dystonia

noun
dys·​to·​nia | \ dis-ˈtō-nē-ə How to pronounce dystonia (audio) \

Definition of dystonia

: any of various conditions (such as Parkinson's disease and torticollis) characterized by abnormalities of movement and muscle tone

Other Words from dystonia

dystonic \ dis-​ˈtä-​nik How to pronounce dystonia (audio) \ adjective

Examples of dystonia in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web In 1997, the FDA gave its first green light to deep brain stimulation as a treatment for tremor, and then for Parkinson’s in 2002 and the movement disorder dystonia in 2003. Isabella Cueto, STAT, 14 Jan. 2022 His sister Kendra Marcus said the cause was dystonia. Annabelle Williams, New York Times, 28 Dec. 2021 The legendary puppeteer lived for some time with dystonia, which causes involuntary muscle contractions, the Sesame Workshop said in a statement. Washington Post, 9 Dec. 2019 Following her flu and respiratory episodes recently in the emergency room, she's been experiencing new neurological symptoms, including dystonia, a movement disorder. Ryan Prior, CNN, 7 May 2020 The legendary puppeteer lived for some time with dystonia, which causes involuntary muscle contractions, the Sesame Workshop said in a statement. Washington Post, 9 Dec. 2019 The legendary puppeteer lived for some time with dystonia, which causes involuntary muscle contractions, the Sesame Workshop said in a statement. Washington Post, 9 Dec. 2019 The cause of dystonia isn't known, but some forms are inherited, states Mayo Clinic. Claire Gillespie, Health.com, 9 Dec. 2019 Spinney, who also operated and voiced Oscar, Big Bird's grumpy trash can-dwelling neighbor, before retiring from the iconic kids program in October 2018, died at his home in Connecticut after living with dystonia for some time. Lisa De Los Reyes, Billboard, 8 Dec. 2019 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'dystonia.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of dystonia

1860, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for dystonia

borrowed from German Dystonie, from dys- dys- + -tonie -tonia

Note: Though dystonia appears in polyglot medial lexica in the 19th century, the use of the word to refer to a specific condition probably dates from the German neurologist Hermann Oppenheim's application of Dystonie to the condition he named dystonia musculorum deformans in the article "Über eine eigenartige Krampfkrankheit des kindlichen und jugendlichen Alters (dysbasia lordotica progressiva, dystonia musculorum deformans)," Neurologisches Centralblatt, Band 30 (1911), pp. 1090-1107.

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The first known use of dystonia was in 1860

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dystocia

dystonia

dystopia

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Cite this Entry

“Dystonia.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/dystonia. Accessed 7 Jul. 2022.

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More Definitions for dystonia

dystonia

noun
dys·​to·​nia | \ dis-ˈtō-nē-ə How to pronounce dystonia (audio) \

Medical Definition of dystonia

: a state of disordered tonicity of tissues (as of muscle)

Other Words from dystonia

dystonic \ -​ˈtän-​ik How to pronounce dystonia (audio) \ adjective

More from Merriam-Webster on dystonia

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about dystonia

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