depth

noun
\ ˈdepth \
plural depths\ ˈdepths , ˈdep(t)s \

Definition of depth

1a(1) : a deep place in a body of water fish living at great depths
(2) : a part that is far from the outside or surface the depths of the woods
b(1) : a profound or intense state (as of thought or feeling) the depths of sorrow also : a reprehensibly low condition hadn't realized that standards had fallen to such depths
(2) : the middle of a time (such as a season) the depths of winter
(3) : the worst part the depths of the depression

2 mathematics

a : the perpendicular (see perpendicular entry 1 sense 1b) measurement downward from a surface the depth of a swimming pool
b : the direct linear measurement from front to back the depth of a bookshelf
3 : the quality of being deep the depth of the pass
4 : the degree of intensity depth of a color also : the quality of being profound (as in insight) or full (as of knowledge) the depth of her experience
5 : the quality or state of being complete or thorough a study will be made in depth
6 US, sports : the quality of having many good players a team that lacks depth in the outfield
beyond one's depth or out of one's depth
: beyond the limits of one's capabilities an actor who is out of his depth in serious drama

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Other Words from depth

depthless \ ˈdepth-​ləs \ adjective

Synonyms for depth

Synonyms

deepness, drop

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Examples of depth in a Sentence

These fish typically live at depths of 500 feet or more. Students will test the temperature of the water at different depths. The boat sank to a depth of several hundred feet. measuring the depth of the water the depth of a hole The pool has a depth of 12 feet. I began working at the factory during the depth of the Depression.
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Recent Examples on the Web

The bot’s eyes have six layers of projections to create an impression of depth, and its exterior (covered by a furry onesie that can be removed for washing) is touch sensitive. James Vincent, The Verge, "Japan’s latest home robot isn’t useful — it’s designed to be loved," 20 Dec. 2018 This play with light is what gives the facade its sense of depth. Liz Stinson, Curbed, "This red brick facade looks like a rippling piece of fabric," 19 Oct. 2018 While the overall depth is lacking, the Marauders return several starters on offense and defense. Kyle Neddenriep, Indianapolis Star, "Former Ben Davis coach Mike Kirschner rejuvenated in new stop at Mt. Vernon," 3 July 2018 The High Line is essentially a roof garden, 30 feet above the streets; the average depth of the soil is 18 inches. Pam Peirce, SFChronicle.com, "Manhattan’s High Line park offers lessons for SF greenbelts," 15 June 2018 Berry says a team’s depth could be so thin for late-season games and bowls that no more than 50 scholarship players of the 80-plus are available. Ross Dellenger, SI.com, "The NCAA's Redshirt Rule Change Is a Major Win for Both Coaches and Players," 13 June 2018 The depth of new material—on a road already well-trodden—and its analysis is commendable. Helen Fry, WSJ, "‘Enemies Within’ Review: Traitors to Their Class," 13 Dec. 2018 The depth of color reflects the maturity of the fruit at the time of harvest, with green and yellow occurring at the beginning of the ripening cycle and purple and black happening at the end. Caroline Picard, Good Housekeeping, "It Turns Out Olives Are Actually Fruits and Not Vegetables," 11 Dec. 2018 How can a paint and wallcoverings brand better showcase the depth of a color or the luminosity of a finish? Asad Syrkett, Curbed, "Can Farrow & Ball’s new LA showroom change what people think of paint stores?," 30 Nov. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'depth.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of depth

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a(1)

History and Etymology for depth

Middle English, from dep deep

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Statistics for depth

Last Updated

4 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for depth

The first known use of depth was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for depth

depth

noun
\ ˈdepth \

Kids Definition of depth

1 : measurement from top to bottom or from front to back a cupboard's depth
2 : a place far below a surface or far inside something (as a sea or a forest) Some unusual fish live at great depths.
3 : the middle of time the depth of winter
4 : intensity sense 2 a depth of color No one can imagine the … depth of our emotion …— E. B. White, The Trumpet of the Swan
5 : abundance, completeness The speaker displayed a depth of knowledge.

depth

noun
\ ˈdepth \
plural depths\ ˈdepth , ˈdep(t)s \

Medical Definition of depth

1 : the distance between upper and lower or between dorsal and ventral points of a body
2 : the quality of a state of consciousness, a bodily state, or a physiological function of being intense or complete the depth of anesthesia the depth of respiration

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More from Merriam-Webster on depth

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for depth

Spanish Central: Translation of depth

Nglish: Translation of depth for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of depth for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about depth

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