double jeopardy

noun

1
: the putting of a person on trial for an offense for which he or she has previously been put on trial under a valid charge : two adjudications for one offense
2
: considerable danger or trouble from two sources

Examples of double jeopardy in a Sentence

constitutional protections against double jeopardy
Recent Examples on the Web Read's lawyers countered with a constitutional double jeopardy argument, claiming that the jury had effectively rendered a not guilty verdict on at least two charges. Michael Ruiz, Fox News, 8 July 2024 In January, Judge Hagerman denied the double jeopardy motion and scheduled the retrial, which began last week. Nicole Lopez, Fort Worth Star-Telegram, 30 May 2024 Defense attorneys argued that the state’s double jeopardy law prohibits defendants from being tried more than once on the same crime. Salvador Hernandez, Los Angeles Times, 22 June 2024 What else happened? At Friday’s hearing, defense attorney Daniel Aaronson argued that a retrial violates Melly’s double jeopardy as Bradley didn’t share Brady material related to the incident with a Miramar police detective during the first trial. Grethel Aguila, Miami Herald, 16 June 2024 See all Example Sentences for double jeopardy 

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'double jeopardy.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

First Known Use

1862, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of double jeopardy was in 1862

Dictionary Entries Near double jeopardy

Cite this Entry

“Double jeopardy.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/double%20jeopardy. Accessed 24 Jul. 2024.

Legal Definition

double jeopardy

noun
: the prosecution of a person for an offense for which he or she has already been prosecuted see also jeopardy compare merger sense 3

Note: The Fifth Amendment to the Constitution states that no person shall “be subject for the same offense to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb.” The double jeopardy clause bars second prosecutions after either acquittal or conviction, and prohibits multiple punishments for the same offense.

More from Merriam-Webster on double jeopardy

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