electromagnetism

noun
elec·​tro·​mag·​ne·​tism | \ i-ˌlek-trō-ˈmag-nə-ˌti-zəm How to pronounce electromagnetism (audio) \

Definition of electromagnetism

1 : magnetism developed by a current of electricity
2a : a fundamental physical force that is responsible for interactions between charged particles which occur because of their charge and for the emission and absorption of photons, that is about a hundredth the strength of the strong force, and that extends over infinite distances but is dominant over atomic and molecular distances

called also electromagnetic force

— compare gravity sense 3a(2), strong force, weak force
b : a branch of physical science that deals with the physical relations between electricity and magnetism

Examples of electromagnetism in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Now physicists seek a single theory that fuses general relativity, which describes gravity, with quantum field theory, which accounts for electromagnetism and the nuclear forces. John Horgan, Scientific American, 25 June 2021 These use electromagnetism to directly heat up a pan, rather than getting an element hot through electrical resistance and then heating up the pan that way. Ryan Cooper, The Week, 14 Sep. 2021 There are fields associated with fundamental particles like electrons and quarks, and fields associated with fundamental forces, like gravity and electromagnetism. Quanta Magazine, 24 June 2021 Some physicists insist that everything, including humanity, is ultimately explicable in terms of particles pushed and pulled by gravity, electromagnetism and other forces. John Horgan, Scientific American, 3 Sep. 2021 Gauge theory had been developed in the 19th century by James Clerk Maxwell, a British physicist, in his seminal work to explain electromagnetism. BostonGlobe.com, 27 July 2021 To describe electromagnetism, a gauge group known as U(1) was introduced, and this is still used at the present. Ethan Siegel, Forbes, 3 Sep. 2021 Gauge theory had been developed in the 19th century by James Clerk Maxwell, a British physicist, in his seminal work to explain electromagnetism. BostonGlobe.com, 27 July 2021 Gauge theory had been developed in the 19th century by James Clerk Maxwell, a British physicist, in his seminal work to explain electromagnetism. BostonGlobe.com, 27 July 2021 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'electromagnetism.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of electromagnetism

1821, in the meaning defined at sense 2

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Time Traveler for electromagnetism

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The first known use of electromagnetism was in 1821

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Dictionary Entries Near electromagnetism

electromagnetic wave

electromagnetism

electromechanical

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Last Updated

7 Apr 2022

Cite this Entry

“Electromagnetism.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/electromagnetism. Accessed 28 May. 2022.

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More Definitions for electromagnetism

electromagnetism

noun
elec·​tro·​mag·​ne·​tism | \ i-ˌlek-trō-ˈmag-nə-ˌtiz-əm How to pronounce electromagnetism (audio) \

Medical Definition of electromagnetism

1 : magnetism developed by a current of electricity
2 : physics dealing with the relations between electricity and magnetism

More from Merriam-Webster on electromagnetism

Nglish: Translation of electromagnetism for Spanish Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about electromagnetism

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