dynamite

noun
dy·​na·​mite | \ ˈdī-nə-ˌmīt How to pronounce dynamite (audio) \

Definition of dynamite

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : an explosive that is made of nitroglycerin absorbed in a porous material and that often contains ammonium nitrate or cellulose nitrate also : an explosive (such as a mixture of ammonium nitrate and nitrocellulose) that contains no nitroglycerin
2 : one that has a powerful effect an actress who's dynamite at the box office also : something that has great potential to cause trouble or conflict an issue regarded as political dynamite

dynamite

verb
dynamited; dynamiting

Definition of dynamite (Entry 2 of 3)

transitive verb

1 : to blow up with dynamite
2 : to cause the failure or destruction of

dynamite

adjective

Definition of dynamite (Entry 3 of 3)

: terrific, wonderful a dynamite performance

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Other Words from dynamite

Noun

dynamitic \ ˌdī-​nə-​ˈmi-​tik How to pronounce dynamitic (audio) \ adjective

Verb

dynamiter noun

Examples of dynamite in a Sentence

Noun The death penalty is political dynamite. Verb They plan to dynamite the old building. Adjective They put on a dynamite performance. a summer blockbuster that features some really dynamite special effects
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Urrutia's film aches with urgency and questions that don't have easy answers, and Henry and Hernández are dynamite together on screen. Jeva Lange, TheWeek, "7 films to watch from the all-online edition of the SXSW Film Festival," 27 Apr. 2020 In Fairfax, Virginia, in 1929, roving bands of boys set off dynamite on their school grounds. Gillian Brockell, Anchorage Daily News, "The frightening history of Halloween haunted houses," 31 Oct. 2019 The Finnish YouTubers who make up Beyond the Press tried to turn dynamite into an extension cord. Caroline Delbert, Popular Mechanics, "Watch These Guys Cook Dynamite Like a Sausage," 16 Apr. 2020 One of the most notorious attacks at a place of worship was the 1963 bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, where Ku Klux Klan members detonated dynamite, killing four children and injuring 22 people. Reis Thebault, Anchorage Daily News, "Too small to hire guards, too worried to go gun-free, community churches are now arming themselves," 17 Feb. 2020 For now, though, the issue remains political dynamite. David Meyer, Fortune, "How Germany’s ‘Black Zero’ Could Bring Angela Merkel’s Government to a Premature End," 12 Dec. 2019 The day an undefeated Power Five champion doesn’t make the final four is the day the offended conference takes dynamite to the four-team playoff. Teddy Greenstein, chicagotribune.com, "5 things we learned about Big Ten football after Week 10, including trick plays are fun and Illinois-Northwestern will matter. Plus, our updated power rankings.," 4 Nov. 2019 Will Harris got a dynamite defensive play from Brantley in left, garnering memories of Andrew Benintendi’s game-ending catch during the Red Sox’ ALCS win last season. Chandler Rome, Houston Chronicle, "José Altuve's walkoff homer sends Astros to World Series," 19 Oct. 2019 In the new one, they are surrounded by rows of matching houses and mountain slopes ravaged by dynamite. The Economist, "A dam threatens one of the world’s oldest settlements," 26 Sep. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb In March 2001, the Taliban regime in Afghanistan began to dynamite the 6th-century statues of Buddha in Bamian. Washington Post, "The president didn’t threaten just Iran’s culture sites. He threatened culture.," 6 Jan. 2020 Most of these outcrops were dynamited long ago, picking up during the building boom after the A train came to Inwood. Amy Sohn, New York Times, "How an Ice Age Boulder Became a $3 Million Real Estate Prospect," 20 Sep. 2019 The Browns don’t need to dynamite the roster of last year’s 6-10 underachievers. Terry Pluto, cleveland, "Approaching Cleveland Browns GM Andrew Berry with an open mind," 5 Feb. 2020 An investigative report released by the Alabama Historical Commission quoted historian John Sledge as saying one of the Meahers told him family members twice dynamited the wreck in the 1950s to retrieve valuable copper off the hull. Washington Post, "America’s last slave ship could offer a case for reparations," 5 Oct. 2019 The site was previously a parking lot for Henry Ford employees, and before that, was the old 12-story Howard Johnson's New Center Motor Lodge, which the hospital system dynamited in 1997 after having used it as office space and a dormitory. Jc Reindl, Detroit Free Press, "Massive housing project opens in Detroit's New Center: What it looks like," 5 Dec. 2019 An investigative report released by the Alabama Historical Commission quoted historian John Sledge as saying one of the Meahers told him family members twice dynamited the wreck in the 1950s to retrieve valuable copper off the hull. Washington Post, "America’s last slave ship could offer a case for reparations," 5 Oct. 2019 In January 1945, the Germans hurriedly began dynamiting Auschwitz and emptying the camp as the Russians approached. New York Times, "An Improbable Relic of Auschwitz: a Shofar That Defied the Nazis," 21 Sep. 2019 Their activities ranged from legal strikes, boycotts and lawsuits, to night-riding, bank robberies, barn-burning and dynamiting farm equipment. Trevor Paulhus, Smithsonian, "When the Socialist Revolution Came to Oklahoma—and Was Crushed," 19 Sep. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective The actresses playing the students themselves are dynamite comedians, especially Crabbe and Akibu, in supposedly subordinate roles; their reactions to Johnson’s Paulina, and to each other, are a production unto itself. Peter Marks, Washington Post, "Mean girls are at home in Ghana, too," 24 Sep. 2019 Out Friday, the dynamic and dynamite Highwomen album contains a dozen songs that span classic country and contemporary Americana. Sarah Rodman, EW.com, "From Dolly Parton's blessing to Tonight Show giggles: Get to know the Highwomen," 6 Sep. 2019 The scene, which jolts and spellbinds with the affecting draw of a Last Poets cipher, is just one of several fluorescent currents from HBO’s dynamic and dynamite six-episode series A Black Lady Sketch Show, which debuts tonight on HBO. Wired, "A Black Lady Sketch Show," 2 Aug. 2019 Pickerington Central was dynamite both offensively and defensively. Adam Baum, Cincinnati.com, "Mason falls to top-ranked Pickerington Central in OHSAA state basketball semifinal," 16 Mar. 2018 The scene, which jolts and spellbinds with the affecting draw of a Last Poets cipher, is just one of several fluorescent currents from HBO’s dynamic and dynamite six-episode series A Black Lady Sketch Show, which debuts tonight on HBO. Wired, "A Black Lady Sketch Show," 2 Aug. 2019 Pickerington Central was dynamite both offensively and defensively. Adam Baum, Cincinnati.com, "Mason falls to top-ranked Pickerington Central in OHSAA state basketball semifinal," 16 Mar. 2018 Tiny Dynamite’s intense, disturbing, and absorbing new drama Perfect Blue, now through July 23 at Christ Church Neighborhood House in Old City, opens at the beginning of the Sixth Great Extinction. Tirdad Derakhshani, Philly.com, "Explosive ideas, real passion: Eco-drama 'Perfect Blue' is perfect theater," 17 July 2017 Could there really be dynamite dim sum without the DMV-style take-a-number system? Michael Russell | The Oregonian/oregonlive, OregonLive.com, "Portland's 10 most underrated brunches," 10 May 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'dynamite.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of dynamite

Noun

1867, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1881, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Adjective

1922, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for dynamite

Noun

Greek dýnamis "power, strength" + -ite entry 1 — more at dynamic entry 1

Note: Though the principal figure in the development of dynamite, Alfred nobel, was Swedish, the earliest patent for the substance (May, 1867) was filed in the United Kingdom, so the word was effectively first introduced in English rather than in Swedish or German.

Verb

derivative of dynamite entry 1

Adjective

from attributive use of dynamite entry 1

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Time Traveler for dynamite

Time Traveler

The first known use of dynamite was in 1867

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Statistics for dynamite

Last Updated

29 May 2020

Cite this Entry

“Dynamite.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/dynamite. Accessed 2 Jun. 2020.

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More Definitions for dynamite

dynamite

noun
How to pronounce dynamite (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of dynamite

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: a powerful explosive that is often used in the form of a stick
: someone or something that may cause arguments or trouble

dynamite

verb

English Language Learners Definition of dynamite (Entry 2 of 3)

: to blow up (something) using dynamite

dynamite

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of dynamite (Entry 3 of 3)

informal : exciting and very impressive or pleasing

dynamite

noun
dy·​na·​mite | \ ˈdī-nə-ˌmīt How to pronounce dynamite (audio) \

Kids Definition of dynamite

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: an explosive used in blasting

dynamite

verb
dynamited; dynamiting

Kids Definition of dynamite (Entry 2 of 2)

: to blow up with dynamite

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Comments on dynamite

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