fiscal

adjective
fis·cal | \ˈfi-skəl \

Definition of fiscal 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : of or relating to taxation, public revenues, or public debt fiscal policy the city's fiscal requirements

2 : of or relating to financial matters fiscal transactions

fiscal

noun

Definition of fiscal (Entry 2 of 2)

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Other Words from fiscal

Adjective

fiscally \ˈfi-skə-lē \ adverb

Synonyms & Antonyms for fiscal

Synonyms: Adjective

dollars-and-cents, financial, monetary, pecuniary, pocket

Antonyms: Adjective

nonfinancial

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Did You Know?

Adjective

Fiscal derives from the Latin noun fiscus, meaning "basket" or "treasury." In ancient Rome, "fiscus" was the term for the treasury controlled by the emperor, where the money was literally stored in baskets and was collected primarily in the form of revenue from the provinces. "Fiscus" also gives us our word confiscate, which now means "to seize" but once referred to the forfeiting of private property to public use. Today we find "fiscal" in a number of phrases, including "fiscal year" (referring to a 12-month accounting period not necessarily coinciding with the calendar year) and "fiscal cliff," a term that rose to prominence in the U.S. in 2012 when much attention was focused on a series of anticipated year-end tax increases and spending cuts.

Examples of fiscal in a Sentence

Adjective

the fiscal health of the university gained some fiscal knowledge by taking an economics course

Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective

The mayor credits part of the city’s fiscal discipline to Coronado’s military history. Gustavo Solis, sandiegouniontribune.com, "Coronado's got a year's worth of cash on hand - and then some," 16 June 2018 As always, ministers have promised reforms, a return to central-bank independence and fiscal discipline as soon as the elections are over. The Economist, "Surrender your dollars, urges Turkey’s President Erdogan," 14 June 2018 Despite the fiscal crisis facing Garces’ operation overall, Sorkin and Spinner maintain that those three restaurants are highly profitable. Michael Klein, Philly.com, "Investors file appeal to block Garces auction," 8 June 2018 Over the last year, as Hartford’s fiscal crisis has come to a head, Mayor Luke Bronin moved to limit the amount of unused sick and vacation time that non-union employees may accrue. Jenna Carlesso, Courant Community, "Former Hartford Police Chief Named Security Director For City Schools," 27 Apr. 2018 While Hassett agreed that deficits need to be tackled, right now neither party seems focused on fiscal discipline. Mark Trumbull, The Christian Science Monitor, "Even with worker shortages, GOP and Democrats focus on more jobs," 26 Apr. 2018 Ryan and his team will have to narrowly navigate make-or-break votes like fiscal cliffs. Chris Stirewalt, Fox News, "How hard will McCarthy go against Mueller?," 23 Apr. 2018 Nor have Republicans ever suffered political consequences for their disregard of fiscal discipline. Mark Schmitt, Vox, "Yes, Democrats are the party of fiscal responsibility. But that will (and should) change.," 20 Apr. 2018 The debt, which is now at $20 trillion, is near the tipping point of a severe fiscal crisis. Stephen Koff, cleveland.com, "Don Elijah Eckhart, U.S. Senate candidate," 22 Mar. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The treasurer doesn't have much authority to set the state's fiscal or any other type of policy. Julia O'donoghue, NOLA.com, "Should Louisiana elect its state treasurer?," 13 Oct. 2017 If approved, the plan could raise $435 million through 2019, according to an April fiscal analysis of HB 2186. Joseph O’sullivan, The Seattle Times, "Legislators look at compromise ideas to raise more revenue," 5 June 2017 This year that is not an option if Republicans want to advance their ambitious fiscal... Kate Davidson, WSJ, "GOP’s Path to Tax Changes Slowed by Upcoming Budget Fight," 18 May 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'fiscal.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of fiscal

Adjective

1563, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun

1869, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for fiscal

Adjective

Latin fiscalis, from fiscus basket, treasury

Noun

see fiscal entry 1

Adjective

Latin fiscalis, from fiscus basket, treasury

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Statistics for fiscal

Last Updated

10 Oct 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for fiscal

The first known use of fiscal was in 1563

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More Definitions for fiscal

fiscal

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of fiscal

: of or relating to money and especially to the money a government, business, or organization earns, spends, and owes

fiscal

adjective
fis·cal | \ˈfis-kəl \

Legal Definition of fiscal 

1 : of or relating to taxation, public revenues, or public debt fiscal policy

2 : of or relating to financial matters

Other Words from fiscal

fiscally adverb

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More from Merriam-Webster on fiscal

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for fiscal

Spanish Central: Translation of fiscal

Nglish: Translation of fiscal for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of fiscal for Arabic Speakers

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