daisy

noun

dai·​sy ˈdā-zē How to pronounce daisy (audio)
plural daisies
1
: a composite plant (as of the genera Bellis or Chrysanthemum) having a flower head with well-developed ray flowers usually arranged in one or a few whorls: such as
a
: a low European herb (Bellis perennis) with white or pink ray flowers

called also English daisy

b
: a leafy-stemmed perennial herb (Leucanthemum vulgare synonym Chrysanthemum leucanthemum) with long white ray flowers and a yellow disk that was introduced into the U.S. from Europe

called also oxeye daisy

2
: the flower head of a daisy
3
: a first-rate person or thing
4
capitalized : a member of a program of the Girl Scouts for girls in kindergarten and first grade
daisylike adjective
or daisy-like
daisylike flowers

Did you know?

The daisy flower does not just bud, blossom, and die like most other flowers. Rather it performs a daily routine of “sleeping” at night by closing and “waking” in the morning by opening up again. Because of this unusual trait and the whorled appearance of the flower, the daisy was given the Old English name dægeseage, meaning literally “day’s eye.” The distinctive ray-like appearance of the daisy as it opens and closes with the sun reminds one of an eye that opens in the morning and closes at night.

Examples of daisy in a Sentence

while the old crooner is now well past his prime, Grandma still harkens back to the “daisy of a performance” he could give in his heyday
Recent Examples on the Web Stretch your creative muscles and arrange a beautiful bouquet of roses, daisies, and poppies that will last forever — no watering required. Isabel Garcia, Peoplemag, 10 May 2024 From mid-August to late September, bright orange Namaqualand daisies, vygies, lilies and geraniums blanket the earth, covering what is dry land for most of the year. Catherine Garcia, theweek, 15 Mar. 2024 Flowers included meadow grass, ox-eye daisies, iris, rose, clematis, mock orange, scabious, sweet pea, astrantia, martagon lily and love in a mist. Stephanie Petit, Peoplemag, 7 June 2024 There are marvelous set pieces, like a dream sequence in which a field of daisies becomes a troupe of tap dancers—they’re half Silly Symphony, half Busby Berkeley. Stephanie Zacharek, TIME, 31 May 2024 See all Example Sentences for daisy 

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'daisy.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Middle English dayeseye, from Old English dægesēage, from dæg day + ēage eye

First Known Use

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of daisy was before the 12th century

Dictionary Entries Near daisy

Cite this Entry

“Daisy.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/daisy. Accessed 24 Jun. 2024.

Kids Definition

daisy

noun
dai·​sy ˈdā-zē How to pronounce daisy (audio)
plural daisies
1
: any of numerous plants of the composite family having flower heads with well-developed ray flowers: as
a
: a low-growing European herb with white or pink ray flowers
b
: a tall leafy-stemmed wildflower introduced into America from Europe and having a flower head with a yellow disk in the center surrounded by long white ray flowers
2
: the flower head of a daisy
3
capitalized : a member of the Girl Scouts of the United States of America program for girls in kindergarten and first grade
Etymology

Old English dægesēage "daisy," literally, "day's eye," from dæg "day" and ēage "eye"

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