flamboyant

adjective
flam·boy·ant | \flam-ˈbȯi-ənt \

Definition of flamboyant 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : marked by or given to strikingly elaborate or colorful display or behavior a flamboyant performer

2 often capitalized : characterized by waving curves suggesting flames flamboyant tracery flamboyant architecture

flamboyant

noun

Definition of flamboyant (Entry 2 of 2)

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Other Words from flamboyant

Adjective

flamboyantly adverb

Did You Know?

Adjective

Flamboyant, which was borrowed into English from French in the 19th century, can be traced back to Old French flambe, meaning "flame." In its earliest uses flamboyant referred to a style of architecture, often in the florid French Gothic style, which featured waving curves that suggested flames. Eventually, the word developed a more general second sense for anything eye-catching or showy. As you have no doubt guessed, Old French flambe is also the origin of the English adjective flambé.

Examples of flamboyant in a Sentence

Adjective

Crazy artists, or flamboyant ones, can be strangely comforting. We feel we understand where their visions come from; we're lulled by the symmetry of turbulent art and turbulent lives. — Stephen Schiff, New Yorker, 28 Dec. 1992–4 Jan. 1993 Equally flamboyant is the group's singer, Andy Bell, who prances around the stage dressed at various times like an astronaut, a space creature or a Mexican senorita. — Jim Farber, Video Review, August 1990 … he was living in the flamboyant, urbane manner he craved, in an apartment that suited his Balzacian fantasies of success … — Raymond Sokolov, Wayward Reporter, 1980 the flamboyant gestures of the conductor has a gallery of flamboyant gestures that makes him easy to imitate
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective

The British royal family may prefer a subtle genuflection, but events like debutante balls offer occasions for a more flamboyant curtsy like the Texas Dip. Malia Wollan, New York Times, "How to Curtsy," 9 May 2018 And really, when else have these flamboyant actresses failed to make an impression? Kimber Walsh, latimes.com, "Review: 'Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation' hits the open seas with its creature comforts intact," 12 July 2018 The staging, costumes and flamboyant song-and-dance numbers, combined with the pre-curtain shower of beach balls and confetti, made for a splendidly goofy night out. Sam Walker, WSJ, "Now on Broadway: SpongeBob ChauvinistPants," 11 July 2018 Bono wore a top hat and acted the flamboyant master of ceremonies, even reviving his devilish MacPhisto character from the 1990s in a monologue that referenced President Trump and Kim Jong Un. Dan Deluca, Philly.com, "U2 keeps the faith with spectacularly staged 'Experience + Innocence' show at the Wells Fargo Center," 14 June 2018 Yet this flamboyant Hess persona on the mound hardly spoke about himself after the game. Brody Miller, NOLA.com, "How Zack Hess' 3 weeks of struggles led to him dominating Arkansas," 26 May 2018 Furth made a fortune with his law practice and lived a flamboyant lifestyle, yet gave away millions to endow a small Catholic primary school in San Francisco in memory of his late daughter. Carl Nolte, SFChronicle.com, "Memorial set for Fred Furth, noted SF attorney and Sonoma County vintner," 11 July 2018 Allusions, dramatic asides, neologisms and flamboyant punctuation became the hallmarks of his style. Thomas Curwen, latimes.com, "Tom Wolfe, novelist and pioneer of New Journalism, dies at 88," 15 May 2018 Allusions, dramatic asides, neologisms and flamboyant punctuation became the hallmarks of his style. Thomas Curwen, sacbee, "Tom Wolfe, novelist and pioneer of New Journalism, dies at 88 | The Sacramento Bee," 15 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'flamboyant.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of flamboyant

Adjective

1832, in the meaning defined at sense 2

Noun

1879, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for flamboyant

Adjective

French, from present participle of flamboyer to flame, from Old French, from flambe

Noun

see flamboyant entry 1

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Statistics for flamboyant

Last Updated

9 Oct 2018

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Time Traveler for flamboyant

The first known use of flamboyant was in 1832

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More Definitions for flamboyant

flamboyant

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of flamboyant

: having a very noticeable quality that attracts a lot of attention

flamboyant

adjective
flam·boy·ant | \flam-ˈbȯi-ənt \

Kids Definition of flamboyant

: having a noticeable or showy quality

Other Words from flamboyant

flamboyantly adverb

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