flavonoid

noun
fla·​vo·​noid | \ ˈflā-və-ˌnȯid How to pronounce flavonoid (audio) \

Definition of flavonoid

: any of a large group of typically biologically active water-soluble plant compounds (such as the anthocyanins and flavones) that include pigments ranging in color from yellow to red to blue and occur especially in fruits, vegetables, and herbs (such as grapes, citrus fruits, peppers, and dill) Flavonoids are effective scavengers of free radicals in the test tube (in vitro). However, even with very high flavonoid intakes, plasma and intracellular flavonoid concentrations in humans are likely to be 100 to 1000 times lower than concentrations of other antioxidants …— Jane Higdon The rich palette of dyes in butterflies' wings are all derived from chemicals called flavonoids, which the insects cannot make themselves and must sequester from their food plants.— Nicholas Wade — see bioflavonoid

Examples of flavonoid in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Raw apples contain a flavonoid called quercetin, which boosts immune system function. Angela Watson, chicagotribune.com, "Foods that boost the immune system," 27 Mar. 2021 Unprocessed cocoa powder contains high levels of flavanol, a common type of flavonoid. Angela Watson, chicagotribune.com, "Health benefits of cocoa powder," 22 Mar. 2021 Cherries, in particular, are among the top picks due to their ample anthocyanins (a flavonoid that lends a red or purple tint to plant foods) and other antioxidants that may improve blood flow and potentially reduce pain, Auslander Moreno adds. Karla Walsh, Better Homes & Gardens, "5 Foods to Avoid if You Have Arthritis (and 5 That Might Help), According to Dietitians," 15 June 2020 Eating foods high in flavonoids — a group of nutrients found in many fruits and vegetables — may lower your risk for dementia, researchers report. Nicholas Bakalar, New York Times, "The Foods That May Lower Dementia Risk," 19 May 2020 Tea contains large quantities of flavonoids, plant pigments that have been shown in animal and human studies to moderate oxidative and inflammatory stress and improve the function of blood vessels. Nicholas Bakalar, New York Times, "Do Tea Drinkers Live Longer?," 2 Apr. 2020 Honey also contains trace amounts of vitamins, minerals, and flavonoids, and is known for its antimicrobial and antibacterial benefits. Stefani Sassos, Ms, Rdn, Cso, Good Housekeeping, "Is Coconut Sugar Healthy? Here's Everything You Need to Know, According to Our Nutritionist," 19 Mar. 2020 The biochemical composition of flavonols (part of a larger antioxidant class known as flavonoids) appears to enable them to quell inflammation and to scavenge free radicals in the blood and the gut to help prevent cellular damage. Gary Stix, Scientific American, "What’s in Kale (or a Pear) that Seems to Lower Alzheimer’s Risk?," 30 Jan. 2020 In population studies, people who frequently drink unsweetened green tea are less likely to develop cardiovascular disease later in life; this 2013 review published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition tied the benefit to tea's flavonoids. Zee Krstic, Good Housekeeping, "These Are Green Tea's Most Exciting Health Benefits, According to a Nutritionist," 6 Jan. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'flavonoid.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of flavonoid

1947, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for flavonoid

flavone + -oid

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Time Traveler for flavonoid

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The first known use of flavonoid was in 1947

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Statistics for flavonoid

Last Updated

6 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Flavonoid.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/flavonoid. Accessed 6 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for flavonoid

flavonoid

adjective
fla·​vo·​noid | \ ˈflāv-ə-ˌnȯid How to pronounce flavonoid (audio) , ˈflav- How to pronounce flavonoid (audio) \

Medical Definition of flavonoid

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: of, relating to, or being a flavonoid

flavonoid

noun

Medical Definition of flavonoid (Entry 2 of 2)

: any of a large group of typically biologically active, water-soluble, plant compounds (such as the flavones) that include pigments ranging in color from yellow to red to blue and occur especially in fruits, vegetables, and herbs (such as grapes, citrus fruits, peppers, and dill) Tea contains substances called catechins (tea flavonoids) that may protect against heart disease and even cancer.UC Berkeley Wellness Newsletter, November 1999 Flavonoids are effective scavengers of free radicals in the test tube (in vitro). However, even with very high flavonoid intakes, plasma and intracellular flavonoid concentrations in humans are likely to be 100 to 1000 times lower than concentrations of other antioxidants …— Jane Higdon, An Evidence-Based Approach to Dietary Phytochemicals, 2007

Note: Flavonoids are polyphenolic 15-carbon compounds with a basic structure consisting of two benzene rings joined by a chain of 3 carbons.

— see bioflavonoid

More from Merriam-Webster on flavonoid

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about flavonoid

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