glia

noun
\ ˈglē-ə How to pronounce glia (audio) , ˈglī-ə How to pronounce glia (audio) \
plural glia

Definition of glia

: supporting tissue intermingled with the essential elements of nervous tissue especially in the brain, spinal cord, and ganglia

Examples of glia in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web But how can myelinating glia detect neural impulses flowing through axons? R. Douglas Fields, Scientific American, "The Brain Learns in Unexpected Ways," 12 Mar. 2020 Many different cellular changes could expand gray matter volume, including the birth of new neurons and of nonneuronal cells called glia. R. Douglas Fields, Scientific American, "The Brain Learns in Unexpected Ways," 12 Mar. 2020 Many autism risk genes appeared in progenitor cells, whereas schizophrenia genes were more active later—in glia and inhibitory neurons, for instance. Simon Makin, Scientific American, "“Organoids” Reveal How Human Forebrain Develops," 24 Jan. 2020 Far from being mere valets to neurons, glia often take leading roles in protecting the brain’s health and directing its development. Quanta Magazine, "Glial Brain Cells, Long in Neurons’ Shadow, Reveal Hidden Powers," 27 Jan. 2020 But when the researchers examined more precise subtypes of cells—a subset cells known as outer radial glia, for example—the comparisons started to break down. Kelly Servick, Science | AAAS, "Lab-grown ‘minibrains’ differ from the real thing in cell subtypes, gene expression," 29 Jan. 2020 From there, the organoids develop automatically, first generating different types of neurons and then forming other brain cells called glia. Simon Makin, Scientific American, "“Organoids” Reveal How Human Forebrain Develops," 24 Jan. 2020 Instead other types of brain cells, called glia, are responsible. R. Douglas Fields, Scientific American, "Deeper Insights Emerge into How Memories Form," 18 Nov. 2019 The new theory postulates that establishing indelible memories that can be recalled long after sensory input or training on a task involves an interaction between glia and peculiar brain waves produced during sleep. R. Douglas Fields, Scientific American, "Deeper Insights Emerge into How Memories Form," 18 Nov. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'glia.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of glia

1891, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for glia

New Latin, from Middle Greek, glue — more at clay

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Last Updated

15 Jun 2020

Cite this Entry

“Glia.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/glia. Accessed 10 Aug. 2020.

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More Definitions for glia

glia

noun
\ ˈglē-ə How to pronounce glia (audio) , ˈglī-ə How to pronounce glia (audio) \
plural glia

Medical Definition of glia

: supporting tissue that is intermingled with the essential elements of nervous tissue especially in the brain, spinal cord, and ganglia, is either of ectodermal or mesodermal origin, and is composed of a network of fine fibrils and of flattened stellate cells with numerous radiating fibrillar processes — see macroglia, microglia

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