flamboyant

adjective
flam·​boy·​ant | \ flam-ˈbȯi-ənt How to pronounce flamboyant (audio) \

Definition of flamboyant

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : marked by or given to strikingly elaborate or colorful display or behavior a flamboyant performer
2 often capitalized : characterized by waving curves suggesting flames flamboyant tracery flamboyant architecture

flamboyant

noun

Definition of flamboyant (Entry 2 of 2)

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Other Words from flamboyant

Adjective

flamboyantly adverb

Did You Know?

Adjective

Flamboyant, which was borrowed into English from French in the 19th century, can be traced back to Old French flambe, meaning "flame." In its earliest uses flamboyant referred to a style of architecture, often in the florid French Gothic style, which featured waving curves that suggested flames. Eventually, the word developed a more general second sense for anything eye-catching or showy. As you have no doubt guessed, Old French flambe is also the origin of the English adjective flambé.

Examples of flamboyant in a Sentence

Adjective Crazy artists, or flamboyant ones, can be strangely comforting. We feel we understand where their visions come from; we're lulled by the symmetry of turbulent art and turbulent lives. — Stephen Schiff, New Yorker, 28 Dec. 1992–4 Jan. 1993 Equally flamboyant is the group's singer, Andy Bell, who prances around the stage dressed at various times like an astronaut, a space creature or a Mexican senorita. — Jim Farber, Video Review, August 1990 … he was living in the flamboyant, urbane manner he craved, in an apartment that suited his Balzacian fantasies of success … — Raymond Sokolov, Wayward Reporter, 1980 the flamboyant gestures of the conductor has a gallery of flamboyant gestures that makes him easy to imitate
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective The flamboyant kaleidoscopic trousers, which gave the illusion of patchwork, are by the designer Kat Rose, based in Portsmouth, England. Liana Satenstein, Vogue, "Dua Lipa Embraces the Growing Trend of Hand-Painted Clothes," 24 Feb. 2021 Tall, lean and neatly bearded, Ferlinghetti was the opposite of flamboyant. Los Angeles Times, "Lawrence Ferlinghetti, poet and titan of the Beat era, dies at 101," 23 Feb. 2021 None of the other vehicles currently up for auction come close to matching the Ferrari's flamboyant swagger. Matt Mckinney, Star Tribune, "Burnsville drunken driving arrest ends with vintage Ferrari on the auction block," 19 Feb. 2021 The casino-hotel, built in 1984 at a cost of $214 million, was the flamboyant developer's first venture in the city. Editors, USA TODAY, "Brutal winter weather, Trump Plaza, pandemic job losses: 5 things you need to know Wednesday," 17 Feb. 2021 Back in April, when word of Exotic’s flamboyant pardon campaign found its way to the White House press corps, Trump notably asked CNN journalist Jim Acosta for his opinion on pardoning the former zoo owner. al, "‘Tiger King’ Joe Exotic: ‘I was too innocent and too GAY’ for Trump pardon," 21 Jan. 2021 These dictums come from above, and the basic things are not given to our citizens, and this sort of flamboyant display of this identity is put on display to a ghostly Times Square. Isaac Chotiner, The New Yorker, "How Mira Nair Made Her Own “Suitable Boy”," 7 Dec. 2020 Methodical march to record-tying sixth Lombardi Trophy largely lacked flair, flamboyant Gronk even retiring (for a while) afterward. Nate Davis, USA TODAY, "The 55 greatest teams to play in the Super Bowl – and not all won Lombardi Trophy," 31 Jan. 2021 Back in April, when word of Exotic’s flamboyant pardon campaign found its way to the White House press corps, Trump notably asked CNN journalist Jim Acosta for his opinion on pardoning the former zoo owner. al, "‘Tiger King’ Joe Exotic: ‘I was too innocent and too GAY’ for Trump pardon," 21 Jan. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'flamboyant.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of flamboyant

Adjective

1832, in the meaning defined at sense 2

Noun

1879, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for flamboyant

Adjective and Noun

French, from present participle of flamboyer to flame, from Old French, from flambe

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Time Traveler for flamboyant

Time Traveler

The first known use of flamboyant was in 1832

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Last Updated

5 Mar 2021

Cite this Entry

“Flamboyant.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/flamboyant. Accessed 7 Mar. 2021.

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More Definitions for flamboyant

flamboyant

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of flamboyant

: having a very noticeable quality that attracts a lot of attention

flamboyant

adjective
flam·​boy·​ant | \ flam-ˈbȯi-ənt How to pronounce flamboyant (audio) \

Kids Definition of flamboyant

: having a noticeable or showy quality

Other Words from flamboyant

flamboyantly adverb

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Comments on flamboyant

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