fog

1 of 2

noun

ˈfȯg How to pronounce fog (audio)
fäg
1
a
: vapor condensed to fine particles of water suspended in the lower atmosphere that differs from cloud only in being near the ground
b
: a fine spray or a foam for firefighting
2
: a murky condition of the atmosphere or a substance causing it
3
a
: a state of confusion or bewilderment
spent the morning in a fog
b
: something that confuses or obscures
hid behind a fog of rhetoric
4
: cloudiness or partial opacity in a developed photographic image caused by chemical action or stray radiation
fogless
ˈfȯg-ləs How to pronounce fog (audio)
ˈfäg-
adjective

fog

2 of 2

verb

fogged; fogging

transitive verb

1
: to cover, envelop, or suffuse with or as if with fog
fog the barns with pesticide
2
: to make obscure or confusing
accusations which fogged the real issues
3
: to make confused
4
: to produce fog on (something, such as a photographic film) during development

intransitive verb

1
: to become covered or thick with fog
2
a
: to become blurred by a covering of fog or mist
b
: to become indistinct through exposure to light or radiation

Example Sentences

Noun Heavy fog made it difficult to see the road. a climate marked by heavy fogs The fog reduced visibility to a quarter of a mile. This problem has me in a fog. Verb The steam from the pot was fogging the window near the stove. The bathroom was all fogged up after my shower. politicians who try to fog the issue instead of taking a stand See More
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
The first notable passing play for the Bruins came with 6:09 remaining in the fourth quarter, just moments after the fog lifted. Daniel Gibel, cleveland, 11 Nov. 2022 The weather service said some fog will be possible later tonight for parts of the state. Leigh Morgan, al, 31 Oct. 2022 In Napa County, patchy dense fog is possible until 9 a.m. Highs will reach the mid-60s for Napa. Michelle Apon, San Francisco Chronicle, 31 Oct. 2022 Eventually the fog lifted enough for the game to continue. Houston Mitchell, Los Angeles Times, 7 Oct. 2022 The Facebook account went dark and the fog finally lifted. John Keilman, Chicago Tribune, 5 Oct. 2022 Some patchy fog is possible, too, under constant cloudiness. Matt Rogers, Washington Post, 4 Oct. 2022 Brain fog isn’t like a hangover, depression, or ADHD. Ed Yong, The Atlantic, 12 Sep. 2022 At five-twenty-four, the fog was suddenly perceptible against the black dunes. Ben Taub, The New Yorker, 16 May 2022
Verb
Ask a scientist to explain why the California coast experiences fog in the summer, and the answer will come in paragraphs, not mere words. John Branch, New York Times, 14 Sep. 2022 People who wear glasses can also gauge if their mask is leaky by how much their lenses fog up, Cappa said. Allyson Chiu, Washington Post, 12 Feb. 2021 Bring an extra lens on a powder day—it’ll come in handy if the first one starts to fog or the light goes flat. Joe Jackson, Outside Online, 30 Jan. 2015 The days at Kavic ran together, the weather never sitting still, cycling from snow to fog to rain to the midnight sun casting 50-foot shadows across the gravel. Josh Condon, Robb Report, 6 Aug. 2022 Hunched over their synthesizers enshrouded in a swirl of light, color, and fog on another stage, Rüfüs Du Sol were nonetheless more animated. Marc Hirsh, BostonGlobe.com, 28 May 2022 As we got sloshed about in the whitecaps, my goggles started to fog and the brackish water rinsed my throat. Ross Kenneth Urken, Travel + Leisure, 8 June 2022 In a pool there’s nothing much to look at once the goggles fog over. Bonnie Tsui, Outside Online, 10 Apr. 2020 For the weekend, cooling onshore winds will create a coastal eddy, spinning low clouds and fog inland during nights and mornings in a typical seasonal pattern, with temperatures ranging from the high 60s to mid-70s along the coast. Los Angeles Times, 4 June 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'fog.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

Word History

Etymology

Noun

probably back-formation from foggy

First Known Use

Noun

1544, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

circa 1592, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of fog was in 1544

Dictionary Entries Near fog

Cite this Entry

“Fog.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/fog. Accessed 29 Nov. 2022.

Kids Definition

fog 1 of 2

noun

ˈfȯg How to pronounce fog (audio)
ˈfäg
1
a
: fine particles of water floating in the atmosphere near the ground
b
: a fine spray or a foam for firefighting
2
: a gloomy condition of the atmosphere or a substance causing it
3
: a state of mental confusion
spent the morning in a fog

fog

2 of 2

verb

fogged; fogging
1
: to cover or become covered with or as if with fog
2
: to make confused

Medical Definition

fogged; fogging
: to blur (a visual field) with lenses that prevent a sharp focus in order to relax accommodation before testing vision

More from Merriam-Webster on fog

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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