exotic

1 of 2

adjective

ex·​ot·​ic ig-ˈzä-tik How to pronounce exotic (audio)
1
: introduced from another country : not native to the place where found
exotic plants
exotic species creating havoc when introduced into new environments.Chemical & Engineering News
2
: strikingly, excitingly, or mysteriously different or unusual
exotic flavors
Until very recently the alpaca was an exotic sight at county fairs and petting zoos in the metropolitan region.Glenn Collins
3
: of or relating to striptease : involving or featuring exotic dancers
exotic dancing
an exotic nightclub
4
archaic : foreign, alien
exotically adverb
exoticness noun

exotic

2 of 2

noun

plural exotics
1
: one (such as a plant or animal) that is exotic
2
3

Examples of exotic in a Sentence

Adjective She's known for her exotic tastes. the gradual disappearance of exotic lands in a culturally homogenized world Noun Some native species are being crowded out by exotics. the botanical garden boasts an array of horticultural exotics from around the world
Recent Examples on the Web
Adjective
Granted, both that 1984 movie and this one feature a successful but perhaps mousy author being confronted with the exotic (and dangerous) adventures about which she’s written, but the similarities pretty much end there. Brian Lowry, CNN, 1 Feb. 2024 Even paint colors can be exotic: The Pantone Color Institute noted that the Spring 2014 color forecast included inspirations from travels abroad, leading to colors such as Radiant Orchid, Celosia Orange and Sand. Charlotte Observer, 1 Feb. 2024 On top of all that, Miami Design District Concours will be showing off 100 post-war vintage, sports, exotic, and supercars. Clilly, Miami Herald, 30 Jan. 2024 This world of pseudorandom numbers is exotic and full of open problems. Christopher Lutsko, Scientific American, 30 Jan. 2024 Another Pooch Palace called Lime Lattice has an exotic flavor. Elaine Markoutsas, Kansas City Star, 30 Jan. 2024 In Sinaloa, Mexico, home to one of the world’s most powerful drug cartels and famed for ostentatious displays of wealth, people clamor for exotic animals. Ryan Fonseca, Los Angeles Times, 18 Jan. 2024 Highlights include an agility course, on-site adoptions and a beauty contest with several hundred exotic cats from across the country. The San Diego Union-Tribune Staff, San Diego Union-Tribune, 24 Jan. 2024 Then there was the zoo where people could see exotic creatures. Susan Young, Peoplemag, 24 Jan. 2024
Noun
The event highlights a diverse array of vehicles, ranging from classic cars to modern exotics. San Diego Union-Tribune, 21 Jan. 2024 In Brazil, municipal nurseries bypass profitable exotics to prioritize native trees and in Togo, hairdressers are being trained to provide counseling for clients. Cameron Pugh, The Christian Science Monitor, 9 Jan. 2024 Officials ordered him to temporarily re-home his exotics. Maura Judkis, Washington Post, 23 Oct. 2023 But Holly did not obtain the permits required by Prince George’s animal control to have exotics in the county, officials said. Katie Mettler, Washington Post, 25 Oct. 2023 In the end, said Lena, the makeup was used only to make white actresses who played exotics, such as Hedy Lamarr in White Cargo (1942), intentionally darker. Donald Bogle, The Hollywood Reporter, 12 Oct. 2023 Flitting about like the monarchs the area is famous for are streams of classics and exotics sporting one-of-a-kind bodywork and rare engine options. Car and Driver, 16 Aug. 2023 Many Italian exotics weren't officially sold in the U.S. in the 1980s, and gray market importing frequently involved a little hustling. Brendan McAleer, Car and Driver, 8 July 2023 Sergio, a supercar collector who wishes to keep his last name anonymous, counts a panoply of classic and modern-day exotics in his stable. Basem Wasef, Robb Report, 7 July 2023 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'exotic.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Adjective

Latin exoticus, from Greek exōtikos, from exō

First Known Use

Adjective

1600, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun

1670, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of exotic was in 1600

Dictionary Entries Near exotic

Cite this Entry

“Exotic.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/exotic. Accessed 20 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

exotic

1 of 2 adjective
ex·​ot·​ic ig-ˈzät-ik How to pronounce exotic (audio)
1
: introduced from another country
exotic plants
2
: very different or unusual
exotic colors
exotically adverb
exoticness noun

exotic

2 of 2 noun
: something (as a plant) that is exotic

More from Merriam-Webster on exotic

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