democratic

adjective
dem·​o·​crat·​ic | \ ˌde-mə-ˈkra-tik \

Definition of democratic

1 : of, relating to, or favoring democracy (see democracy sense 1) democratic elections a democratic government
2 often capitalized : of or relating to one of the two major political parties in the U.S. evolving in the early 19th century from the anti-federalists and the Democratic-Republican party and associated in modern times with policies of broad social reform and internationalism the Democratic candidate for governor
3 : relating to, appealing to, or available to the broad masses of the people democratic art democratic education
4 : favoring social equality : not snobbish disagrees with her very democratic husband

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Other Words from democratic

democratically \ -​ti-​k(ə-​)lē \ adverb

Synonyms & Antonyms for democratic

Synonyms

popular, republican, self-governing, self-ruling

Antonyms

nondemocratic, undemocratic

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Examples of democratic in a Sentence

Democratic elections were held there today for the first time. the country's new democratic constitution Debates are an important part of the democratic process. The Democratic candidate for governor won the debate. Most of these policies appeal to Democratic voters. an interview with a leader of the Democratic Party The organization works to promote democratic reforms around the world.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Unlike our senators who ignored their moral and democratic duties to heed our calls to believe survivors, the Department of Education is obligated to listen to our critique of its rule through the notice-and-comment process. Jess Davidson, Glamour, "Why Does the Department of Education Want to Put Sexual Assault Survivors on Trial?," 28 Nov. 2018 Brazil’s voter reform, though, seems to have been reasonably successful at making for more democratic and competitive elections. Kelsey Piper, Vox, "Study: election reforms in Brazil might have saved children’s lives. Here’s how.," 3 Dec. 2018 One faction of the magazine, led by Hertzberg, was robustly social democratic and distrustful of military adventurism. Jeet Heer, The New Republic, "Charles Krauthammer was a crucial New Republic voice for nearly a quarter century. RIP.," 22 June 2018 In that light, the new definition is more democratic — one that’s free to be used throughout all the world and not kept locked up in a case in France. Brian Resnick, Vox, "The world is about to redefine the kilogram," 15 Nov. 2018 Despite being undisputed royalty among patrons of the arts, Dominique and John de Menil were resolutely democratic in their approach to sharing their collected treasures with the public. Julie V. Iovine, WSJ, "A Buoyant Building for Looking and Learning," 12 Nov. 2018 Duda and government officials insist that their changes, which give the ruling party vast new powers over the courts, are democratic, making judges more accountable. Fox News, "Polish leader slammed for saying EU has little relevance," 12 Sep. 2018 In the best-case scenario, proponents say, coin offerings are far more democratic than what came before. New York Times, "Despite Caution Over Cryptocurrency, Investors Are Bullish," 27 June 2018 Mr López Obrador, by contrast, will govern a country that has been democratic only since 2000, and where corruption is widespread and growing worse. The Economist, "AMLO, Mexico’s answer to Donald Trump," 23 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'democratic.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of democratic

1602, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for democratic

borrowed from Middle French & Medieval Latin; Middle French democratique, borrowed from Medieval Latin dēmocraticus, borrowed from Greek dēmokratikós, from dēmokratía democracy + -ikos -ic entry 1

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Last Updated

19 Jan 2019

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Time Traveler for democratic

The first known use of democratic was in 1602

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More Definitions for democratic

democratic

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of democratic

: based on a form of government in which the people choose leaders by voting : of or relating to democracy

Democratic : of or relating to one of the two major political parties in the U.S.

: relating to the idea that all people should be treated equally

democratic

adjective
dem·​o·​crat·​ic | \ ˌde-mə-ˈkra-tik \

Kids Definition of democratic

1 : relating to or favoring political democracy
2 : relating to a major political party in the United States that is associated with helping common people
3 : believing in or practicing the idea that people are socially equal

Other Words from democratic

democratically \ -​ti-​kə-​lē \ adverb a democratically elected government

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