emerald

1 of 2

noun

em·​er·​ald ˈem-rəld How to pronounce emerald (audio)
ˈe-mə-
1
: a rich green variety of beryl prized as a gemstone
2
: any of various green gemstones (such as synthetic corundum or demantoid)

emerald

2 of 2

adjective

: brightly or richly green

Did you know?

Highly valued as gemstones, emeralds are a grass-green variety of beryl. The capacity of emeralds to deflect light and to break white light into its component colors is not high, so cut stones display little brilliancy or fire (flashes of color). The color that gives this gem its value comes from the presence of small amounts of chromium. The most important production of fine-quality gem material is Colombia; emeralds are also mined in Russia, Australia, South Africa, and Zimbabwe. Synthetic emeralds are identical to natural crystals and may rival them in color and beauty.

Example Sentences

Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
Sporting a black and emerald-green mini dress, Lambert wore a BMI medal around her neck and accessorized with hoop earrings. Shafiq Najib, Peoplemag, 9 Nov. 2022 In the high desert of Arizona, emerald-green fields stretch for miles alongside dry tumbleweeds and Saguaro cactus. Ella Nilsen, CNN, 5 Nov. 2022 The Eastern Shore widow of a chicken magnate plans to sell an emerald from a 400-year-old Spanish shipwreck to stop the trafficking of Ukrainian refugees. Cassidy Jensen, Baltimore Sun, 2 Nov. 2022 The fabled emerald will be on public exhibition at Sotheby’s York Avenue galleries starting November 30 as a part of its Luxury Weeks sales series. Dana Givens, Robb Report, 2 Nov. 2022 The emerald Ash borer is prohibited in Michigan and detected in Michigan's Upper Penisula but established in Michigan's Lower Penisula. Chandra Fleming, Detroit Free Press, 29 Oct. 2022 Murphy, especially lovely for the way her red hair amplified the emerald sheen in her dress, is a restrained, innately cool kind of dancer. Gia Kourlas, New York Times, 28 Oct. 2022 The polarized lenses registered at 224.4 Lux in our light test, and the emerald tint accents ambers and greens while dulling the light pleasantly. Car and Driver, 24 Oct. 2022 According to Vogue, Green wore an emerald tuxedo from Rich Fresh, while Renee wore a custom Ines Di Santo ball gown for the ceremony. Sydni Ellis, Peoplemag, 18 Oct. 2022
Adjective
At the Lajitas Golf Resort, on an emerald course shimmering in the Chihuahuan Desert, the duffers and ringers were teeing off each morning last week. John Maccormack, San Antonio Express-News, 1 June 2020 The legends speak of a garden and mountains and seas and emerald stones. Sam Sacks, WSJ, 31 Jan. 2020 From her sleek looped updo to her bedazzled emerald gown, our eyes admittedly went to her hot-pink lipstick first. Aimee Simeon, refinery29.com, 20 Jan. 2020 Kate, who wore a flowing teal and emerald maxi dress by ARoss Girl x Soler and ceramic drop earrings by Pakistani designer Zeen, and William stepped out on Wednesday to visit the Aga Khan Centre in London. Erin Hill, PEOPLE.com, 2 Oct. 2019 In the company of a guide, wind your way through seemingly infinite terraces of cascading emerald rice paddies to a Red Dao village and stop to visit the home of one of the resident families and learn about their daily life. National Geographic, 24 Apr. 2019 Browse local crafts at artisan markets, visit the seventh-century Kyichu Lhakhang temple, and hike through emerald rice fields that blanket the valley floor. National Geographic, 20 Sep. 2019 There are live sets by Mexico’s Sainte Vie, Berlin and Lima collective Feathered Sun, and Satori who laid down a simmering multi-instrumental session at the head of an expansive, emerald pool. Nicolas Stecher, Billboard, 22 Oct. 2019 Queen Mary, played in the film by Geraldine Jones, wears a replica of the Duchess Vladimir diamond and emerald tiara. Stellene Volandes, Town & Country, 29 Sep. 2019 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'emerald.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

Word History

Etymology

Noun

Middle English emerallde, from Anglo-French esmeralde, from Vulgar Latin *smaralda, from Latin smaragdus, from Greek smaragdos — more at smaragd

First Known Use

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Adjective

1508, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of emerald was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near emerald

Cite this Entry

“Emerald.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/emerald. Accessed 30 Nov. 2022.

Kids Definition

emerald 1 of 2

noun

em·​er·​ald ˈem-(ə-)rəld How to pronounce emerald (audio)
: a rich green gem

emerald

2 of 2

adjective

: brightly or richly green

More from Merriam-Webster on emerald

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