exploitative

adjective
ex·​ploit·​ative | \ ik-ˈsplȯi-tə-tiv How to pronounce exploitative (audio) , ek-ˌsplȯi- How to pronounce exploitative (audio) \

Definition of exploitative

: exploiting or tending to exploit especially : unfairly or cynically using another person or group for profit or advantage exploitative terms of employment an exploitative film

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Other Words from exploitative

exploitatively adverb

Examples of exploitative in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web But those workers are victims of an exploitative labor arrangement sustained by cheap venture capital that subsidizes artificially low prices for consumers. Jacob Silverman, The New Republic, "Instacart Is a Parasite and a Sham," 30 Dec. 2020 The virus, combined with the harsh spotlight that shined on racial inequality in the United States, further exposed the exploitative side of a system that relies heavily on Black football and basketball players to bring in the bucks. Eddie Pells, orlandosentinel.com, "COVID-19, lawsuits signal changes looming for college sports," 25 Dec. 2020 Journalist Gabrielle Glaser follows Erle’s journey in a wrenching narrative centered on the exploitative adoption processes in postwar America. Annabel Gutterman, Time, "Here Are the 10 New Books You Should Read in January," 22 Dec. 2020 Still, videos of straight men jumping into one another’s laps or admiring each other’s rear ends for the sake of TikTok views can feel exploitative, especially to gay viewers. Alex Hawgood, New York Times, "Everyone Is Gay on TikTok," 24 Oct. 2020 The Cargin-Lugar amendment started as a measure to counter corruption fueling the exploitative governance that keeps societies in many resource-rich countries cash-poor. Ian J. Lynch, The New Republic, "Why Can’t the SEC Just Agree That Bribing Foreign Governments Is Bad?," 16 Dec. 2020 Tiny Pretty Things, while being a dramatic interpretation of the world of dance, gets a lot of things right both in capturing its intensity, competitiveness and in recognising the exploitative history of ballet. Sarah Midkiff, refinery29.com, "Tiny Pretty Things’ Ballet World Is Hyperrealistic — I Know From Experience," 15 Dec. 2020 Data showed that many temporary workers (often students working between school sessions) had been victims of exploitative practices. Samuel Axon, Ars Technica, "Ex-Apple employees say company ignored China labor-law violations," 10 Dec. 2020 Director Wolfe has added an epilogue, spelling out that chain of exploitative musical commerce. Michael Phillips, chicagotribune.com, "‘Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom’ review: In 1927 Chicago, Chadwick Boseman, Viola Davis and August Wilson play glorious three-part harmony," 20 Nov. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'exploitative.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of exploitative

1879, in the meaning defined above

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Time Traveler for exploitative

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The first known use of exploitative was in 1879

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Last Updated

11 Jan 2021

Cite this Entry

“Exploitative.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/exploitative. Accessed 17 Jan. 2021.

More from Merriam-Webster on exploitative

Britannica English: Translation of exploitative for Arabic Speakers

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