flamboyant

adjective
flam·​boy·​ant | \flam-ˈbȯi-ənt \

Definition of flamboyant 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : marked by or given to strikingly elaborate or colorful display or behavior a flamboyant performer

2 often capitalized : characterized by waving curves suggesting flames flamboyant tracery flamboyant architecture

flamboyant

noun

Definition of flamboyant (Entry 2 of 2)

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Other Words from flamboyant

Adjective

flamboyantly adverb

Did You Know?

Adjective

Flamboyant, which was borrowed into English from French in the 19th century, can be traced back to Old French flambe, meaning "flame." In its earliest uses flamboyant referred to a style of architecture, often in the florid French Gothic style, which featured waving curves that suggested flames. Eventually, the word developed a more general second sense for anything eye-catching or showy. As you have no doubt guessed, Old French flambe is also the origin of the English adjective flambé.

Examples of flamboyant in a Sentence

Adjective

Crazy artists, or flamboyant ones, can be strangely comforting. We feel we understand where their visions come from; we're lulled by the symmetry of turbulent art and turbulent lives. — Stephen Schiff, New Yorker, 28 Dec. 1992–4 Jan. 1993 Equally flamboyant is the group's singer, Andy Bell, who prances around the stage dressed at various times like an astronaut, a space creature or a Mexican senorita. — Jim Farber, Video Review, August 1990 … he was living in the flamboyant, urbane manner he craved, in an apartment that suited his Balzacian fantasies of success … — Raymond Sokolov, Wayward Reporter, 1980 the flamboyant gestures of the conductor has a gallery of flamboyant gestures that makes him easy to imitate
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective

Of course, quitting social media in flamboyant fashion has long been a popular activity for government and non-government users alike. Casey Newton, The Verge, "Facebook’s problems in Europe are piling up," 21 Sep. 2018 Ponti’s designs, often flamboyant, revived the historic company and raised his own profile. Alice Cavanagh, WSJ, "Explore the Genius of Italian Architect Gio Ponti," 18 Aug. 2018 The flamboyant lawyer with 2020 presidential aspirations shared on Twitter another email to Davis outlining his requests for the committee, followed by a tweet touting a court appearance with Daniels later in the day. Emily Stewart, Vox, "What does Michael Avenatti have on Brett Kavanaugh? What we know so far.," 24 Sep. 2018 The rooms are flamboyant, old-school glamour, either facing the sea or the mountains. Jane Broughton, Condé Nast Traveler, "16 Best Hotels in Cape Town," 14 Sep. 2018 Political hustle: Ever since the flamboyant venture capitalist stepped back from his gig, Sacca began using his time to cultivate a crop of startups and political groups and recommend the best to his network across Silicon Valley and Hollywood. Theodore Schleifer, Recode, "Ten big Silicon Valley money players behind this November’s U.S. midterm elections," 20 Aug. 2018 Holmes' non-flamboyant fashion sense has managed to help her keep a low profile in crowded places, like riding the New York City trains completely undetected. Marina Liao, Marie Claire, "Katie Holmes' Chloé​ Ballet Flats Are the Most Versatile Shoes Around," 3 Aug. 2018 When the state’s most flamboyant businessman knocks out his principal regulator in broad daylight, word has a tendency to get around. Richard E. Farley, Town & Country, "The Great American Racetrack War," 9 June 2017 The British royal family may prefer a subtle genuflection, but events like debutante balls offer occasions for a more flamboyant curtsy like the Texas Dip. Malia Wollan, New York Times, "How to Curtsy," 9 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'flamboyant.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of flamboyant

Adjective

1832, in the meaning defined at sense 2

Noun

1879, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for flamboyant

Adjective

French, from present participle of flamboyer to flame, from Old French, from flambe

Noun

see flamboyant entry 1

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Statistics for flamboyant

Last Updated

4 Dec 2018

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Time Traveler for flamboyant

The first known use of flamboyant was in 1832

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More Definitions for flamboyant

flamboyant

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of flamboyant

: having a very noticeable quality that attracts a lot of attention

flamboyant

adjective
flam·​boy·​ant | \flam-ˈbȯi-ənt \

Kids Definition of flamboyant

: having a noticeable or showy quality

Other Words from flamboyant

flamboyantly adverb

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