feast

1 of 2

noun

1
a
: an elaborate and usually abundant meal often accompanied by a ceremony or entertainment : banquet
b(1)
: something that gives unusual or abundant enjoyment
a visual feast
(2)
: abundance, profusion
an unprecedented feast of corruption, gargantuan in scaleNeil Sheehan
2
: a periodic religious observance commemorating an event or honoring a deity, person, or thing

feast

2 of 2

verb

feasted; feasting; feasts

intransitive verb

1
: to take part in a feast
2
: to enjoy some unusual pleasure or delight

transitive verb

1
: to give a feast for
2
: delight, gratify
feasting our eyes on the scenery
feaster noun

Examples of feast in a Sentence

Noun give the annual Thanksgiving feast Every guest brought a different dish to the party, and we had quite a feast. There were hundreds of guests at the royal wedding feast. the feast of the Nativity Verb the returning war heroes were feasted all over the country feast your eyes on all the fresh flowers at the farmers' market See More
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
Guests were treated to Soho House signature cocktails like the Picante de la Casa, a Mediterranean feast, and a special performance by BJ The Chicago Kid, DJ set by Vic Mensa with attendance and a toast by Adidas brand partner, New England Patriots wide receiver JuJu Smith-Schuster. Kimberly Wilson, Essence, 11 Feb. 2024 The staff began to deliver dishes of food, and within a few minutes the table was set for a feast. Elliot Ackerman, WIRED, 9 Feb. 2024 Super Bowl guests are truly in for a feast this year! Escher Walcott, Peoplemag, 7 Feb. 2024 As the sun set, a traditional Afghan feast was served under a billowing white tent. Elise Taylor, Vogue, 2 Feb. 2024 Ham is the main event for most people’s Easter Sunday feast. Andrea Weigl, Charlotte Observer, 31 Jan. 2024 Here, find our favorite recipes for this Easter’s feast. Patricia S York, Southern Living, 30 Jan. 2024 Order your Passover Seder feast for delivery on March 26 between 5:30 and 7 p.m. Your Farms, Your Table will also offer an Easter meal. Jessica Swannie, Charlotte Observer, 31 Jan. 2024 And, because vultures often lead their fellow-scavengers to food, their feasts were turning into communal massacres. Meera Subramanian, The New Yorker, 31 Jan. 2024
Verb
In the trailer, Nyong’o is walking down the street with her feline, enjoying a din of car horns and sirens, when streamers of debris shoot through the skyscrapers, and suddenly, the alien creatures feast on all the sound. Kory Grow, Rolling Stone, 7 Feb. 2024 Here, feast your eyes: (2) The fitting rooms reflected my first impression: So Much Natural Light. Katie Toussaint, Charlotte Observer, 31 Jan. 2024 The five have feasted from their family’s garden, gotten to know one grandfather’s pet chicken and taken hay rides with their other set of grandparents. Rick Montgomery, Kansas City Star, 31 Jan. 2024 Advertisement The Clippers feasted on Kawhi Leonard mid-range shots, James Harden stepbacks, Paul George drives and, yes, Westbrook threes. Houston Mitchell, Los Angeles Times, 24 Jan. 2024 At the bottom of the drawing, in front of her pelvis, there is a devilish, bat-like creature, feasting on an infant child. Moira Donegan, The New Yorker, 17 Jan. 2024 From on-set hangs to feasting on fish and chips, these are some of the sweetest moments shared between the cast of the The Bear. Alexandra Schonfeld, Peoplemag, 15 Jan. 2024 Of course, there are plenty of public places to feast. Christopher Cameron, Robb Report, 9 Jan. 2024 Wallabies and kangaroos would feast on the grass in the middle of the night, out of sight from predators. Praveena Somasundaram, Washington Post, 19 Jan. 2024 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'feast.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun

Middle English feste, from Anglo-French, from Latin festa, plural of festum festival, from neuter of festus solemn, festal; akin to Latin feriae holidays, fanum temple

First Known Use

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of feast was in the 13th century

Dictionary Entries Near feast

Cite this Entry

“Feast.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/feast. Accessed 23 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

feast

1 of 2 noun
1
: a meal with plenty of food and drink : banquet
2
: a religious festival or observance

feast

2 of 2 verb
1
: to eat plentifully : take part in a feast
2
: to entertain with a feast
3
: delight entry 2 sense 2
feast your eyes on the view
feaster noun
Etymology

Noun

Middle English feste "feast, festival," from early French feste (same meaning), from Latin festa, plural of festum "festival, feast" — related to festival, fiesta

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