dissipate

verb
dis·​si·​pate | \ ˈdi-sə-ˌpāt How to pronounce dissipate (audio) \
dissipated; dissipating

Definition of dissipate

transitive verb

1a : to break up and drive off dissipate a crowd
b : to cause to spread thin or scatter and gradually vanish one's sympathy is eventually dissipated— Andrew Feinberg
c physics : to lose (heat, electricity, etc.) irrecoverably
2 : to spend or use up wastefully or foolishly dissipated the family fortune in reckless business ventures

intransitive verb

1 : to break up and scatter or vanish The clouds dissipated and the sun came out. The team's early momentum has dissipated.
2 : to be extravagant or dissolute in the pursuit of pleasure especially : to drink to excess his extended dissipating of the night before

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Other Words from dissipate

dissipater noun

Choose the Right Synonym for dissipate

scatter, disperse, dissipate, dispel mean to cause to separate or break up. scatter implies a force that drives parts or units irregularly in many directions. the bowling ball scattered the pins disperse implies a wider separation and a complete breaking up of a mass or group. police dispersed the crowd dissipate stresses complete disintegration or dissolution and final disappearance. the fog was dissipated by the morning sun dispel stresses a driving away or getting rid of as if by scattering. an authoritative statement that dispelled all doubt

Examples of dissipate in a Sentence

The morning sun dissipated the fog. The fog should dissipate soon.

Recent Examples on the Web

By evening, spending time listening to the Indigenous leaders who’d come from around the world to engage in true cultural exchange would dissipate my anger—their message and their hope for cultural appreciation was an authentic one. Angie Jaime, Teen Vogue, "The Aniwa Gathering Connected Me to My Indigenous Ancestors," 2 Aug. 2019 Sylvester Stallone's underdog tale about a struggling palooka given one shot at the heavyweight championship is a stirring sports movie with a level of charm and sweetness that dissipated in the rounds (and rounds) of sequels that followed. Brian Lowry, CNN, "Essential movies of the 1970s from 'Jaws' to 'Being There'," 25 July 2019 Presumably, however, if all workers were equally entitled to leave for any reason, and truly felt there’d be no consequences attached to asking for it, the resentment toward parents and their special treatment would dissipate. Lila Maclellan, Quartz at Work, "It isn’t just new parents who deserve paid leave," 25 July 2019 Smoke from the fires in Ventura has dissipated by then. Patrick May, The Mercury News, "Recent California earthquakes and other disasters have spawned a time-lapse treasure trove," 26 July 2019 How much energy would need to be dissipated (in some form)? Rhett Allain, WIRED, "How Long Would It Take to Bicycle to the Moon?," 18 July 2019 Federer's 65-match winning streak on grass dissipated, despite a sizzling differential of 89 winners and 52 unforced errors. Ravi Ubha, CNN, "Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal meet in historic Wimbledon rematch," 11 July 2019 The urgency to impose a preventative rate cut has now dissipated. Eshe Nelson, Quartz, "A strong US jobs report puts the markets, the Fed, and the data at odds," 5 July 2019 Any storms that develop should dissipate by sunset, so fireworks displays shouldn't be affected. Dallas News, "NBC 5 Forecast: Isolated storm possible; Most will stay dry," 4 July 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'dissipate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of dissipate

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for dissipate

Latin dissipatus, past participle of dissipare, dissupare, from dis- + supare to throw

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Statistics for dissipate

Last Updated

20 Aug 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for dissipate

The first known use of dissipate was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for dissipate

dissipate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of dissipate

formal
: to cause (something) to spread out and disappear
: to separate into parts and disappear or go away
: to use all or a lot of (something, such as money or time) in a foolish way

dissipate

verb
dis·​si·​pate | \ ˈdi-sə-ˌpāt How to pronounce dissipate (audio) \
dissipated; dissipating

Kids Definition of dissipate

1 : to cause to break up and disappear: disperse The wind dissipated the clouds.
2 : to scatter or waste foolishly : squander He dissipated his saved allowance.

dissipate

transitive verb
dis·​si·​pate | \ ˈdi-sə-ˌpāt How to pronounce dissipate (audio) \
dissipated; dissipating

Legal Definition of dissipate

: to use (marital assets) for one's own benefit and to the exclusion of one's spouse for a purpose unrelated to the marriage at a time when the marriage is undergoing an irretrievable breakdown

Other Words from dissipate

dissipation \ ˌdi-​sə-​ˈpā-​shən How to pronounce dissipation (audio) \ noun

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Comments on dissipate

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