episcopal

1 of 2

adjective

epis·​co·​pal i-ˈpi-skə-pəl How to pronounce episcopal (audio)
-bəl
1
: of or relating to a bishop
2
: of, having, or constituting government by bishops
3
capitalized : of or relating to the Protestant Episcopal Church representing the Anglican communion in the U.S.
episcopally adverb

Episcopal

2 of 2

noun

Examples of episcopal in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web
Adjective
The lime-green Met Gala look, May 2018 Photography Shutterstock Miuccia wasn’t about episcopal tailoring or a gilded colour palette for 2018’s Met Gala, themed Heavenly Bodies and the Catholic Imagination. Julia Hobbs, Vogue, 13 Feb. 2024 Congregations have been disaffiliating by vote in individual episcopal area conferences, and more than 4,000 congregations have already disaffiliated under the law, including 71 previously in Kentucky. Caleb Wiegandt, The Courier-Journal, 5 June 2023 By leaving the episcopal ring on Archinto’s finger outside the curtain, Titian emphasizes his right to the position. Washington Post, 20 July 2023 Congregations also disaffiliate by vote in individual episcopal area conferences. Caleb Wiegandt, The Courier-Journal, 7 June 2023 Established and state-regulated by the late fourth century, Christian sanctuary was based in episcopal intercession and penitential discipline; it was intended to spare the body the worst consequences of crime and thereby to save the soul from the everlasting implications of sin. Rafil Kroll-Zaidi, The New York Review of Books, 3 Nov. 2020 While Barron's episcopal office concerns his parishes in Minnesota — where he is already widely known — his public influence stretches around the world via his books, videos, radio shows and documentaries with his Word on Fire ministries. Fox News, 28 Aug. 2022 Whitehead got out of the car, wearing a Fendi blazer and a large episcopal ruby ring. Eric Lach, The New Yorker, 14 Jan. 2023 These prohibitions weren’t very effective; a thousand years later, astrologers were active at the papal and episcopal courts, and within the entourages of numerous Christian rulers. Andrew Cockburn, Harper’s Magazine , 6 Jan. 2023
Noun
Additional events at Westwood Town Hall, West Side Brewing, Mount Airy Forest, Gloria Dei Lutheran Church, St. James Episcopal, and Pilgrim United Church of Christ. Luann Gibbs, The Enquirer, 14 July 2024 On May 22, 2023, Ridenour set St. Stephen’s Episcopal and First Presbyterian churches in Douglas on fire. Lux Butler, The Arizona Republic, 12 July 2024 Noon Monday-Saturday, St. Richard’s Episcopal Church 5151 Lake Howell Road, Winter Park, free, 407-619-5333, orlandobridgeclub.org. Knitting/Crochet Classes: All ages and skill levels are welcome! Joe Rassel, Orlando Sentinel, 11 July 2024 Jackson is the rector of Trinity Church Wall Street, an Episcopal parish in downtown Manhattan. Phillip A. Jackson, New York Daily News, 11 July 2024 In addition to her husband, she is survived by a son, Jack Stanley, of Homeland; a daughter, Hannah Stanley, of Philadelphia; her stepmother, Diana Luck, an Episcopal deacon, of Dallas; and a brother, the Rev. Thomas Luck, an Episcopal priest, of Fredericksburg, Texas. Frederick N. Rasmussen, Baltimore Sun, 10 July 2024 The Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem, which helps operate al-Ahli hospital, said drones fired around it on Sunday evening and that those inside were forced to flee. Hazem Balousha, Washington Post, 9 July 2024 The Sealy window at Trinity Episcopal Church in downtown Galveston was given as a gift to the church in 1905. Stephanie Gallman Jordan, Southern Living, 7 July 2024 His daughter Charlotte was married in the Episcopal church in 1833, according to church records and as posted by Lowry on Facebook. Sydney Bishop, CNN, 7 July 2024

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'episcopal.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Adjective

Middle English, from Late Latin episcopalis, from episcopus bishop — more at bishop

First Known Use

Adjective

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun

1752, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of episcopal was in the 15th century

Dictionary Entries Near episcopal

Cite this Entry

“Episcopal.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/episcopal. Accessed 17 Jul. 2024.

Kids Definition

episcopal

adjective
epis·​co·​pal i-ˈpis-kə-pəl How to pronounce episcopal (audio)
1
: of or relating to a bishop or episcopacy
2
capitalized : of or relating to the Protestant Episcopal Church
episcopally adverb
Etymology

Adjective

derived from Latin episcopus "bishop," from Greek episkopos, literally, "overseer," from epi- "over" and skopos "watcher, goal, object" — related to bishop, horoscope, scope see Word History at bishop

Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!