gravitate

verb
grav·​i·​tate | \ ˈgra-və-ˌtāt \
gravitated; gravitating

Definition of gravitate

intransitive verb

1 : to move under the influence of gravitation
2a : to move toward something
b : to be drawn or attracted especially by natural inclination youngsters … gravitate toward a strong leader— Rose Friedman

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Did You Know?

English has several weighty words descended from the Latin gravitas, meaning "weight." The first to arrive on the scene was "gravity," which appeared in the early 16th century. (Originally meaning "dignity or sobriety of bearing," it quickly came to mean "weight" as well.) Next came "gravitation" (used to describe the force of gravity) and "gravitate" - both mid-17th century arrivals. "Gravitate" once meant "to apply weight or pressure," but that use is now obsolete. In the late 17th century, it was recorded in the sense "to move under the effect of gravitation." It then acquired a more general sense of "to move toward something" (as toward a specific location), and finally a metaphorical third sense of "to be attracted" (as toward a person or a vocation).

Examples of gravitate in a Sentence

The guests gravitated toward the far side of the room. The conversation gravitated to politics. Voters have started gravitating to him as a possible candidate. Many young people now gravitate toward careers in the computer industry.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Your presence exudes playfulness and people gravitate towards your youthful energy. Ashley Otero, Teen Vogue, "Who You Should Date, Based on Your Horoscope," 20 Aug. 2018 People have gravitated around him, friends connected by friends across fields of creativity. Sarah Mower, Vogue, "Telfar Takes Over London’s Serpentine Gallery," 13 Aug. 2018 The question is, what do the people gravitate toward the most? Juan Vidal, Billboard, "Lecrae on New Album 'Let the Trap Say Amen' & The True Heart of the South," 19 June 2018 Re: Girls-Only Playdate: My 5th-grade boy has always gravitated to playing with girls. Carolyn Hax, The Seattle Times, "Excluding boy, mom from playground fun rated ‘terrible’," 15 Oct. 2018 Rather than fumbling with two or more monitors, Dell is hoping more people will gravitate to the single, gigantic-monitor experience. Valentina Palladino, Ars Technica, "Dell’s newest monitor is a 49-inch, dual QHD, curved behemoth," 15 Oct. 2018 One of the items students most gravitate toward are the yearbooks. Emily K. Coleman, Lake County News-Sun, "Waukegan High School local history class designed for students who are 'itching to know their city'," 14 June 2018 What Woods did not realize until the place opened in August 2015 was that other star golfers would gravitate toward The Woods. Michael Rosenberg, SI.com, "Inside The Woods, Tiger's Star-Studded Restaurant in Jupiter," 12 June 2018 Many will also gravitate toward HP's suite of security features that includes programs that users will appreciate and a few that workplace IT professionals will require. Valentina Palladino, Ars Technica, "HP Elitebook x360 1030 review: Small tweaks made to a stylish work 2-in-1," 16 Nov. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'gravitate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of gravitate

1692, in the meaning defined at sense 1

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Statistics for gravitate

Last Updated

15 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for gravitate

The first known use of gravitate was in 1692

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More Definitions for gravitate

gravitate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of gravitate

: to move or tend to move to or toward someone or something

: to be attracted to or toward something or someone

gravitate

verb
grav·​i·​tate | \ ˈgra-və-ˌtāt \
gravitated; gravitating

Kids Definition of gravitate

: to move or be drawn toward something

gravitate

intransitive verb
grav·​i·​tate | \ ˈgrav-ə-ˌtāt \
gravitated; gravitating

Medical Definition of gravitate

: to move under the influence of gravitation

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More from Merriam-Webster on gravitate

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with gravitate

Spanish Central: Translation of gravitate

Nglish: Translation of gravitate for Spanish Speakers

Comments on gravitate

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