demand

noun
de·​mand | \ di-ˈmand How to pronounce demand (audio) , -ˈmänd, dē- \

Definition of demand

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : an act of demanding or asking especially with authority a demand for obedience
b : something claimed as due or owed the demands of the workers' union
2 archaic : question
3a economics : willingness and ability to purchase a commodity or service the demand for quality day care
b : the quantity of a commodity or service wanted at a specified price and time supply and demand
4a : a seeking or state of being sought after in great demand as an entertainer
b : urgent need an increased demand for blood donations
5 : the requirement of work or of the expenditure of a resource equal to the demands of the office demands on one's time oxygen demand for waste oxidation
on demand
: upon presentation and request for payment also : when requested or needed video on demand

demand

verb
demanded; demanding; demands

Definition of demand (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to call for something in an authoritative way : to make a demand : ask

transitive verb

1 : to ask or call for with authority : claim as due or just demanded to see a lawyer
2 : to call for urgently, imperiously, or insistently demanded that the rioters disperse
3a : to ask authoritatively or earnestly to be informed of demand the reason for the dismissal
b : to require to come : summon
4 : to call for as useful or necessary etiquette demands a handwritten thank-you

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Other Words from demand

Verb

demandable \ di-​ˈman-​də-​bəl How to pronounce demand (audio) , -​ˈmän-​ , dē-​ \ adjective
demander noun

Choose the Right Synonym for demand

Verb

demand, claim, require, exact mean to ask or call for something as due or as necessary. demand implies peremptoriness and insistence and often the right to make requests that are to be regarded as commands. demanded payment of the debt claim implies a demand for the delivery or concession of something due as one's own or one's right. claimed the right to manage his own affairs require suggests the imperativeness that arises from inner necessity, compulsion of law or regulation, or the exigencies of the situation. the patient requires constant attention exact implies not only demanding but getting what one demands. exacts absolute loyalty

Examples of demand in a Sentence

Noun The committee is considering her demand that she be given more time to complete the study. The workers said they would not end the strike until their demands were met. The demand for low-income housing is increasing as the economy gets worse. We are seeing an increased demand for hospital beds. The company increased production to meet demand. Verb The customer demanded a refund. Parents have demanded that the teacher resign. The reporter demanded to see the documents. I demand to know what is going on here! “Come here at once!” he demanded. “Why won't you answer me?” she demanded. The situation demands immediate action.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun DataRobot’s software uses artificial intelligence to help companies sift through vast amounts of data and build useful models that can, for example, make predictions about customer behavior or forecast demand for products. BostonGlobe.com, 28 July 2021 The high demand for a dwindling number of mobile home lots has left some people with no choice but to abandon their homes. Jessica Boehm, The Arizona Republic, 27 July 2021 The Federal Reserve's easy money policies have also kept mortgage rates near historic lows, pushing up demand for housing. Paul Wiseman, Star Tribune, 27 July 2021 That's because there's an influx of people moving to those parts of the country from other states, squeezing the demand for new houses, and therefore, lumber. Caroline Delbert, Popular Mechanics, 27 July 2021 Reckitt posted record sales last year, boosted by demand for its products like Dettol soap and wipes that strained its ability to keep stores stocked. Nick Kostov, WSJ, 27 July 2021 Many shelters had to operate at limited capacity while demand for their services increased. Jillian B. Carr, The Conversation, 27 July 2021 Later, British occupying forces created more demand for coffee shops. Livia Gershon, Smithsonian Magazine, 27 July 2021 And given the big demand for housing in Dallas, Hall is concerned that the hot housing market may encourage landlords to evict tenants and raise rents — or sell the property. Dallas News, 26 July 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Unlike many Southern civil rights leaders, and despite her organization’s name, Ms. Richardson did not demand a nonviolent response. New York Times, 18 July 2021 Now in my 40s with two kids and little spare time outside of work, open-world games that demand dozens of hours to complete need to clear a high bar to get my attention. Washington Post, 16 July 2021 That’s because the budget resolution contains language that would let Democrats move the huge spending bill through the Senate with just a simple majority, not the 60 votes Republicans could demand by using a bill-killing filibuster. Lisa Mascaro And Kevin Freking, chicagotribune.com, 14 July 2021 That does not demand respect from opponents or pollsters. Wally Hall, Arkansas Online, 13 July 2021 In May, Hong Kong police reportedly wrote to Israeli website manager Wix to demand the company remove a pro–Hong Kong democracy website from its servers, claiming that hosting the site violated the NSL. Eamon Barrett, Fortune, 30 June 2021 Following the 2020 murder of George Floyd by Minneapolis police, citizens all over the globe took to the streets to demand racial justice, not just from law enforcement and polilcymakers, but from institutions and industries. Quartz Staff, Quartz, 17 June 2021 That issue probably won't demand immediate attention, but a new arena campaign almost feels inevitable with ownership change. Star Tribune, 29 May 2021 Why didn’t Davis demand the ball more in the first place? Mark Medina, USA TODAY, 24 May 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'demand.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of demand

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

History and Etymology for demand

Noun

Middle English demaunde, demande "question, request, claim," borrowed from Anglo-French, noun derivative of demander, demaunder "to ask a question, claim as due" — more at demand entry 2

Verb

Middle English demaunden, demanden "to ask a question, ask, claim as due," borrowed from Anglo-French demander, demaunder, borrowed from Medieval Latin dēmandāre "to entrust, send, send word of, send instructions (to), make a claim on," going back to Latin, "to entrust, hand over (to), lay a duty on," from de- de- + mandāre "to hand over, deliver, order" — more at mandate entry 1

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Time Traveler for demand

Time Traveler

The first known use of demand was in the 13th century

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Dictionary Entries Near demand

de mal en pis

demand

demandant

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Statistics for demand

Last Updated

30 Jul 2021

Cite this Entry

“Demand.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/demand. Accessed 4 Aug. 2021.

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More Definitions for demand

demand

noun

English Language Learners Definition of demand

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a forceful statement in which you say that something must be done or given to you
: a strong need for something
: the ability and need or desire to buy goods and services

demand

verb

English Language Learners Definition of demand (Entry 2 of 2)

: to say in a forceful way that something must be done or given to you : to say that you have a right to (something)
: to say or ask (something) in a very forceful way
: to require (something)

demand

noun
de·​mand | \ di-ˈmand How to pronounce demand (audio) \

Kids Definition of demand

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a forceful expression of what is desired a demand for money
2 : something claimed as owed He presented a list of demands.
3 : an expressed desire to own or use something The demand for new cars is up.
4 : a seeking or state of being sought after Good teachers are in great demand.

demand

verb
demanded; demanding

Kids Definition of demand (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to claim as a right I demand an apology.
2 : to ask earnestly or in the manner of a command The sentry demanded the password.
3 : to call for : require The situation demands attention.
on demand
: when requested or needed Payment is due on demand.

demand

noun
de·​mand

Legal Definition of demand

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a formal request or call for something (as payment for a debt) especially based on a right or made with force a shareholder must first make a demand on the corporation's board of directors to act— R. C. Clark a written demand for payment
2 : something demanded any demands against the estate — see also claim
on demand
: upon presentation and request for payment

demand

transitive verb

Legal Definition of demand (Entry 2 of 2)

: to ask or call for with force, authority, or by legal right : claim as due on any issue triable of right by a jury, a party may demand a jury trialFederal Rules of Civil Procedure Rule 38(b)

Other Words from demand

demandable adjective

More from Merriam-Webster on demand

Nglish: Translation of demand for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of demand for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about demand

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