exotic

adjective
ex·​ot·​ic | \ ig-ˈzä-tik How to pronounce exotic (audio) \

Definition of exotic

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : introduced from another country : not native to the place where found exotic plants
2 archaic : foreign, alien
3 : strikingly, excitingly, or mysteriously different or unusual exotic flavors
4 : of or relating to striptease exotic dancing

exotic

noun

Definition of exotic (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : one (such as a plant or animal) that is exotic

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Other Words from exotic

Adjective

exotically \ ig-​ˈzä-​ti-​k(ə-​)lē How to pronounce exotically (audio) \ adverb
exoticness \ ig-​ˈzä-​tik-​nəs How to pronounce exoticness (audio) \ noun

Examples of exotic in a Sentence

Adjective She's known for her exotic tastes. the gradual disappearance of exotic lands in a culturally homogenized world Noun Some native species are being crowded out by exotics. the botanical garden boasts an array of horticultural exotics from around the world
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Many pre-pandemic activities seem exotic now: cramming myself onto a bus, sweating in a packed spin class, splitting an entree at a restaurant, dancing shoulder-to-shoulder at a large, joyous wedding reception. Nicole Nguyen, WSJ, "Our Habits Have Changed. These Gadgets Are Proof.," 24 May 2020 All new interior with exotic cabinetry and polished granite floors Contact: Jeff Barker or Matt Barker, Max Broock Realtors, 248-425-6000. Judy Rose, Detroit Free Press, "A look inside Matthew Stafford's $6.5M lakeside home reveals more than even we expected," 23 May 2020 But for now most of the excitement will be about new direct-to-consumer business models, rather than new types of exotic liquor. The Economist, "Schumpeter Farewell for now to a golden age of drinking," 23 May 2020 With Mykael Wright pushing for more playing time, Jevon Holland capable of playing inside and deep safety and the possibility of more exotic personnel packages, Graham Jr. could be asked to do more than before during his senior season. oregonlive, "How many different roles will Thomas Graham Jr. play in Oregon’s secondary in 2020?," 22 May 2020 Yet prosperity, too, drives the demand for wild animals, as high-end exotic wildlife restaurants around the world demonstrate. Jerry Martin, STAT, "The growing global appetite for meat increases the risk of future ‘spillover’ pandemics. We can do something about it," 21 May 2020 China is taking steps to stop the consumption of exotic animal meat. Benjamin Vanhoose, PEOPLE.com, "China to Offer Buy-Outs to Farmers Raising Exotic Animals for Human Consumption: Report," 19 May 2020 Chinese authorities point to an exotic meat market as the most likely source. Paul Cobler, Dallas News, "Texas GOP Congressmen urge sanctions against Chinese officials over coronavirus response," 18 May 2020 Vote-by-mail isn’t some exotic, new electoral practice; it’s been tried and tested for years. Natalie Gontcharova, refinery29.com, "Trump’s Attack On Mail-In Voting Could Hurt Republicans More," 15 May 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun But the couple did not share his passion and shipped off some of his exotics to the Jardin des Plantes, the national botanical garden in Paris, where their descendants flourish today. Kathleen Beckett, New York Times, "Marie Antoinette Would Be Proud," 6 Apr. 2020 But there’s eye candy, including exotics, which are roped off, and the chance to get up close and personal with the latest current models, everything from Ford to Jaguar to Cadillac to Toyota. Eric D. Lawrence, Detroit Free Press, "New Novi auto show not a replacement for Detroit show, but you can see cars, even exotics," 4 Jan. 2020 Her son, Nikko, 11, loves exotics, so Fotion was unhappy that those were off-limits. Eric D. Lawrence, Detroit Free Press, "New Novi auto show not a replacement for Detroit show, but you can see cars, even exotics," 4 Jan. 2020 Prices for the base version will start at about $60,000 compared to $200,000 or much more for European exotics. Peter Valdes-dapena, CNN, "The new Corvette is named MotorTrend Car of the Year," 18 Nov. 2019 Herbs and salad leaves, including exotics such as Genovese basil and Peruvian mint, are resupplied with seedlings from the company’s nursery as the mature plants are picked. The Economist, "New ways to make vertical farming stack up," 29 Aug. 2019 In 2016, the Feline Conservation Federation, which advocates for private ownership, used public records and sources in the exotics community to come up with 2,330 tigers. oregonlive.com, "The trouble with tigers in America," 13 July 2019 The brewery website lists 15 brews available on tap, including exotics such as Jester, a Sour Golden Ale with mango and habanero. al.com, "Coastal beer boom: New breweries opening soon in Mobile," 7 July 2019 Helmus found that his new data did indeed follow what the model predicted; the islands with the fewest natives gained the most exotics. Quanta Magazine, "Lizard Stowaways Revise Principle of Ecology," 24 Sep. 2014

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'exotic.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of exotic

Adjective

1599, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun

1645, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for exotic

Adjective

Latin exoticus, from Greek exōtikos, from exō

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Time Traveler for exotic

Time Traveler

The first known use of exotic was in 1599

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Statistics for exotic

Last Updated

27 May 2020

Cite this Entry

“Exotic.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/exotic. Accessed 28 May. 2020.

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More Definitions for exotic

exotic

adjective
How to pronounce exotic (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of exotic

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: very different, strange, or unusual
of a plant or animal : not living or growing naturally in a particular area : from another part of the world

exotic

noun

English Language Learners Definition of exotic (Entry 2 of 2)

: a plant or animal that does not live or grow naturally in a particular area

exotic

adjective
ex·​ot·​ic | \ ig-ˈzä-tik How to pronounce exotic (audio) \

Kids Definition of exotic

1 : very different, strange, or unusual
2 : introduced from another country : not native exotic plants

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More from Merriam-Webster on exotic

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for exotic

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with exotic

Spanish Central: Translation of exotic

Nglish: Translation of exotic for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of exotic for Arabic Speakers

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