embody

verb
em·​body | \ im-ˈbä-dē How to pronounce embody (audio) \
embodied; embodying

Definition of embody

transitive verb

1 : to give a body to (a spirit) : incarnate
2a : to deprive of spirituality
b : to make concrete and perceptible
3 : to cause to become a body or part of a body : incorporate
4 : to represent in human or animal form : personify men who greatly embodied the idealism of American life— A. M. Schlesinger born 1917

Other Words from embody

embodier noun

Examples of embody in a Sentence

The legislature embodied a revenue provision in the new law. they must embody their ideas in substantial institutions if they are to survive
Recent Examples on the Web And in Kryvyi Rih, where people have monitored Zelensky’s rise from local boy to star comedian to surprising presidential hopeful to brave wartime leader, Zelensky has come to embody the steel city’s blue-collar strength. Washington Post, 21 Apr. 2022 Morton has come to embody the north-south way of pitching, baiting hitters at the top and bottom edges of the strike zone with high fastballs and diving curves. New York Times, 21 Mar. 2022 Facial recognition has come to embody privacy and human rights concerns that have led more than a dozen major US cities to ban use of the technology. Khari Johnson, Wired, 2 Nov. 2021 More so than any of his teammates, quarterback Cade McNamara has come to embody the careful, conscientious approach that has allowed Michigan to negotiate a quick turnaround following its rough 2020 season. Rainer Sabin, Detroit Free Press, 5 Oct. 2021 The conversion of the building in Kabul, the country’s capital, suggested at least a symbolic slapping down of a ministry that had come to embody the ascent of women in Afghanistan after the Taliban were ousted from power in 2001. BostonGlobe.com, 18 Sep. 2021 All three actresses embody their roles with ease, and certainly Davis’ excellent take on Obama will have audiences talking. Kelly Lawler, USA TODAY, 17 Mar. 2022 The relationship between data collection and usage is only symbiotic if certain principles are in place to embody such a culture. Tooba Durraze, Forbes, 3 Jan. 2022 The ragged, wrinkled faces of Giacometti’s portraits, particularly those of his wife, Annette Arm, and his brother, Diego, embody a notion of beauty based on lived experience. Steven Litt, cleveland, 20 Mar. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'embody.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of embody

circa 1548, in the meaning defined at sense 1

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Time Traveler for embody

Time Traveler

The first known use of embody was circa 1548

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Dictionary Entries Near embody

embodiment

embody

embog

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Statistics for embody

Last Updated

30 Apr 2022

Cite this Entry

“Embody.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/embody. Accessed 17 May. 2022.

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More Definitions for embody

embody

verb
em·​body | \ im-ˈbä-dē How to pronounce embody (audio) \
embodied; embodying

Kids Definition of embody

1 : to give form to The poet embodied her ideas in words.
2 : to represent in visible form The firefighters embodied courage during the disaster.
3 : to make something a body or system or part of a body or system The basic law of the United States is embodied in its constitution.

More from Merriam-Webster on embody

Nglish: Translation of embody for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of embody for Arabic Speakers

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