deportable

adjective

de·​port·​able di-ˈpȯr-tə-bəl How to pronounce deportable (audio)
dē-
1
: punishable by deportation
deportable offenses
2
: subject to deportation
deportable aliens

Examples of deportable in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Many immigrants who could be deportable have U.S. citizen spouses or children, raising the specter of large-scale family separations since the government does not have the legal authority to deport American citizens. Camilo Montoya-Galvez, CBS News, 2 Nov. 2023 The American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California says California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation staff routinely assume people in their custody are deportable immigrants and refer them to Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Ryan Fonseca, Los Angeles Times, 30 Aug. 2023 The law also authorized warrantless arrest of anyone suspected of being deportable. Todd J. Gillman, Dallas News, 17 Aug. 2023 Amid progressive criticism of large-scale deportations, the Obama administration issued several memos directing ICE agents to focus on arresting certain classes of deportable immigrants, including recent border-crossers and those found to threaten public safety or national security. CBS News, 29 Nov. 2022 The Biden administration is preparing new rules to make nearly all migrants who illegally cross the border into the U.S. rapidly deportable to Mexico or their home countries and open new migrant-processing centers to create some legal pathways for asylum seekers. Michelle Hackman, wsj.com, 27 Apr. 2023 California has enacted various laws since 2013 that have chipped away at the power of the federal government to mandate local cooperation in handing over those who ICE deems deportable. San Francisco Chronicle, 9 Aug. 2021 The new charge carries a possible six-year prison sentence and still qualifies as a deportable crime if jurors opt to convict him of negligent discharge as opposed to the more serious assault count. Nancy Dillon, Rolling Stone, 6 Dec. 2022 Though a federal conviction for simple marijuana possession is a deportable offense, the pardon this week from President Joe Biden is not likely to help many immigrants with their court cases. San Diego Union-Tribune, 7 Oct. 2022 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'deportable.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

First Known Use

1891, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of deportable was in 1891

Dictionary Entries Near deportable

Cite this Entry

“Deportable.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/deportable. Accessed 3 Mar. 2024.

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