cool

adjective
\ ˈkül How to pronounce cool (audio) \

Definition of cool

 (Entry 1 of 4)

1 : moderately cold : lacking in warmth The plant grows best in cool climates.
2a : marked by steady dispassionate calmness and self-control a cool and calculating businessperson
b : lacking ardor or friendliness a cool impersonal manner
c of jazz : marked by restrained emotion and the frequent use of counterpoint
d : free from tensions or violence We used to fight, but we're cool now.
3 used as an intensive a cool million dollars
4 : marked by deliberate effrontery or lack of due respect or discretion a cool reply
5 : facilitating or suggesting relief from heat a cool dress
6a of a color : producing an impression of being cool specifically : of a hue in the range violet through blue to green
b of a musical tone : relatively lacking in timbre or resonance (see resonance sense 2a)
7 informal
a : very good : excellent That was a really cool movie. also : all right Is getting together Friday night cool with you?
b : fashionable, hip … not happy with the new shoes … because they were not "cool."— Celestine Sibley

cool

verb
cooled; cooling; cools

Definition of cool (Entry 2 of 4)

intransitive verb

1 : to become cool : lose heat or warmth placed the pie in the window to cool sometimes used with off or down
2 : to lose ardor or passion His anger cooled.

transitive verb

1 : to make cool : impart a feeling of coolness to cooled the room with a fan often used with off or down A swim cooled us off a little.
2a : to moderate the heat, excitement, or force of : calm cooled her growing anger
b : to slow or lessen the growth or activity of usually used with off or down wants to cool off the economy without freezing itNewsweek
cool it
: to calm down : go easy The word went out to the young to cool it.— W. M. Young
cool one's heels
: to wait or be kept waiting for a long time especially from or as if from disdain or discourtesy

cool

noun

Definition of cool (Entry 3 of 4)

1 : a cool time, place, or situation the cool of the evening
2a : absence of excitement or emotional involvement : detachment … must surrender his fine cool and enter the closed crazy world of suicide …— Wilfrid Sheed
b : poise, composure The player lost his cool and began yelling at the referee.
3 : hipness

cool

adverb

Definition of cool (Entry 4 of 4)

: in a casual and nonchalant manner play it cool

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from cool

Adjective

coolish \ ˈkü-​lish How to pronounce cool (audio) \ adjective
coolly or less commonly cooly \ ˈkü(l)-​lē How to pronounce cool (audio) \ adverb
coolness \ ˈkül-​nəs How to pronounce cool (audio) \ noun

Choose the Right Synonym for cool

Adjective

cool, composed, collected, unruffled, imperturbable, nonchalant mean free from agitation or excitement. cool may imply calmness, deliberateness, or dispassionateness. kept a cool head composed implies freedom from agitation as a result of self-discipline or a sedate disposition. the composed pianist gave a flawless concert collected implies a concentration of mind that eliminates distractions especially in moments of crisis. the nurse stayed calm and collected unruffled suggests apparent serenity and poise in the face of setbacks or in the midst of excitement. harried but unruffled imperturbable implies coolness or assurance even under severe provocation. the speaker remained imperturbable despite the heckling nonchalant stresses an easy coolness of manner or casualness that suggests indifference or unconcern. a nonchalant driver

Examples of cool in a Sentence

Adjective The weather is cool today. The surface is cool to the touch. The plant grows best in cool climates. I'm feeling a little cool. We changed into some cooler clothes. She remained calm, cool, and collected. Verb The fan cools the engine. the cooling effect of the breeze Allow the cake to cool before slicing. the cooling of the ocean waters I took a break from the discussion to allow my anger to cool. His interest in her has cooled somewhat. Noun the judge's customary cool stood him in good stead during the sensational trial I envy you your cool. Adverb Here comes Mom. Act cool and she won't suspect a thing.
See More
Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Hands on his hips and looking as cool as the blue sky above Rolling Hills Estates, Culver City quarterback Zevi Eckhaus gave no hint standing in the middle of Peninsula High’s football field on Friday afternoon that history would be made. Eric Sondheimer Columnist, Los Angeles Times, "Column: Zevi Eckhaus becomes Culver City’s all-time passing leader in 49-0 win," 2 Apr. 2021 April and May are excellent months to get out fishing since lakes and ponds are still cool enough for cold-water loving rainbow trout. oregonlive, "Bill Monroe: The outdoors offers relief amid a challenging time," 2 Apr. 2021 Of course, the standings and strength of schedule positions are fluid, as other teams can get hot or cool off. Roy Parry, orlandosentinel.com, "Revamped Magic have fans torn between wanting to win or lose," 2 Apr. 2021 That's smart, and the giant screen surely looks cool. Ezra Dyer, Car and Driver, "We Take a Virtual Ride in the 2022 Mercedes-Benz EQS," 2 Apr. 2021 Summer is around the corner, and for many, that means trying to stay cool during long days of high temperatures. Matt Fleming, chicagotribune.com, "Which air conditioner should I buy?," 1 Apr. 2021 Canadian actress Jordan Alexander’s character, Julien Calloway, makes a private school varsity jacket and uniform look undeniably cool with a trendy collection of Balenciaga sneakers, croc boots, and a novelty JW Anderson handbag. Alexis Bennett, Vogue, "The New Gossip Girl Outfits Are XOXO Good," 1 Apr. 2021 Following the larger trend of subtle changes that feel brand-new (like vacation glow hair and reverse balayage), smoky brunette hair is a twist on classic brown that feels totally cool and fresh. Bella Cacciatore, Glamour, "Smoky Brunette Hair Is the Coolest Shade for Spring," 1 Apr. 2021 Let sauce cool for 20 minutes before tasting or using. Susan Selasky, Detroit Free Press, "5 favorite Easter brunch recipes perfect for any table," 1 Apr. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Transfer the coconut to a bowl to prevent it from over-browning on the sheet and let cool completely; leave the oven on. Tribune News Service, cleveland, "An Easter feast as tribute to the best of spring," 1 Apr. 2021 Transfer the pan to a wire rack and let cool for 1 hour. Washington Post, "This one-bowl cheesecake is light as a cloud and easy enough for a weeknight," 25 Mar. 2021 Pour the mixture into a jar and let cool to room temperature. Amanda Garrity, Good Housekeeping, "How to Make Homemade Natural Easter Egg Dyes With the Food in Your Kitchen," 17 Mar. 2021 Grill lemons until lightly charred and caramelized, 4 to 6 minutes; let cool. Whitney Otawka, Country Living, "Burnt Lemon Aïoli," 17 Mar. 2021 Remove from oven and let cool for about 10 minutes. Jessica Dupuy, Forbes, "What Grows Together Goes Together: The Wine And Food Of Italy’s Alto Adige Region," 11 Mar. 2021 Set aside and let cool to room temperature before glazing the chocolate torte. Jeremy Harlan, CNN, "These epic Girl Scout cookie-inspired recipes put a new spin on classic flavors," 10 Mar. 2021 Take out from the oven and let cool for at least 10 minutes before serving. Christian Reynoso, San Francisco Chronicle, "This cheesy, gooey gratin surprises with potatoes and golden beets," 5 Mar. 2021 Transfer oat mixture to large bowl; let cool 10 min. Ashley Rodriguez, Woman's Day, "Brown Butter Toasted Oat Bars," 4 Mar. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun That gives Chaiken plenty of time to mine Stabler's rich backstory as an ex-Marine from Queens with a wife, five children, and a tendency to lose his cool on the job. Lynette Rice, EW.com, "Christopher Meloni wants you to know he was shirtless when asked to reprise his 'SVU' role," 20 Mar. 2021 These editor-favorite sheets are made from 100% eucalyptus fiber, giving them a bit of a sheen and a cool-to-the-touch effect that’s simply irresistible for hot sleepers. Tanya Edwards, CNN Underscored, "Hot sleeper? Here are 22 products that can keep you cool," 15 Mar. 2021 Some blankets are made with cool-to-the-touch materials, while others are constructed with breathable materials that promote airflow around the body. Sian Babish, chicagotribune.com, "The best blanket for hot sleepers," 15 Mar. 2021 Surely the day will come when boring is the new cool. Laura Shapiro, The Atlantic, "Liberation in the Kitchen," 14 Mar. 2021 Temperatures made it to around 70 this afternoon, which is still a good deal above normal despite the significant cool-down compared with yesterday. Washington Post, "PM Update: Feeling more like March this weekend," 12 Mar. 2021 But there’s no doubt that Apple’s privacy labels, along with all the other cool iOS 14 features, are changing the market for the better. Kate O'flaherty, Forbes, "Apple Just Hit Out At Google And Facebook With Striking New Privacy Move," 12 Mar. 2021 The place buzzes with family fun while also exuding a gentle hipster cool, and the honor system coffee that's offered 24-7 is delicious and plentiful. Tracey Minkin, Southern Living, "Plan Your Best Vacation Ever," 9 Mar. 2021 Once zeroed, let your bore and suppressor cool completely, and allow all the gas to dissipate from inside the can. Tyler Freel, Outdoor Life, "How to Zero a Suppressed Rifle," 1 Mar. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Adverb But that doesn’t mean there aren’t some cool-looking campers out there. Bryan Hood, Robb Report, "This Land Rover Defender Camper Conversion Will Bring Rugged and Retro Style to the Campground," 26 Mar. 2021 On stage, SiR was cool personified, taking a few hits of some smoke handed to him by a fan, and singing effortlessly. Hank Shteamer, Rolling Stone, "Our Last Shows: ‘Rolling Stone’ Staffers Look Back at Their Final Concerts Before the World Went Quiet," 10 Mar. 2021 On top of being easy to adjust on the fly, the StreamCam is also the clear winner in the looks department (if having a cool-looking webcam matters to you, at least). Michael Andronico, CNN Underscored, "The best webcams of 2021," 4 Mar. 2021 With plants as the space’s backdrop—including cool-looking and unique species like Begonia maculata, Philodendron Birkin and Maranta Lemon Lime—customers invariably end up wanting to take one home. Metanoya Z. Webb, Essence, "Come To Their Oakland Shop For The Plants, But Stay For The Sanctuary and Peace," 4 Mar. 2021 Canon’s camera, however, ran into some early issues with heat reducing the overall usefulness of 8K capture—the body would require long cool-down times after short recording sessions to prevent damaging the electronics. Popular Science, "Sony’s pro-grade Alpha 1 is the first in a whole new category of cameras," 26 Jan. 2021 There was a clear winner: a cool-toned bronde hue which suited my fair skin perfectly. Jessica Harris, refinery29.com, "Forget Microblading — Hyperrealism Brows Are Taking Over & They’re So Natural," 6 Jan. 2021 Over a few minutes, a boat can be transferred from one canal to the next in a marvelous -- and cool-looking -- feat of engineering. Aj Willingham, CNN, "5 things to know for January 5: Senate runoffs, Covid, transition, Jacob Blake, Iran," 5 Jan. 2021 But conditions will quickly turn cool again on Thursday. Gary Robbins, San Diego Union-Tribune, "Weak Santa Ana winds expected Tuesday, elevating San Diego’s wildfire risk," 14 Dec. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cool.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of cool

Adjective

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Adverb

1968, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for cool

Adjective

Middle English col, going back to Old English cōl, going back to West Germanic *kōlu- (whence also Middle Dutch coele "moderately cold" and, from a variant *kōlja-, Old High German kuoli), lengthened-grade derivative from the base of *kalan- "to be cold" — more at cold entry 1

Verb

Middle English colen, going back to Old English cōlian, verbal derivative from Germanic *kōl- cool entry 1 (whence also Old Saxon colon "to become cool," Old High German kuolēn)

Noun

Middle English cole, derivative of col cool entry 1

Adverb

derivative of cool entry 1

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about cool

Time Traveler for cool

Time Traveler

The first known use of cool was before the 12th century

See more words from the same century

Statistics for cool

Last Updated

6 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Cool.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cool. Accessed 17 Apr. 2021.

Style: MLA
MLACheck Mark Icon ChicagoCheck Mark Icon APACheck Mark Icon Merriam-WebsterCheck Mark Icon

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for cool

cool

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of cool

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: somewhat cold : not warm or hot
: made of a light, thin material that helps you stay cool
: able to think and act in a calm way : not affected by strong feelings

cool

verb

English Language Learners Definition of cool (Entry 2 of 3)

: to make (someone or something) cool
: to become cool : to lose heat or warmth
: to become less strong or intense especially in emotion

cool

adverb

English Language Learners Definition of cool (Entry 3 of 3)

informal : in a calm manner : in a way that does not seem unusual or excited

cool

adjective
\ ˈkül How to pronounce cool (audio) \
cooler; coolest

Kids Definition of cool

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : somewhat cold : not warm a cool day a cool room
2 : not letting or keeping in heat cool clothes
3 : calm entry 3 sense 2 She is cool in a crisis.
4 : not interested or friendly He was cool to my idea.
5 : fashionable, stylish, or attractive in a way that is widely approved of
6 : very good excellent

Other Words from cool

coolly adverb
coolness noun

cool

verb
cooled; cooling

Kids Definition of cool (Entry 2 of 3)

: to make or become less warm

cool

noun

Kids Definition of cool (Entry 3 of 3)

1 : a time or place that is not warm the cool of the evening
2 : a calm state of mind Keep your cool.

Legal Definition of cool

: to lose passion : become calm sometimes used with off or down the time elapsing…is such that a reasonable man thus provoked would have cooled— W. R. LaFave and A. W. Scott, Jr.

Keep scrolling for more

More from Merriam-Webster on cool

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for cool

Nglish: Translation of cool for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of cool for Arabic Speakers

Comments on cool

What made you want to look up cool? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

The Exceptions Quiz III

  • one green toy robot amidst many red toy robots
  • Which of these words does not mean "nonsense"?
How Strong Is Your Vocabulary?

Test your vocabulary with our 10-question quiz!

TAKE THE QUIZ
 AlphaBear 2

Spell words. Make bears.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!