deafening

adjective
deaf·​en·​ing | \ ˈde-fə-niŋ How to pronounce deafening (audio) , ˈdef-niŋ \

Definition of deafening

1 : that deafens
2 : very loud : earsplitting fell with a deafening clap
3 : very noticeable their silence on the issue was deafening

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Other Words from deafening

deafeningly adverb

Examples of deafening in a Sentence

the deafening roar of the planes a boom box blasting deafening music
Recent Examples on the Web Tim Cook’s silence on all this, by the way, is pretty deafening. Andy Meek, BGR, 6 Aug. 2021 Finally, people are being encouraged to say Taylor's name loudly and often; in the streets and online, so that in the deafening wave of dissent crashing over the country, her story is not washed away. Aj Willingham, CNN, 5 June 2020 Full coverage of George Floyd's death and protests around the country Angelenos who remember the riots recall an almost deafening silence settling over the city as unrest wore on. NBC News, 4 June 2020 Once every decade or so, though, that cacophony turns deafening as millions of the winged insects emerge at once in dense throngs. Amy Mckeever, National Geographic, 3 June 2020 Polar bear warning signs went unheeded; the deafening hum of the vicious, biting flies seemed like more of an imminent threat. Hillary Richard, New York Times, 11 May 2020 So at least 40 cars instead piled into the parking lot of the neighboring CatholicLife Insurance building, where drivers proceeded to blare their horns in a deafening cacophony. Joshua Fechter, ExpressNews.com, 19 Apr. 2020 At the very least, the shift in conservative news suggests that the debate over the president’s competence will become yet another partisan one, obscuring Trump’s objective, on-the-record negligence in the usual deafening crossfire. Alex Shephard, The New Republic, 18 Mar. 2020 Yet that is easier said than done — in part because there’s a deafening amount of noise in American politics in 2020, and in part because Rx T. Rex is far from the only costumed mascot roaming the land. Samuel Ashworth, Washington Post, 24 Feb. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'deafening.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of deafening

1597, in the meaning defined at sense 1

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Time Traveler for deafening

Time Traveler

The first known use of deafening was in 1597

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Dictionary Entries Near deafening

deafen

deafening

deaf-mute

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Statistics for deafening

Last Updated

20 Aug 2021

Cite this Entry

“Deafening.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/deafening. Accessed 26 Sep. 2021.

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More Definitions for deafening

deafening

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of deafening

: extremely loud

More from Merriam-Webster on deafening

Nglish: Translation of deafening for Spanish Speakers

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