corpus callosum

noun

corpus cal·​lo·​sum -ka-ˈlō-səm How to pronounce corpus callosum (audio)
-kə-
plural corpora callosa -ka-ˈlō-sə How to pronounce corpus callosum (audio)
-kə-
: the great band of commissural fibers uniting the cerebral hemispheres of higher mammals including humans see brain illustration

Examples of corpus callosum in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web This reduction was evident in a region called corpus callosum, which connects the right and left brain hemispheres. Ignacio Amigo, Discover Magazine, 4 Nov. 2022 On the other hand, Maguire has long doubted that mutations in such important genes, used in nearly all cells, could cause defects only in the corpus callosum, and only in speech. Amber Dance Knowable Magazine, Smithsonian Magazine, 4 Sep. 2020 The corpus callosum is a part of the brain that connects the two hemispheres—the right side of the brain communicates with the left side of the body and the left side of the brain communicates with the right side of the body through the corpus callosum. Milo F. Bryant, Men's Health, 29 June 2022 Called the corpus callosum, this highway is what enables the two halves of the brain to communicate with each other. Kate Golembiewski, Discover Magazine, 11 Jan. 2022 In the early- to mid-20th century, some physicians attempted to control seizures in their severely epileptic patients by surgically severing the corpus callosum — and thus disrupting the electric impulses traveling from one hemisphere to the other. Kate Golembiewski, Discover Magazine, 11 Jan. 2022 When analyzing the images, neurologists saw key changes in neural connections between several motor areas in the brain and an altered corpus callosum due to fluid shifts in the brain, Space.com reports. Elizabeth Gamillo, Smithsonian Magazine, 24 Feb. 2022 Whatever the cause, imaging studies show that the brains of kids with DCD are markedly different from those of typically developing children, with evidence of alterations in motor and sensory regions and the corpus callosum, the thinking side of the brain that helps plan and execute motor tasks. Washington Post, 29 July 2021 There was no evidence for between-group differences in any measures of gross anatomy or in specific brain regions including the amygdala, hippocampus, most segments of the corpus callosum, and the cerebellum, which have been implicated in previous anatomical studies of ASD. Neuroskeptic, Discover Magazine, 25 Oct. 2014 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'corpus callosum.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

borrowed from New Latin, literally, "tough body"

First Known Use

1677, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of corpus callosum was in 1677

Dictionary Entries Near corpus callosum

Cite this Entry

“Corpus callosum.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/corpus%20callosum. Accessed 4 Mar. 2024.

Medical Definition

corpus callosum

noun
corpus cal·​lo·​sum
-ka-ˈlō-səm, -kə-
plural corpora callosa -sə How to pronounce corpus callosum (audio)
: the great band of commissural fibers uniting the cerebral hemispheres

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