gravitate

verb
grav·​i·​tate | \ ˈgra-və-ˌtāt How to pronounce gravitate (audio) \
gravitated; gravitating

Definition of gravitate

intransitive verb

1 : to move under the influence of gravitation
2a : to move toward something
b : to be drawn or attracted especially by natural inclination youngsters … gravitate toward a strong leader— Rose Friedman

Did you know?

English has several weighty words descended from the Latin gravitas, meaning "weight." The first to arrive on the scene was "gravity," which appeared in the early 16th century. (Originally meaning "dignity or sobriety of bearing," it quickly came to mean "weight" as well.) Next came "gravitation" (used to describe the force of gravity) and "gravitate" - both mid-17th century arrivals. "Gravitate" once meant "to apply weight or pressure," but that use is now obsolete. In the late 17th century, it was recorded in the sense "to move under the effect of gravitation." It then acquired a more general sense of "to move toward something" (as toward a specific location), and finally a metaphorical third sense of "to be attracted" (as toward a person or a vocation).

Examples of gravitate in a Sentence

The guests gravitated toward the far side of the room. The conversation gravitated to politics. Voters have started gravitating to him as a possible candidate. Many young people now gravitate toward careers in the computer industry.
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Recent Examples on the Web With limited time to recruit, coaches gravitate towards the elite prep circuits and games between state championship contenders ripe with talent. Theo Mackie, The Arizona Republic, 28 Dec. 2021 Our job is what people with strong principles gravitate towards. Kayla Rivas, Fox News, 24 Aug. 2021 Where other Hollywood stars will gravitate towards sleek, streamlined dresses for their premieres, Carter goes for theatricality, and a dash of camp. Christian Allaire, Vogue, 26 May 2021 While adult walleye pollock are averse to super cold water, juveniles are known to gravitate to the interior of the cold pool. Susanne Rust, Anchorage Daily News, 26 Dec. 2021 While adult walleye pollock are averse to super cold water, juveniles are known to gravitate to the interior of the cold pool. Los Angeles Times, 17 Dec. 2021 Gordon Gough, president and CEO of the retail organization, said consumers seemed to gravitate towards products and away from services in 2020 due to the pandemic. Sean Mcdonnell, cleveland, 23 Nov. 2021 Some animals even seemed to gravitate toward certain vents. Elizabeth Gamillo, Smithsonian Magazine, 22 Nov. 2021 But redistricting by state Republicans places him in a toss-up district with a smaller share of Black voters who were likelier to gravitate to his campaign. Bryan Anderson, USA TODAY, 19 Nov. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'gravitate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of gravitate

1692, in the meaning defined at sense 1

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Time Traveler for gravitate

Time Traveler

The first known use of gravitate was in 1692

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Dictionary Entries Near gravitate

gravitas

gravitate

gravitater

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Statistics for gravitate

Last Updated

15 Jan 2022

Cite this Entry

“Gravitate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/gravitate. Accessed 18 Jan. 2022.

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More Definitions for gravitate

gravitate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of gravitate

: to move or tend to move to or toward someone or something
: to be attracted to or toward something or someone

gravitate

verb
grav·​i·​tate | \ ˈgra-və-ˌtāt How to pronounce gravitate (audio) \
gravitated; gravitating

Kids Definition of gravitate

: to move or be drawn toward something

gravitate

intransitive verb
grav·​i·​tate | \ ˈgrav-ə-ˌtāt How to pronounce gravitate (audio) \
gravitated; gravitating

Medical Definition of gravitate

: to move under the influence of gravitation

More from Merriam-Webster on gravitate

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for gravitate

Nglish: Translation of gravitate for Spanish Speakers

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