endow

verb
en·​dow | \ in-ˈdau̇ How to pronounce endow (audio) , en-\
endowed; endowing; endows

Definition of endow

transitive verb

1 : to furnish with an income especially : to make a grant of money providing for the continuing support or maintenance of endow a hospital
2 : to furnish with a dower
3 : to provide with something freely or naturally endowed with a good sense of humor

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Synonyms for endow

Synonyms

bless, endue (or indue), favor, gift, invest

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Examples of endow in a Sentence

The wealthy couple endowed a new wing of the hospital. She plans to endow a faculty position at the university. The money will be used to endow the museum and research facility.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Turkey is endowed with formidable economic strengths — a relatively young population of about 80 million, a growing middle class, a location at the crossroads of Europe and Asia and glorious scenery underpinning a major tourism industry. Peter S. Goodman, New York Times, "For Erdogan, the Bill for Turkey’s Debt-Fueled Growth Comes Due," 24 June 2019 Preachers began to tell anecdotes about deceitful Jewish misers who consorted with the devil; artists began to visualize such tales in grotesque and frightening detail, endowing their Jewish villains with distinctively fleshy and bestial features. Sara Lipton, The New York Review of Books, "A Terribly Durable Myth," 17 June 2019 Linder creates characters richly endowed with animosity: Aimé Donna Kelly in particular offers an incisive portrait of outrage barely under wraps as Ayesha, a mother of three who is not happy to learn the circumstances of Laurel’s pregnancy. Peter Marks, Washington Post, "I’m not rejoicing over a play produced by the Kennedy Center. Here’s why.," 13 June 2019 Slender and endowed with an open, expressive face the camera loves, Fails is a natural on the screen, exuding a beatific presence that earns immediate empathy. The Washington Post, The Mercury News, "Review: ‘Last Black Man’ is a lyrical, beautiful ode to loss," 13 June 2019 Eurasia’s horizontal axis allowed plants and germs to spread easily along latitudinal belts, endowing its inhabitants with large populations, powerful technologies, and fiercely contagious diseases (useful weapons in colonizing foreign lands). Daniel Immerwahr, The New Republic, "All Over the Map," 11 June 2019 Played by Doctor Foster star Suranne Jones, the character is based on the real-life Lister, a lesbian landowner in nineteenth-century England endowed with the gift of gab who kept meticulous diaries about her life. Jill Gutowitz, Glamour, "Gentleman Jack Is a Period Drama I’ve Been Waiting My Whole Life to See," 22 Apr. 2019 But imagine a cartoon replica of yourself — endowed with Charlie Chaplin’s gifts for physical comedy and a 13-year-old YouTuber’s choreographic repertoire — standing on your desk, or in your bed or on your Labradoodle. Reggie Ugwu, New York Times, "At Snapchat, Redrawing the Bounds of Reality," 14 June 2018 Michel Roux, a Frenchman who got his start in the hotel industry and once worked as a dishwasher, pulled off the remarkable feat of endowing vodka with snob appeal. James R. Hagerty, WSJ, "Michel Roux Gave Snob Appeal to Vodka With Ever-Changing Absolut Ads," 17 May 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'endow.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of endow

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for endow

Middle English, from Anglo-French endower, from en- + dower, douer to endow, from Latin dotare, from dot-, dos gift, dowry — more at date

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Statistics for endow

Last Updated

4 Jul 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for endow

The first known use of endow was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for endow

endow

verb

English Language Learners Definition of endow

: to give a large amount of money to a school, hospital, etc., in order to pay for the creation or continuing support of (something)
: to freely or naturally provide (someone or something) with something

endow

verb
en·​dow | \ in-ˈdau̇ How to pronounce endow (audio) \
endowed; endowing

Kids Definition of endow

1 : to provide with money for support The millionaire endowed a scholarship.
2 : to provide with something freely or naturally Humans are endowed with reason.
en·​dow | \ in-ˈdau̇ How to pronounce endow (audio) \

Legal Definition of endow

: to furnish with income especially : to make a grant of money providing for the continuing support or maintenance of a scholarship endowed by the testator

History and Etymology for endow

Anglo-French endower, from Old French en-, prefix stressing completion + douer to endow, from Latin dotare, from dot-, dos gift, dowry

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More from Merriam-Webster on endow

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with endow

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for endow

Spanish Central: Translation of endow

Nglish: Translation of endow for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of endow for Arabic Speakers

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