gravitate

verb
grav·​i·​tate | \ ˈgra-və-ˌtāt How to pronounce gravitate (audio) \
gravitated; gravitating

Definition of gravitate

intransitive verb

1 : to move under the influence of gravitation
2a : to move toward something
b : to be drawn or attracted especially by natural inclination youngsters … gravitate toward a strong leader— Rose Friedman

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Did You Know?

English has several weighty words descended from the Latin gravitas, meaning "weight." The first to arrive on the scene was "gravity," which appeared in the early 16th century. (Originally meaning "dignity or sobriety of bearing," it quickly came to mean "weight" as well.) Next came "gravitation" (used to describe the force of gravity) and "gravitate" - both mid-17th century arrivals. "Gravitate" once meant "to apply weight or pressure," but that use is now obsolete. In the late 17th century, it was recorded in the sense "to move under the effect of gravitation." It then acquired a more general sense of "to move toward something" (as toward a specific location), and finally a metaphorical third sense of "to be attracted" (as toward a person or a vocation).

Examples of gravitate in a Sentence

The guests gravitated toward the far side of the room. The conversation gravitated to politics. Voters have started gravitating to him as a possible candidate. Many young people now gravitate toward careers in the computer industry.
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Recent Examples on the Web

This hair type tends to get oily and greasy pretty quickly, as the oils at your root gravitate down the hair shaft. Yerin Kim, Seventeen, "This Is How Often You Should Really Be Washing Your Hair," 12 Apr. 2019 The wife craved the aesthetic of her native Japan, while the Midwestern husband gravitated toward Danish modern furniture—unusually compatible ingredients. Catherine Romano, WSJ, "House Tour: A Chic Zen Home in the Woods," 22 Mar. 2019 Because so many athletes gravitate to the position, depth has been great at receiver over the last few years, and that makes this year an anomaly. Albert Breer, SI.com, "NFL Draft Quarterback Class: The Holes, the Hype and How the Combine Performances Will Factor," 1 Mar. 2018 The five-hour discussion often gravitated toward technical and arcane items. Ledyard King, USA TODAY, "Remade under Scott Pruitt, EPA's Science Advisory Board includes more industry-friendly voices," 1 June 2018 Seattle’s underground music and arts culture gravitates to this LGBTQ-friendly venue. Jenna Scatena, Condé Nast Traveler, "15 Best Things to Do in Seattle," 16 May 2018 Those with natal planets in the Seventh House tend to be very focused on relationships, gravitating towards partnership in all areas of life. Aliza Kelly Faragher, Allure, "The 12 Astrological Houses: Interpreting Your Birth Chart Beyond the Zodiac," 6 Oct. 2018 But even before Doja Cat captured everyone’s interest with her off-the-cuff video, brands like Casadei and Manolo Blahnik started to gravitate towards the bold pattern. Madeline Fass, Vogue, "Love It or Hate It, Cow Print Is Here to Stay—Shop These 13 Farm-Inspired Pieces," 4 Oct. 2018 His following is gigantic and people are going to gravitate to his charisma and his natural, creative way of communication. Michelle R. Martinelli, For The Win, "Grading Dale Earnhardt Jr.'s first NASCAR race broadcasts," 11 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'gravitate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of gravitate

1692, in the meaning defined at sense 1

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Statistics for gravitate

Last Updated

23 Apr 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for gravitate

The first known use of gravitate was in 1692

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More Definitions for gravitate

gravitate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of gravitate

: to move or tend to move to or toward someone or something
: to be attracted to or toward something or someone

gravitate

verb
grav·​i·​tate | \ ˈgra-və-ˌtāt How to pronounce gravitate (audio) \
gravitated; gravitating

Kids Definition of gravitate

: to move or be drawn toward something

gravitate

intransitive verb
grav·​i·​tate | \ ˈgrav-ə-ˌtāt How to pronounce gravitate (audio) \
gravitated; gravitating

Medical Definition of gravitate

: to move under the influence of gravitation

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More from Merriam-Webster on gravitate

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with gravitate

Spanish Central: Translation of gravitate

Nglish: Translation of gravitate for Spanish Speakers

Comments on gravitate

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