extradition

noun

ex·​tra·​di·​tion ˌek-strə-ˈdi-shən How to pronounce extradition (audio)
: the surrender of an alleged criminal usually under the provisions of a treaty or statute by one authority (such as a state) to another having jurisdiction to try the charge

Examples of extradition in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Kenya has an extradition treaty with the United States. Larry Madowo, CNN, 8 Feb. 2024 Nikhil Gupta was arrested in Europe over the summer and the extradition process is currently underway in the Czech Republic. Robert Legare, CBS News, 29 Jan. 2024 The 35-year-old appeared at Westminster Magistrates’ Court on Monday for an extradition hearing and has been remanded in custody until Jan. 29, per the statement. Kirsty Hatcher, Peoplemag, 2 Jan. 2024 Think of the extradition of Japanese Americans to internment camps or President Truman’s use of the undeclared Korean War as a pretext to seize American steel mills in 1952. Christian Schneider, National Review, 21 Dec. 2023 Comanche was arrested Friday by the California FBI Criminal Apprehension Team in Sacramento and is awaiting extradition to Nevada on suspicion of kidnapping. Rachel Uranga, Los Angeles Times, 18 Dec. 2023 Since then Kim Dotcom has been fighting extradition to the U.S. to face charges of fraud. Scott Roxborough, The Hollywood Reporter, 27 Nov. 2023 In escaping to Venezuela, Mr. Francis may have believed that years of hostile diplomacy between Mr. Maduro and the United States would have shielded him from extradition. Lara Jakes, New York Times, 20 Dec. 2023 Harnden is in custody in Clark County, being held on a $500,000 bond, while Comanche is awaiting extradition from California to Nevada. Liam Quinn, Peoplemag, 19 Dec. 2023 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'extradition.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

French, from ex- + Latin tradition-, traditio act of handing over — more at treason

First Known Use

1810, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of extradition was in 1810

Dictionary Entries Near extradition

Cite this Entry

“Extradition.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/extradition. Accessed 26 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

extradition

noun
ex·​tra·​di·​tion ˌek-strə-ˈdish-ən How to pronounce extradition (audio)
: the delivery of an accused criminal from one place (as a U.S. state) to another where the trial will be held

Legal Definition

extradition

noun
ex·​tra·​di·​tion ˌek-strə-ˈdi-shən How to pronounce extradition (audio)
: the surrender of an accused usually under the provisions of a treaty or statute by one sovereign (as a state or nation) to another that has jurisdiction to try the accused and that has demanded his or her return see also asylum state compare detainer, rendition

Note: Article IV of the U.S. Constitution states: “A person charged in any State with treason, felony, or other crime, who shall flee from justice, and be found in another State, shall on demand of the executive authority of the State from which he fled, be delivered up, to be removed to the State having jurisdiction of the crime.”

Etymology

French, from Latin ex- out + traditio act of handing over, from tradere to hand over

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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