sense 3b
2
: the action or process of gravitating
gravitational
-shnəl How to pronounce gravitation (audio)
-shən-ᵊl
adjective
gravitationally
adverb
gravitative adjective

Medical Definition

gravitation

noun
grav·​i·​ta·​tion ˌgrav-ə-ˈtā-shən How to pronounce gravitation (audio)
: a force manifested by acceleration toward each other of two free material particles or bodies or of radiant-energy quanta as if they were particles (as in the bending of rays of starlight passing close to the sun) : an attraction between two bodies that is proportional to the product of their masses, inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them, and independent of their chemical nature or physical state and of intervening matter
gravitational adjective
gravitationally adverb

More from Merriam-Webster on gravitation

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