extradite

verb

ex·​tra·​dite ˈek-strə-ˌdīt How to pronounce extradite (audio)
extradited; extraditing

transitive verb

1
: to deliver up to extradition
2
: to obtain the extradition of

Did you know?

Extradite and its related noun extradition are both ultimately Latin in origin: their source is tradition-, tradition, meaning “the act of handing over.” (The word tradition, though centuries older, has the same source; consider tradition as something handed over from one generation to the next.) While extradition and extradite are of 19th century vintage, the U.S. Constitution, written in 1787, addresses the idea in Article IV: “A person charged in any State with treason, felony, or other crime, who shall flee from justice, and be found in another State, shall on demand of the executive authority of the State from which he fled, be delivered up, to be removed to the State having jurisdiction of the crime.”

Examples of extradite in a Sentence

He will be extradited from the U.S. to Canada to face criminal charges there. The prisoner was extradited across state lines.
Recent Examples on the Web Brazil does not extradite its own citizens when they are sentenced in other countries. Joseph Wilson, USA TODAY, 22 Feb. 2024 But for many years, China has generally refused to take back its citizens convicted of U.S. crimes, in part because the United States — out of human rights concerns — has refused to extradite Chinese that Beijing claims are criminal fugitives. Stuart Leavenworth, Sacramento Bee, 21 Feb. 2024 Assange is trying to challenge an original 2021 High Court court ruling that said he should be extradited despite claims of deteriorating mental health. Mary Whitfill Roeloffs, Forbes, 19 Feb. 2024 California Black Lives Matter leader targeted in third ‘swatting’ incident, the second since last week Sept. 29, 2021 Filion was extradited to Seminole County on Tuesday and booked into the John E. Polk Correctional Facility. Karen Garcia, Los Angeles Times, 3 Feb. 2024 Police arrested Filion on January 18, and he was extradited to Seminole County this week. Dhruv Mehrotra, WIRED, 1 Feb. 2024 Kaitlin Armstrong extradited back to the U.S. Kaitlin Armstrong Travis County Jail The Deputy Marshals took Armstrong back to Texas where she was charged with Wilson's murder and held in jail. Megan Brown, CBS News, 30 Jan. 2024 He has not yet been extradited, according to the outlet. Makiya Seminera, Miami Herald, 30 Jan. 2024 Haitian authorities agreed a year ago to extradite Sanon to the U.S. , where he was charged with the less serious smuggling and Neutrality Act offenses. Jacqueline Charles, Miami Herald, 9 Feb. 2024 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'extradite.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

back-formation from extradition

First Known Use

1864, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of extradite was in 1864

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Dictionary Entries Near extradite

Cite this Entry

“Extradite.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/extradite. Accessed 29 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

extradite

verb
ex·​tra·​dite ˈek-strə-ˌdīt How to pronounce extradite (audio)
extradited; extraditing
: to cause to be delivered by extradition
extraditable
-ˌdīt-ə-bəl
adjective

Legal Definition

extradite

transitive verb
ex·​tra·​dite ˈek-strə-ˌdīt How to pronounce extradite (audio)
extradited; extraditing
1
: to deliver up to extradition
2
: to obtain the extradition of
extraditability
ˌek-strə-ˌdī-tə-ˈbi-lə-tē
noun
extraditable adjective

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