feast

noun
\ ˈfēst How to pronounce feast (audio) \

Definition of feast

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : an elaborate and usually abundant meal often accompanied by a ceremony or entertainment : banquet
b(1) : something that gives unusual or abundant enjoyment a visual feast
(2) : abundance, profusion an unprecedented feast of corruption, gargantuan in scale— Neil Sheehan
2 : a periodic religious observance commemorating an event or honoring a deity, person, or thing

feast

verb
feasted; feasting; feasts

Definition of feast (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to take part in a feast
2 : to enjoy some unusual pleasure or delight

transitive verb

1 : to give a feast for
2 : delight, gratify feasting our eyes on the scenery

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Other Words from feast

Verb

feaster noun

Synonyms for feast

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

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Examples of feast in a Sentence

Noun give the annual Thanksgiving feast Every guest brought a different dish to the party, and we had quite a feast. There were hundreds of guests at the royal wedding feast. the feast of the Nativity Verb the returning war heroes were feasted all over the country feast your eyes on all the fresh flowers at the farmers' market
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The feast for the senses has been designed by award-winning designer Tom Piper – best known for his stage designs for the V&A, the Royal Shakespeare Company and his Tower of London poppies installation. Angelina Villa-clarke, Forbes, "How The V&A’s New Alice Curiouser And Curiouser Exhibition Will Take You On A Hyper-Imaginative Journey," 20 Apr. 2021 The kickoff, Nowruz (New Day), was Saturday, and though the feast for that gets lots of fanfare, the holiday concludes with Sizdeh Beder (Nature Day), April 2. New York Times, "To-Go Meals for Sizdeh Beder," 22 Mar. 2021 The roving feast known as the 2021 South Beach Wine and Food Festival on Monday unveiled its full schedule of celebrity chefs and exclusive dinners for its sprawling bacchanal, returning May 20-23. Phillip Valys, sun-sentinel.com, "New rule for South Beach Wine and Food Festival 2021: Proof of COVID vaccination," 15 Mar. 2021 The time stamps on the photos indicate the Thanksgiving morning feast lasted for more than three hours. Matt Williams, Dallas News, "Sightings of mountain lions are rare," 16 Jan. 2021 Four generations on, the Grinch’s humble roots on the page as a black-and-white sourpuss, looking down on Who-ville and rueing the impending town feast, have become a Christmas cottage industry. Patrick Sauer, Smithsonian Magazine, "The Grinch That Keeps on Grinching," 9 Dec. 2020 The feast before them was provided using ingredients from their local food bank. Noah Robertson, The Christian Science Monitor, "More American families struggling to afford food. Can food banks cope?," 8 Dec. 2020 For many Catholics, the feast this year will be more significant, despite changes in celebrations brought on by the coronavirus pandemic. Laura Rodríguez Presa, chicagotribune.com, "‘She is with us wherever we are’: Believers find ways to honor Our Lady of Guadalupe for annual feast despite COVID-19 restrictions," 8 Dec. 2020 For me, Thanksgiving has never been about the feast. Washington Post, "As a food writer with covid, I worried I’d lose my sense of taste. It turned out to be much worse.," 29 Nov. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb In one of several experiments, workers are erecting large tanks where bacteria will feast on carbon dioxide from plant exhaust and turn it into ethanol, which can then be used in making chemicals. New York Times, "How to Clean Up Steel? Bacteria, Hydrogen and a Lot of Cash.," 17 Mar. 2021 The Supreme Court has cleared the way for New York City prosecutors to feast their eyes on Donald Trump's taxes — a brutal defeat for the former president. Ashley Shaffer, USA TODAY, "This is what one of 500K deaths looks like," 23 Feb. 2021 Along the way, passengers can feast their eyes on desert landscapes, vast canyons, and natural archways. Jessica Poitevien, Travel + Leisure, "This Luxury Train Will Take You Through the American Southwest — and You Can Save $300 If You Book Soon," 1 Apr. 2021 The Warriors ratcheted up the offensive movement, began to feast on open shots and trimmed the deficit to 123-121 on a Curry 3-pointer with 2:01 left. Connor Letourneau, SFChronicle.com, "Damion Lee’s late 3-pointer lifts Warriors to 129-128 win over Bulls," 27 Dec. 2020 Country isn’t the only major genre that has gone from famine to feast in terms of award shows. Paul Grein, Billboard, "Country Pile-Up: CMA Nods Will Be Announced Just 15 Days Before the Rival ACM Awards Are Presented," 28 Aug. 2020 Guests feast on them using crab mallets to crack open. Susan Selasky, Detroit Free Press, "Chesapeake Bay blue crabs coming to Birmingham restaurant," 17 Mar. 2021 If your go-to knives simply aren’t cutting it these days (pun intended!), feast your eyes on this best-selling 10-Piece Cuisinart knife set, which is currently on sale at Macy’s for less than $15. Arielle Tschinkel, USA TODAY, "This 10-piece Cuisinart knife set has a perfect 5-star rating—and it's less than $15," 28 Jan. 2021 Overall, the top teams may feast on Seattle and Texas in their quest for the top spot. Bernie Pleskoff, Forbes, "MLB American League West Preview: Houston Astros Are The Team To Beat," 4 Mar. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'feast.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of feast

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

History and Etymology for feast

Noun

Middle English feste, from Anglo-French, from Latin festa, plural of festum festival, from neuter of festus solemn, festal; akin to Latin feriae holidays, fanum temple

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Time Traveler for feast

Time Traveler

The first known use of feast was in the 13th century

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Statistics for feast

Last Updated

1 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Feast.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/feast. Accessed 9 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for feast

feast

noun

English Language Learners Definition of feast

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a special meal with large amounts of food and drink : a large formal dinner
: a religious festival

feast

verb

English Language Learners Definition of feast (Entry 2 of 2)

: to eat large amounts of food

feast

noun
\ ˈfēst How to pronounce feast (audio) \

Kids Definition of feast

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a very large or fancy meal
2 : a holy day observed by members of a religion

feast

verb
feasted; feasting

Kids Definition of feast (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to eat well
2 : delight entry 2 sense 1 She feasted her eyes on the decorations.

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Comments on feast

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