felon

noun
fel·​on | \ ˈfe-lən How to pronounce felon (audio) \

Definition of felon

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : one who has committed a felony
2 archaic : villain
3 : a painful abscess of the deep tissues of the palmar surface of the fingertip that is typically caused by bacterial infection (as with a staphylococcus) and is marked by swelling and pain — compare whitlow sense 1

felon

adjective

Definition of felon (Entry 2 of 2)

1 archaic
a : cruel
b : evil
2 archaic : wild

Examples of felon in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Jail records showed Velazquez was being held Tuesday without bail on suspicion of murder and being a felon in possession of a firearm. Alex Riggins, San Diego Union-Tribune, "San Diego police arrest suspect in deadly Gaslamp Quarter shooting," 17 Nov. 2020 But agents from the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives were unable to prove that Jones ever had possession of the handgun ultimately used by Legghette, a felon who wasn’t allowed to own a weapon. Jeremy Gorner, chicagotribune.com, "Judge weighing whether to dismiss lawsuit against website linked to sale of gun used to kill Chicago police Cmdr. Paul Bauer," 10 Nov. 2020 Moore, who is from Toledo, was charged, according to news accounts, with first-degree murder, felony murder, first-degree home invasion, felon in possession of a firearm and four counts of felony firearm. Frank Witsil, Detroit Free Press, "2nd suspect suddenly released in high-profile 2017 death of singer Egypt Covington," 10 Nov. 2020 This week, Simmons is believed to be Washington state’s first felon to win legislative office when voters elected her to the Washington State legislature. Washington Post, "She is a former addict and prisoner. She was just elected to the state house in Washington.," 7 Nov. 2020 An ex-felon, Boldin’s brother-in-law was overcome with emotion. Mike Jones, USA TODAY, "Despite helping restore voting rights for millions, Players Coalition’s work far from over," 6 Nov. 2020 Hightire is charged with harboring or aiding a felon. Ricardo Torres, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Two Milwaukee men charged in hit-and-run death of 7-year-old girl," 5 Nov. 2020 The new federal felon in possession of a firearm conviction could carry a maximum sentence of 10 years. oregonlive, "Federal jury finds Portland rap artist guilty of possessing gun as a felon," 4 Nov. 2020 The move was questioned by local election supervisors because the process to remove a felon from the rolls would take 30 days, long past the Nov. 3 Election Day, which means most felons would still secure their vote. Mica Soellner, Washington Examiner, "More than 67,000 Florida felons registered to vote in key swing state," 20 Oct. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Before its passing, Florida had a 150-year ban on felon voting. Mica Soellner, Washington Examiner, "More than 67,000 Florida felons registered to vote in key swing state," 20 Oct. 2020 The state sent the felon memo to the 67 county election supervisors this week, but did not distribute it publicly. Terry Spencer, Star Tribune, "Florida felon purge would be too late for this election," 16 Oct. 2020 Just this week, Florida’s Department of State published guidance on ex-felon voting eligibility. Rachel Glickhouse, ProPublica, "Electionland 2020: USPS Chaos, Election Cybersecurity, August Voting and More," 14 Aug. 2020 Nineteen states and the District of Columbia filed a brief asking an appeals court to rule against the state in its ex-felon voting case. Rachel Glickhouse, ProPublica, "Electionland 2020: Masks at the Polls, Election Funding, Ex-Felon Enfranchisement and More," 7 Aug. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'felon.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of felon

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Adjective

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for felon

Noun

Middle English, from Anglo-French felun, fel evildoer, probably of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German fillen to beat, whip, fel skin — more at fell

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about felon

Time Traveler for felon

Time Traveler

The first known use of felon was in the 13th century

See more words from the same century

Statistics for felon

Last Updated

30 Nov 2020

Cite this Entry

“Felon.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/felon. Accessed 4 Dec. 2020.

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for felon

felon

noun
How to pronounce felon (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of felon

: a criminal who has committed a serious crime (called a felony)

felon

noun
fel·​on | \ ˈfe-lən How to pronounce felon (audio) \

Kids Definition of felon

felon

noun
fel·​on

Medical Definition of felon

: a painful abscess of the deep tissues of the palmar surface of the fingertip that is typically caused by infection of a bacterium (such as Staphylococcus aureus) and is marked by swelling and pain — compare paronychia, whitlow sense 1

Keep scrolling for more

felon

noun
fel·​on | \ ˈfe-lən How to pronounce felon (audio) \

Legal Definition of felon

: one who has committed a felony

History and Etymology for felon

Anglo-French felon, fel, literally, evildoer, from Old French, probably of Germanic origin

Keep scrolling for more

Comments on felon

What made you want to look up felon? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Musical Words Quiz

  • gramophone
  • Which word describes a musical performance marked by the absence of instrumental accompaniment?
Spell It

Can you spell these 10 commonly misspelled words?

TAKE THE QUIZ
Syn City

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!