flamboyant

adjective
flam·​boy·​ant | \ flam-ˈbȯi-ənt How to pronounce flamboyant (audio) \

Definition of flamboyant

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : marked by or given to strikingly elaborate or colorful display or behavior a flamboyant performer
2 often capitalized : characterized by waving curves suggesting flames flamboyant tracery flamboyant architecture

flamboyant

noun

Definition of flamboyant (Entry 2 of 2)

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Other Words from flamboyant

Adjective

flamboyantly adverb

Did You Know?

Adjective

Flamboyant, which was borrowed into English from French in the 19th century, can be traced back to Old French flambe, meaning "flame." In its earliest uses flamboyant referred to a style of architecture, often in the florid French Gothic style, which featured waving curves that suggested flames. Eventually, the word developed a more general second sense for anything eye-catching or showy. As you have no doubt guessed, Old French flambe is also the origin of the English adjective flambé.

Examples of flamboyant in a Sentence

Adjective

Crazy artists, or flamboyant ones, can be strangely comforting. We feel we understand where their visions come from; we're lulled by the symmetry of turbulent art and turbulent lives. — Stephen Schiff, New Yorker, 28 Dec. 1992–4 Jan. 1993 Equally flamboyant is the group's singer, Andy Bell, who prances around the stage dressed at various times like an astronaut, a space creature or a Mexican senorita. — Jim Farber, Video Review, August 1990 … he was living in the flamboyant, urbane manner he craved, in an apartment that suited his Balzacian fantasies of success … — Raymond Sokolov, Wayward Reporter, 1980 the flamboyant gestures of the conductor has a gallery of flamboyant gestures that makes him easy to imitate
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective

President Trump should stage a flamboyant, Teddy Roosevelt–style show of force. Deroy Murdock, National Review, "Trump Should Assemble a Multinational Naval Convoy," 28 June 2019 Pretty much everyone expects Johnson to win the contest — unless the flamboyant, rumpled, ambitious former London mayor does something to trip himself up. Washington Post, "Boris Johnson, the likely next British prime minister, dogged by questions of character," 25 June 2019 The video, awash in rainbow hues, in set in a trailer park and features Swift strutting amid a flamboyant group of characters, all of whom seem to be having more fun than a gaggle of infuriated protestors. Mary Colurso | Mcolurso@al.com, al.com, "Did you see Laverne Cox, Trinity Taylor in Taylor Swift’s ‘Calm Down’ video touting LGBTQ pride?," 19 June 2019 UCO Bank’s move may have at least temporarily capped a turbulent, yet flamboyant, life story. Sangeeta Tanwar, Quartz India, "A flamboyant Indian industrialist is now chased by a bank his ancestor founded," 17 June 2019 Johnson has also been endorsed by some pro-EU Tories who think the flamboyant, tousle-haired ex-foreign secretary has the skills to energize a demoralized party and win back voters angry at the mess politicians have made of Brexit. Jill Lawless, SFChronicle.com, "Brexit advocate Boris Johnson builds momentum in UK prime minister race," 11 June 2019 My subject was Yukio Mishima, forty-one at the time, a best-selling novelist, playwright, literary critic, and flamboyant man-about-town. John Nathan, The New York Review of Books, "‘Night and Blood and Death’," 23 May 2019 Krakow was the adoptive home of the flamboyant Italian scholar Filippo Buonaccorsi, secretary to the Polish king and tutor to his children. National Geographic, "Copernicus's revolutionary ideas reorganized the heavens," 9 Apr. 2019 Highly visible without being flamboyant, Anthony’s shawl was arguably a secret weapon in making progressive feminism palatable to a wider audience. Kimberly Chrisman-campbell, The Atlantic, "When American Suffragists Tried to ‘Wear the Pants’," 12 June 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'flamboyant.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of flamboyant

Adjective

1832, in the meaning defined at sense 2

Noun

1879, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for flamboyant

Adjective and Noun

French, from present participle of flamboyer to flame, from Old French, from flambe

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Statistics for flamboyant

Last Updated

3 Jul 2019

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Time Traveler for flamboyant

The first known use of flamboyant was in 1832

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More Definitions for flamboyant

flamboyant

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of flamboyant

: having a very noticeable quality that attracts a lot of attention

flamboyant

adjective
flam·​boy·​ant | \ flam-ˈbȯi-ənt How to pronounce flamboyant (audio) \

Kids Definition of flamboyant

: having a noticeable or showy quality

Other Words from flamboyant

flamboyantly adverb

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