ganache

noun
ga·​nache | \ (ˌ)gä-ˈnäsh How to pronounce ganache (audio) , gə- \

Definition of ganache

: a sweet creamy chocolate mixture used especially as a filling or frosting

Examples of ganache in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web The versions might include something chunky, a ribbon of caramel, a layer of ganache on top, even a gumball at the bottom. Bon Appétit, 19 Apr. 2022 To make the ganache: In a heatproof bowl placed over a pan of simmering water, pour the heavy cream, chocolate chips and coffee. Susan Selasky, Detroit Free Press, 13 Feb. 2022 Once cool, the cookies are paired together with fillings like jam, fruit curd, chocolate ganache, or buttercream. Kate Kassin, Bon Appétit, 15 Apr. 2022 Very gently press the crushed malt balls and caramelized crunchies into the ganache. Tribune News Service, cleveland, 12 Apr. 2022 The Black and White dessert reigned equally artistic, an intoxicating array of flourless cake, white chocolate mousse, salt-and-pepper ganache, anisette cream and chocolate soil that expressed all of chocolate’s many moods. Mike Sutter, San Antonio Express-News, 7 Apr. 2022 While your marshmallow fluff is whipping, make the ganache. Washington Post, 1 Dec. 2021 Peanut Butter Dacquoise dessert bursts with flavor thanks to a peanut chocolate praline crunch made with Girl Scout Tagalongs, peanut butter mousse, chocolate ganache and a milk foam. Priscilla Totiyapungprasert, The Arizona Republic, 30 Jan. 2022 This year’s version of the treat is made with chocolate macaron cookies, filled with caramel ganache and Snickers candy bar pieces and topped with nuts and chocolate glaze. Pam Kragen, San Diego Union-Tribune, 8 Mar. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'ganache.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of ganache

1977, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for ganache

borrowed from French, originally a kind of bonbon manufactured by the Parisian confectioner Siraudin (probably after Les Ganaches, a play by Victorien sardou first performed in October, 1862), literally, "lower jaw of a horse, jowl, imbecile," borrowed from Italian (Tuscan) ganascia "jaw, jowl," central Italian ganassa, going back to Vulgar Latin (northern and central Italy) *ganassa, re-formation (with gender conformed to the source noun) of Greek gnȧthos "jaw" (attested in Medieval Latin of Italy as ganathos) — more at -gnathous

Note: The French word occurs in a list of bonbon varieties produced by "la maison Siraudin" ("Courrier de la mode," LʼIllustration, journal universel, vol. 44, no. 1139, 24 décembre 1864, p. 415): "Les bonbons preférés sont: le Maltais, la Praline du club, la Praline Livry, au sucre de violette, lʼÉmélie, lʼOrangine, puis les Ganaches, qui eurent presque le succès de la pièce de Victorien Sardou, etc., etc." ("The preferred bonbons are: the Maltese, the Club Praline, the Praline Livry, with violet sugar, the Émélie, the Orangine, then the Ganaches, which had nearly the success of Victorien Sardouʼs play, etc., etc."). The Ganache bonbon is cited in English in a list of popular French bonbons, others of which are named after successful operas and plays of the period ("Bonbons," Every Saturday: A Journal of Choice Reading, vol. 7, nol. 163, February 13, 1869, pp. 220-21).

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The first known use of ganache was in 1977

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Last Updated

21 May 2022

Cite this Entry

“Ganache.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ganache. Accessed 1 Jul. 2022.

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Nglish: Translation of ganache for Spanish Speakers

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