feast

noun
\ ˈfēst How to pronounce feast (audio) \

Definition of feast

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : an elaborate and usually abundant meal often accompanied by a ceremony or entertainment : banquet
b(1) : something that gives unusual or abundant enjoyment a visual feast
(2) : abundance, profusion an unprecedented feast of corruption, gargantuan in scale— Neil Sheehan
2 : a periodic religious observance commemorating an event or honoring a deity, person, or thing

feast

verb
feasted; feasting; feasts

Definition of feast (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to take part in a feast
2 : to enjoy some unusual pleasure or delight

transitive verb

1 : to give a feast for
2 : delight, gratify feasting our eyes on the scenery

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Other Words from feast

Verb

feaster noun

Synonyms for feast

Synonyms: Noun

banquet, dinner, feed, regale, spread

Synonyms: Verb

banquet, dine, junket, regale

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Examples of feast in a Sentence

Noun

give the annual Thanksgiving feast Every guest brought a different dish to the party, and we had quite a feast. There were hundreds of guests at the royal wedding feast. the feast of the Nativity

Verb

the returning war heroes were feasted all over the country feast your eyes on all the fresh flowers at the farmers' market
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

San Francisco, California Think of the three-day Outside Lands Music & Arts Festival in Golden Gate Park as a feast for all your senses. Mark Ellwood, Condé Nast Traveler, "The Best Places to Visit in August," 26 June 2019 This created a tempting feast for bison herds, which the hunters then used to lure the bison in for the kill. Kiona N. Smith, Ars Technica, "Native Americans managed the prairie for better bison hunts," 25 July 2018 The persistent rain has been especially worrisome for farmers in central Illinois who grow most of the nation’s pumpkins and the processors who turn the squash into pie filling for the nation’s Thanksgiving feasts. Washington Post, "Rain leaves veggie farmers struggling with no aid in sight," 16 June 2019 Listen to folk music, play corn hole and Jenga, and feast on strawberry shortcake for dessert. Kara Baskin, BostonGlobe.com, "Steel & Rye toasts the season with Summer Solstice Party," 14 June 2019 This evening, feast on a traditional South African braai (barbeque). National Geographic, "Southern Africa Family Journey: In Search of the Big Five," 12 June 2019 These restaurant groups and organizations will spotlight the best of Connecticut’s bounty at special outdoor feasts. Leeanne Griffin, courant.com, "This year’s list of farm-to-table dinners in Connecticut," 5 June 2019 Davis is also intimately familiar with how carbohydrate-heavy feasts often sit at the center of tradition in many African-American households. Carolyn L. Todd, SELF, "Viola Davis on Being Diagnosed With Prediabetes: ‘I Was Shocked’," 1 May 2019 But the shift in location does come with some other changes for the scrappy festival, which offers up a feast of (relatively) cheap entertainment that arrives in quick bites of generally less than an hour’s running time. San Diego Union-Tribune, "San Diego International Fringe Festival unfolds this week in its new Balboa Park home," 5 June 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

The team often feasted on the junior circuit’s many second-division teams, yet proved largely incapable of matching the level of the elite teams in the AL. Alex Speier, BostonGlobe.com, "Oh, look, the Red Sox took a series from a good team," 19 June 2019 Green feasted barrelling downhill on the 4-on-3, tossing lob after lob in the Warriors’ sweep. Michael Shapiro, SI.com, "Can the Splash Brothers Pull Off One More Oracle Classic?," 13 June 2019 Two years into his tenure, Allen – the former coach at Ben Davis – is feasting on an exclusive diet of three- and-four-star recruits. Gregg Doyel, Indianapolis Star, "Doyel: IU, Purdue are actually, finally trying to win in football," 5 June 2019 The feeblest offensive team in the major leagues feasted off Milwaukee Brewers pitching on Tuesday. Todd Rosiak, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Marlins 16, Brewers 0: A laugher from the very start," 4 June 2019 Xena and her weeks-old baby nonchalantly feasted on cucumber and other delicacies late Sunday morning at the zoo as eager onlookers crowded near. Bradley J. Fikes, San Diego Union-Tribune, "Baby sloth enchants crowd at San Diego Zoo," 11 June 2019 The hosting rat eventually poops out the young parasites, which then get gobbled up by feces-feasting snails and slugs (intermediate hosts). Beth Mole, Ars Technica, "Hawaii warns tourists of parasitic worm that can burrow into human brains," 30 May 2019 The round cake, which nowadays comes decked out in green, gold and purple icing, dates back to the Middle Ages when European Christians feasted before the Lenten fast. Olivia B. Waxman, Time, "The History Behind 5 of New Orleans' Favorite Mardi Gras Traditions," 12 Feb. 2018 Rather than feasting on, say, a plate of catfish in the years before his death, Burial 7/I might have spooned up calorie-rich porridge, a mix of cereals and goat’s milk. Mark Barna, Discover Magazine, "When Farmers and Foragers First Met," 24 Oct. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'feast.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of feast

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

History and Etymology for feast

Noun

Middle English feste, from Anglo-French, from Latin festa, plural of festum festival, from neuter of festus solemn, festal; akin to Latin feriae holidays, fanum temple

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Statistics for feast

Last Updated

6 Jul 2019

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Time Traveler for feast

The first known use of feast was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for feast

feast

noun

English Language Learners Definition of feast

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a special meal with large amounts of food and drink : a large formal dinner
: a religious festival

feast

verb

English Language Learners Definition of feast (Entry 2 of 2)

: to eat large amounts of food

feast

noun
\ ˈfēst How to pronounce feast (audio) \

Kids Definition of feast

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a very large or fancy meal
2 : a holy day observed by members of a religion

feast

verb
feasted; feasting

Kids Definition of feast (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to eat well
2 : delight entry 2 sense 1 She feasted her eyes on the decorations.

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More from Merriam-Webster on feast

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with feast

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for feast

Spanish Central: Translation of feast

Nglish: Translation of feast for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of feast for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about feast

Comments on feast

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