flavonoid

noun
fla·​vo·​noid | \ ˈflā-və-ˌnȯid How to pronounce flavonoid (audio) \

Definition of flavonoid

: any of a large group of typically biologically active water-soluble plant compounds (such as the anthocyanins and flavones) that include pigments ranging in color from yellow to red to blue and occur especially in fruits, vegetables, and herbs (such as grapes, citrus fruits, peppers, and dill) Flavonoids are effective scavengers of free radicals in the test tube (in vitro). However, even with very high flavonoid intakes, plasma and intracellular flavonoid concentrations in humans are likely to be 100 to 1000 times lower than concentrations of other antioxidants …— Jane Higdon The rich palette of dyes in butterflies' wings are all derived from chemicals called flavonoids, which the insects cannot make themselves and must sequester from their food plants.— Nicholas Wade — see bioflavonoid

Examples of flavonoid in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Tea contains large quantities of flavonoids, plant pigments that have been shown in animal and human studies to moderate oxidative and inflammatory stress and improve the function of blood vessels. Nicholas Bakalar, New York Times, "Do Tea Drinkers Live Longer?," 2 Apr. 2020 Honey also contains trace amounts of vitamins, minerals, and flavonoids, and is known for its antimicrobial and antibacterial benefits. Stefani Sassos, Ms, Rdn, Cso, Good Housekeeping, "Is Coconut Sugar Healthy? Here's Everything You Need to Know, According to Our Nutritionist," 19 Mar. 2020 The biochemical composition of flavonols (part of a larger antioxidant class known as flavonoids) appears to enable them to quell inflammation and to scavenge free radicals in the blood and the gut to help prevent cellular damage. Gary Stix, Scientific American, "What’s in Kale (or a Pear) that Seems to Lower Alzheimer’s Risk?," 30 Jan. 2020 In population studies, people who frequently drink unsweetened green tea are less likely to develop cardiovascular disease later in life; this 2013 review published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition tied the benefit to tea's flavonoids. Zee Krstic, Good Housekeeping, "These Are Green Tea's Most Exciting Health Benefits, According to a Nutritionist," 6 Jan. 2020 Pears provide beneficial phytonutrients Pears, especially those with colorful skins, provide phytonutrients, or natural plant chemicals, like flavonoids. Julie Upton, Health.com, "Pear Nutrition: 5 Ways This Fruit Can Boost Your Health," 24 Oct. 2019 Quercetin, a flavonoid found in celery, has been shown to combat both acute and chronic inflammation, and is linked to protection against neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's. Cynthia Sass, Mph, Health.com, "Health Benefits of Celery," 12 Dec. 2019 There is an entourage effect in cannabis where the different cannabinoids, flavonoids, terpenes and other compounds play off and increase each other’s therapeutic effects and values. Mary Schumacher, chicagotribune.com, "Cannabis, Alzheimer’s and hope are on the horizon," 2 Aug. 2019 Plants also contain a variety of phytochemicals—bioactive compounds including flavonoids, carotenoids, and polyphenols that, some studies suggest, may be linked to lower risk of chronic diseases like cancer and cardiovascular disease. Carolyn L. Todd, SELF, "Does It Make a Difference if You Get Your Protein from Plants or Animals?," 28 Aug. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'flavonoid.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of flavonoid

1947, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for flavonoid

flavone + -oid

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Time Traveler for flavonoid

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The first known use of flavonoid was in 1947

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Last Updated

13 Apr 2020

Cite this Entry

“Flavonoid.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/flavonoid. Accessed 29 May. 2020.

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More Definitions for flavonoid

flavonoid

adjective
fla·​vo·​noid | \ ˈflāv-ə-ˌnȯid How to pronounce flavonoid (audio) , ˈflav- How to pronounce flavonoid (audio) \

Medical Definition of flavonoid

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: of, relating to, or being a flavonoid

flavonoid

noun

Medical Definition of flavonoid (Entry 2 of 2)

: any of a large group of typically biologically active, water-soluble, plant compounds (such as the flavones) that include pigments ranging in color from yellow to red to blue and occur especially in fruits, vegetables, and herbs (such as grapes, citrus fruits, peppers, and dill) Tea contains substances called catechins (tea flavonoids) that may protect against heart disease and even cancer.UC Berkeley Wellness Newsletter, November 1999 Flavonoids are effective scavengers of free radicals in the test tube (in vitro). However, even with very high flavonoid intakes, plasma and intracellular flavonoid concentrations in humans are likely to be 100 to 1000 times lower than concentrations of other antioxidants …— Jane Higdon, An Evidence-Based Approach to Dietary Phytochemicals, 2007

Note: Flavonoids are polyphenolic 15-carbon compounds with a basic structure consisting of two benzene rings joined by a chain of 3 carbons.

— see bioflavonoid

More from Merriam-Webster on flavonoid

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with flavonoid

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about flavonoid

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