gerbera

noun
ger·​bera | \ ˈgər-bə-rə How to pronounce gerbera (audio) , ˈjər- \

Definition of gerbera

: any of a genus (Gerbera) of Asian and African composite herbs that have basal tufted leaves and are often cultivated for their showy heads of yellow, pink, or orange flowers with prominent rays

Examples of gerbera in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Common houseplants such as pothos, gerbera daisy and peace lily have the added benefit of being great indoor air filters as well. Kirby Adams, The Courier-Journal, "Here's why you should 'make friends with nature' and get to planting a coronavirus garden," 7 Apr. 2020 While Colombia and Ecuador dominate the market for bouquet mainstays such as carnations, chrysanthemums, gerbera and roses, California growers shifted to species that can’t be grown in the cool upland valleys of the Andes. Geoffrey Mohan, Los Angeles Times, "Coronavirus hit California’s cut-flower industry at the worst time," 4 Apr. 2020 Divide and replant perennials including shasta daises, gerbera, bromeliads and many bulbs. Tom Maccubbin, OrlandoSentinel.com, "July in the garden," 30 June 2018 These insects have rasping, sucking mouth parts that also damage gardenia, gerbera and chrysanthemum blooms. Tom Maccubbin, OrlandoSentinel.com, "Poor root system hinders plant growth," 19 May 2018 Divide and replant perennials including shasta daises, gerbera, bromeliads and many bulbs. Tom Maccubbin, OrlandoSentinel.com, "July in the garden," 30 June 2018 Flowers were the crowning glory, with some models wearing helmets of fresh gerberas, hydrangeas and orchids on their heads. Rhonda Richford, The Hollywood Reporter, "Valentino's Magical Couture Week Closer Leaves Tracee Ellis Ross in Tears," 5 July 2018 As the students did their duty, eight of their peers, also clad in their Delbarton uniforms, stood by, holding white lilies and gerbera daisies. Peggy Wright, USA TODAY, "Baby boy abandoned at recycling center is laid to rest by students," 19 Dec. 2017 Perennials that keep producing after cutting include campanula, dahlia, gerbera daisies, evergreen penstemon, phygelius, agastache and salvia. Ciscoe Morris, The Seattle Times, "Plant a cutting garden that can sustain regular picking — and possibly your relationship," 12 July 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'gerbera.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of gerbera

1889, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for gerbera

New Latin, from Traugott Gerber †1743 German naturalist

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Time Traveler for gerbera

Time Traveler

The first known use of gerbera was in 1889

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Cite this Entry

“Gerbera.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/gerbera. Accessed 20 Jan. 2021.

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