feast

noun
\ ˈfēst \

Definition of feast 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1a : an elaborate and usually abundant meal often accompanied by a ceremony or entertainment : banquet
b(1) : something that gives unusual or abundant enjoyment a visual feast
(2) : abundance, profusion an unprecedented feast of corruption, gargantuan in scale— Neil Sheehan
2 : a periodic religious observance commemorating an event or honoring a deity, person, or thing

feast

verb
feasted; feasting; feasts

Definition of feast (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to take part in a feast
2 : to enjoy some unusual pleasure or delight

transitive verb

1 : to give a feast for
2 : delight, gratify feasting our eyes on the scenery

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Other Words from feast

Verb

feaster noun

Synonyms for feast

Synonyms: Noun

banquet, dinner, feed, regale, spread

Synonyms: Verb

banquet, dine, junket, regale

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Examples of feast in a Sentence

Noun

give the annual Thanksgiving feast Every guest brought a different dish to the party, and we had quite a feast. There were hundreds of guests at the royal wedding feast. the feast of the Nativity

Verb

the returning war heroes were feasted all over the country feast your eyes on all the fresh flowers at the farmers' market
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Viral jokes erupted and died within hours, only to have savvy brands feast on the corpse by day’s end. Verge Staff, The Verge, "The best memes of 2018, according to The Verge staff," 27 Dec. 2018 Diners hop into a heritage Voyageur canoe like those used by Canada’s earliest settlers, paddle across the harbor to City Island, and feast on a multicourse (cold) meal. Kris Frieswick, WSJ, "Canada’s City of the Future Rides a New Wave," 4 Dec. 2018 The urchins feast on a conveyor belt of kelp salad — leaves that have broken off kelp plants. Katherine Long, The Seattle Times, "In a five-person submarine, scientists in Friday Harbor unravel the mysteries of the Salish Sea," 16 Sep. 2018 Florida's red tide algae feast on a variety of nutrients, some natural and others man-made. David Grossman, Popular Mechanics, "What Are Red Tides and Why Are They Getting Worse?," 14 Aug. 2018 Some species of fireflies lay their eggs in rotten logs and other brush on the forest floor, and the larvae feast on the slugs, snails, and worms that this type of damp habitat attracts. Rebecca Straus, Good Housekeeping, "5 Ways to Attract Fireflies to Your Yard," 19 July 2018 And the evening of your Thanksgiving feast is the perfect time to have at it. Lauren Valenti, Vogue, "Why “Gut Shots” Are the Key to Healthy Holiday Eating," 22 Nov. 2018 One can imagine letting the simple aesthetic of Kreuz Market inform your feast: Maybe this is the year to leave grandma’s china in the cupboard, and instead set the table with sheets of butcher paper—cutlery optional. Elizabeth G. Dunn And Matthew Kronsberg, WSJ, "The Battle for Thanksgiving Heats Up," 31 Oct. 2018 Order your feast ahead of time, pick it up starting November 17, and warm the food accordingly. Amanda Garrity, Good Housekeeping, "18 Restaurants Open on Thanksgiving This Year," 16 Oct. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

This austere burn zone is a typical aftermath to intense fires that, over the course of centuries, periodically feast upon the huge amounts of wood that grow in the west-side forests of our region. Hal Bernton, The Seattle Times, "In a changing climate, will fire make a bigger run in Washington’s west-side forests?," 4 Sep. 2018 Today, Nebraska is an agricultural hub that thrives on maize, so during the day, cranes flock to farmers’ fields to feast on corn. National Geographic, "This Is What One of the Last Great Migrations Looks Like," 17 Apr. 2018 Having feasted more than most on this federal rat poison, Lehman was deeply insolvent, ultimately paying creditors holding $450 billion only 14 cents on the dollar. WSJ, "Considering Lehman’s Failure 10 Years Later," 19 Sep. 2018 Rosh Hashanah also begins the High Holidays — a special period of celebration and penance, feasting and fasting, and lots of prayer. Joshua Eaton, Teen Vogue, "Everything You Need to Know About Rosh Hashanah," 10 Sep. 2018 The property’s magnificent walled garden is open to the public (many want to feast their eyes on the Pineapple!), but privacy can be found in another garden, tucked away behind the house and saved exclusively for guests. Max Maeckler, Vogue, "You Can Rent a Pineapple Palace on the Airbnb For Historic Homes," 16 Aug. 2018 After feasting for weeks each summer, the most impressive males waddle away to hibernation weighing more than three NFL nose tackles. Christopher Solomon, Outside Online, "Op-Ed: Alaska’s Pebble Mine Somehow Just Got Worse," 11 June 2018 Members of the Red squad will be treated to steak during the team’s luncheon on Monday afternoon, while the White team will feast on hot dogs and beans. Wells Dusenbury, Sun-Sentinel.com, "Robison, Johnson go head-to-head in QB battle; locals shine in FAU spring game," 22 Apr. 2018 After feasting on the power play in the first two games, the Blue Jackets failed to score on four tries with a man advantage. Mitch Stacy, baltimoresun.com, "Capitals beat Blue Jackets, 3-2, in second overtime to cut series deficit to 2-1," 18 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'feast.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of feast

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

History and Etymology for feast

Noun

Middle English feste, from Anglo-French, from Latin festa, plural of festum festival, from neuter of festus solemn, festal; akin to Latin feriae holidays, fanum temple

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Statistics for feast

Last Updated

5 Jan 2019

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Time Traveler for feast

The first known use of feast was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for feast

feast

noun

English Language Learners Definition of feast

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a special meal with large amounts of food and drink : a large formal dinner

: a religious festival

feast

verb

English Language Learners Definition of feast (Entry 2 of 2)

: to eat large amounts of food

feast

noun
\ ˈfēst \

Kids Definition of feast

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a very large or fancy meal
2 : a holy day observed by members of a religion

feast

verb
feasted; feasting

Kids Definition of feast (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to eat well
2 : delight entry 2 sense 1 She feasted her eyes on the decorations.

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More from Merriam-Webster on feast

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with feast

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for feast

Spanish Central: Translation of feast

Nglish: Translation of feast for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of feast for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about feast

Comments on feast

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