flamboyant

adjective
flam·​boy·​ant | \ flam-ˈbȯi-ənt How to pronounce flamboyant (audio) \

Definition of flamboyant

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : marked by or given to strikingly elaborate or colorful display or behavior a flamboyant performer
2 often capitalized : characterized by waving curves suggesting flames flamboyant tracery flamboyant architecture

flamboyant

noun

Definition of flamboyant (Entry 2 of 2)

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Other Words from flamboyant

Adjective

flamboyantly adverb

Did You Know?

Adjective

Flamboyant, which was borrowed into English from French in the 19th century, can be traced back to Old French flambe, meaning "flame." In its earliest uses flamboyant referred to a style of architecture, often in the florid French Gothic style, which featured waving curves that suggested flames. Eventually, the word developed a more general second sense for anything eye-catching or showy. As you have no doubt guessed, Old French flambe is also the origin of the English adjective flambé.

Examples of flamboyant in a Sentence

Adjective Crazy artists, or flamboyant ones, can be strangely comforting. We feel we understand where their visions come from; we're lulled by the symmetry of turbulent art and turbulent lives. — Stephen Schiff, New Yorker, 28 Dec. 1992–4 Jan. 1993 Equally flamboyant is the group's singer, Andy Bell, who prances around the stage dressed at various times like an astronaut, a space creature or a Mexican senorita. — Jim Farber, Video Review, August 1990 … he was living in the flamboyant, urbane manner he craved, in an apartment that suited his Balzacian fantasies of success … — Raymond Sokolov, Wayward Reporter, 1980 the flamboyant gestures of the conductor has a gallery of flamboyant gestures that makes him easy to imitate
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective But their clothes weren’t flamboyant, boastful or self-conscious. Robin Givhan, Washington Post, "Their testimony was pointed. Their clothes were reassuringly dull.," 21 Nov. 2019 The coachbuilder was Henri Binder of 31 rue du Colisée in Paris, who showed admirable restraint in this car's design compared with his more flamboyant French competitors of the period. Kirk Seaman, Car and Driver, "Gooding Auction Joins Throng of Car Auction Mega-Events in January," 12 Jan. 2020 Suleimani, a flamboyant former construction worker and bodybuilder with snowy white hair, a dapper beard, and arching salt-and-pepper eyebrows, gained notice during the eight-year war with Iraq, in the nineteen eighties. Robin Wright, The New Yorker, "Is the Killing of Qassem Suleimani an Act of War?," 3 Jan. 2020 The flamboyant, larger-than-life Phil Walden became the label's face and driving force. Matt Wake, Billboard, "Capricorn Records: Dickey Betts, Alan Walden & More on the Iconic Southern Label's 50th," 3 Dec. 2019 The Spanish singer Rosalía also made a cameo in New York in typically flamboyant style, this time wearing a Gen Z-leaning graphic zip-up and a checked pair of short-shorts with oversize platform thong sandals. Vogue, "The Best Fashion Instagrams of the Week: Cardi B, Irina Shayk, and More," 7 Sep. 2019 But he is adored by the party members in the country who cherish his Bertie Wooster-with-a-thesaurus speeches and flamboyant style. The Economist, "And then there were two," 20 June 2019 The lack of transparency only exacerbates SoftBank’s core issue—its investors are essentially relying on their faith in the conglomerate’s flamboyant but unpredictable founder Masayoshi Son. Jacky Wong, WSJ, "How Much Is the World’s Largest Tech Fund Worth to SoftBank?," 9 May 2018 Mbuvi is known for controversy and his flamboyant dress. SFChronicle.com, "News of the Day From Across the World, Dec. 9," 9 Dec. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'flamboyant.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of flamboyant

Adjective

1832, in the meaning defined at sense 2

Noun

1879, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for flamboyant

Adjective and Noun

French, from present participle of flamboyer to flame, from Old French, from flambe

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Time Traveler for flamboyant

Time Traveler

The first known use of flamboyant was in 1832

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Last Updated

30 Jan 2020

Cite this Entry

“Flamboyant.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/flamboyant. Accessed 18 Feb. 2020.

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More Definitions for flamboyant

flamboyant

adjective
How to pronounce flamboyant (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of flamboyant

: having a very noticeable quality that attracts a lot of attention

flamboyant

adjective
flam·​boy·​ant | \ flam-ˈbȯi-ənt How to pronounce flamboyant (audio) \

Kids Definition of flamboyant

: having a noticeable or showy quality

Other Words from flamboyant

flamboyantly adverb

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