deportable

adjective
de·​port·​able | \ di-ˈpȯr-tə-bəl How to pronounce deportable (audio) , dē- \

Definition of deportable

1 : punishable by deportation deportable offenses
2 : subject to deportation deportable aliens

Examples of deportable in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web While Ton obtained legal permanent residency in 1981, his conviction makes him deportable under a 1996 immigration enforcement law that in part broadened the types of offenses that subjected legal immigrants to repatriation. NBC News, "Advocates rally around former Cambodian refugee who faces deportation," 1 Nov. 2019 The cruelty on display is absurd, as when a prison official brags about the boost in federal funding for detention centers and the growing list of deportable offenses being a boon for business. Sophie Gilbert, The Atlantic, "The Prescience of Orange Is the New Black," 25 July 2019 After all, being in the country without proper authorization would remain a civil--and therefore a deportable--offense. Todd J. Gillman, Dallas News, "Julian Castro would repeal illegal entry as a crime. Is that an 'open borders' policy?," 6 July 2019 Congress expanded the number of deportable offenses, incentivized the incarceration of immigrants and increased coordination between federal law enforcement and immigration forces. Jazmine Ulloa, latimes.com, "Painful scenes of child separations force a rare retreat from the White House," 20 June 2018 Certain kinds of assault convictions have led to removals, and new immigration policies under President Donald Trump have expanded the scope of deportable crimes. Michael Mccann, SI.com, "Conor McGregor Faces 12 Criminal Charges Following UFC 223 Media Day Altercation," 6 Apr. 2018 When deportable immigrants are arrested, some go into mandatory detention but some must be released. Tal Kopan, CNN, "Trump presses for options to end 'catch and release' in immigration policy," 6 Apr. 2018 The cruelty on display is absurd, as when a prison official brags about the boost in federal funding for detention centers and the growing list of deportable offenses being a boon for business. Sophie Gilbert, The Atlantic, "The Prescience of Orange Is the New Black," 25 July 2019 After all, being in the country without proper authorization would remain a civil--and therefore a deportable--offense. Todd J. Gillman, Dallas News, "Julian Castro would repeal illegal entry as a crime. Is that an 'open borders' policy?," 6 July 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'deportable.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of deportable

1891, in the meaning defined at sense 1

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The first known use of deportable was in 1891

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Last Updated

26 Jan 2020

Cite this Entry

“Deportable.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/deportable. Accessed 26 Feb. 2020.

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