exotic

adjective
ex·​ot·​ic | \ ig-ˈzä-tik How to pronounce exotic (audio) \

Definition of exotic

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : introduced from another country : not native to the place where found exotic plants
2 archaic : foreign, alien
3 : strikingly, excitingly, or mysteriously different or unusual exotic flavors
4 : of or relating to striptease exotic dancing

exotic

noun

Definition of exotic (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : one (such as a plant or animal) that is exotic

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Other Words from exotic

Adjective

exotically \ ig-​ˈzä-​ti-​k(ə-​)lē How to pronounce exotically (audio) \ adverb
exoticness \ ig-​ˈzä-​tik-​nəs How to pronounce exoticness (audio) \ noun

Examples of exotic in a Sentence

Adjective She's known for her exotic tastes. the gradual disappearance of exotic lands in a culturally homogenized world Noun Some native species are being crowded out by exotics. the botanical garden boasts an array of horticultural exotics from around the world
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Ritholtz’s Carson, meanwhile, suspects ultra-low interest rates will encourage financial institutions to start marketing exotic stuff—financial products that use derivatives or leverage, as demand grows for anything with a hint a extra yield. John Detrixhe, Quartz, "With interest rates near record lows, retirement may have to wait," 15 Oct. 2020 These petrified sand dunes add a touch of the exotic in this intimate place. Roger Naylor, The Arizona Republic, "5 of the best fall hikes in Arizona: Here's how to explore these less crowded trails," 14 Oct. 2020 Young vervet monkeys are sometimes sold on the exotic animal market while adults are kept for breeding, Williams said. Chris Perkins, sun-sentinel.com, "A one-armed monkey and her baby are missing from their South Florida colony, and foul play is suspected," 1 Oct. 2020 Making money in DeFi not only requires a familiarity with an exotic market, but a high degree of technical savvy. Jeff John Roberts, Fortune, "Crypto soars again as traders embrace ‘DeFi’ and ‘yield farming’—but some see echoes of the 2017 bubble," 25 Aug. 2020 Siegfried Fischbacher and Roy Horn retired after Horn was injured by a tiger in 2003, but in their day, the illusionists blended smoke and lasers, sequined costumes and exotic animals in their glitzy Las Vegas show. Stephanie Reynolds, chicagotribune.com, "Dream moderators for the next presidential debate: From Judge Judy to Jerry Springer," 30 Sep. 2020 Nordstrom plans to clear its racks of furs and products made with skins from exotic animals, including alligators, kangaroos and snakes, by the end of 2021. Kate Gibson, CBS News, "Nordstrom to stop selling fur and exotic animal skin products," 29 Sep. 2020 For those looking for more exotic pets, chickens can offer not only companionship, but also benefits such as egg production, soil fertilization, and educational opportunities to help forge the connection between farm and table. Texas A&m University, Houston Chronicle, "PET TALK: Chickens can be pets, but they also have other benefits," 26 Sep. 2020 What touched me, on this millionth time walking through the rooms, was the care that the Ancient Egyptians took of their dead, which no longer seemed exotic or superstitious but noble nearly beyond belief. Alexandra Schwartz, The New Yorker, "The Met Is Back, and So Are We," 1 Sep. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Asian giant hornets could also have deadly impacts on pollinators like native bee species, many of which are already suffering from competition with other exotics, Looney says. National Geographic, "THE BEST OF NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC DELIVERED TO YOUR INBOX," 4 May 2020 Use both in exotics along with Winning Impression and My Friends Beer. Los Angeles Times, "Horse racing newsletter: Santa Anita shoots for May 15 re-opening," 1 May 2020 Azaleas fall into two camps: Natives are indigenous to parts of the U.S. and lose their leaves in winter; exotics are evergreens that come primarily from Japan, and most are hybrids. Southern Living Editors, Southern Living, "7 Deadly Azalea Mistakes You Should Avoid," 22 May 2020 But the couple did not share his passion and shipped off some of his exotics to the Jardin des Plantes, the national botanical garden in Paris, where their descendants flourish today. Kathleen Beckett, New York Times, "Marie Antoinette Would Be Proud," 6 Apr. 2020 But there’s eye candy, including exotics, which are roped off, and the chance to get up close and personal with the latest current models, everything from Ford to Jaguar to Cadillac to Toyota. Eric D. Lawrence, Detroit Free Press, "New Novi auto show not a replacement for Detroit show, but you can see cars, even exotics," 4 Jan. 2020 Her son, Nikko, 11, loves exotics, so Fotion was unhappy that those were off-limits. Eric D. Lawrence, Detroit Free Press, "New Novi auto show not a replacement for Detroit show, but you can see cars, even exotics," 4 Jan. 2020 Prices for the base version will start at about $60,000 compared to $200,000 or much more for European exotics. Peter Valdes-dapena, CNN, "The new Corvette is named MotorTrend Car of the Year," 18 Nov. 2019 Herbs and salad leaves, including exotics such as Genovese basil and Peruvian mint, are resupplied with seedlings from the company’s nursery as the mature plants are picked. The Economist, "New ways to make vertical farming stack up," 29 Aug. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'exotic.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of exotic

Adjective

1599, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun

1645, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for exotic

Adjective

Latin exoticus, from Greek exōtikos, from exō

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Time Traveler for exotic

Time Traveler

The first known use of exotic was in 1599

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Statistics for exotic

Last Updated

22 Oct 2020

Cite this Entry

“Exotic.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/exotic. Accessed 26 Oct. 2020.

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More Definitions for exotic

exotic

adjective
How to pronounce exotic (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of exotic

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: very different, strange, or unusual
of a plant or animal : not living or growing naturally in a particular area : from another part of the world

exotic

noun

English Language Learners Definition of exotic (Entry 2 of 2)

: a plant or animal that does not live or grow naturally in a particular area

exotic

adjective
ex·​ot·​ic | \ ig-ˈzä-tik How to pronounce exotic (audio) \

Kids Definition of exotic

1 : very different, strange, or unusual
2 : introduced from another country : not native exotic plants

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Comments on exotic

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