depress

verb
de·​press | \ di-ˈpres How to pronounce depress (audio) , dē-\
depressed; depressing; depresses

Definition of depress

transitive verb

1 obsolete : repress, subjugate
2a : to press down depress a typewriter key
b : to cause to sink to a lower position
3 : to lessen the activity or strength of drugs that may depress the appetite
4 : sadden, discourage don't let the news depress you
5 : to decrease the market value or marketability of

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Other Words from depress

depressible \ di-​ˈpre-​sə-​bəl How to pronounce depressible (audio) , dē-​ \ adjective

Examples of depress in a Sentence

The news seemed to depress him a little. I don't mean to depress you, but there's no way we can win. We were all depressed by the loss. You shouldn't let this kind of problem depress you. These changes could depress the economy. Market conditions are likely to depress earnings in the next quarter. depressing the price of a stock Slowly depress the car's brake pedal. Depress the “shift” key on your keyboard. The doctor will depress your tongue and look at your throat.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Trump has argued that the Fed, by keeping its benchmark rate in a range of 2.25% to 2.5%, is slowing economic growth and depressing the stock market. Washington Post, "Trump says he will tap economists for 2 key Fed vacancies," 2 July 2019 In response, the WGA sent a cease-and-desist letter to the Assn. of Talent Agents on Friday, accusing agencies of collusion and anti-competitive behavior that has depressed writer compensation. David Ng, latimes.com, "CAA becomes third agency to take Writers Guild to court," 1 July 2019 Reports on Michigan child welfare 'depressing,' says judge Also read: Audit blasts Michigan's Child Protective Services for failing kids The child-welfare system has been under court oversight for more than a decade. Ed White, Detroit Free Press, "Michigan to pull plug on child-welfare computer system after 5 years of problems," 27 June 2019 But high rates also make borrowing more expensive for Turkish businesses and consumers, depressing sales of cars, discouraging new ventures and constraining economic activity in general. Peter S. Goodman, New York Times, "For Erdogan, the Bill for Turkey’s Debt-Fueled Growth Comes Due," 24 June 2019 What’s depressing is that this paper towel EULA isn’t even new. James Vincent, The Verge, "A paper towel dispenser with an end-user license agreement is a special kind of hell," 20 June 2019 With crude prices again depressed from rising U.S. supplies and weakening global demand from the U.S.-China trade war and other concerns, OPEC and Russia appeared on track to agree to an extension of the cuts. Jordan Blum, Houston Chronicle, "Rystad: Uncertain OPEC should keep current cuts flat," 18 June 2019 Everything about his inquiry enrages and depresses me. Belinda Luscombe, Marie Claire, "Your Partner's Annoying Habits Are Pushing You to the Edge—Here's How Not to Break Up," 21 May 2019 According to mountains of thinkpieces and concerned researchers, our screens are rendering us the very opposite of zen—increasing the risk of ADHD in children, making them more violent, and leaving us all distracted, twitchy, and depressed. Cathleen O'grady, Ars Technica, "What do we actually know about the risks of screen time and digital media?," 17 Oct. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'depress.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of depress

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for depress

Middle English, from Middle French depresser, from Latin depressus, past participle of deprimere to press down, from de- + premere to press — more at press

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Statistics for depress

Last Updated

6 Jul 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for depress

The first known use of depress was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for depress

depress

verb

English Language Learners Definition of depress

: to make (someone) feel sad : to make (someone) depressed
: to decrease the activity or strength of (something)
formal : to press (something) down

depress

verb
de·​press | \ di-ˈpres How to pronounce depress (audio) \
depressed; depressing

Kids Definition of depress

1 : to press down Depress the “enter” key.
2 : to make sad or discouraged Don't let the news depress you.
3 : to lessen the activity or strength of Bad weather had depressed sales.

depress

transitive verb
de·​press | \ di-ˈpres How to pronounce depress (audio) \

Medical Definition of depress

1 : to diminish the activity, strength, or yield of able to depress irritability of the heart muscle by the use of such a drug as procaine
2 : to lower in spirit or mood

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More from Merriam-Webster on depress

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with depress

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for depress

Spanish Central: Translation of depress

Nglish: Translation of depress for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of depress for Arabic Speakers

Comments on depress

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