conserve

verb
con·​serve | \ kən-ˈsərv How to pronounce conserve (audio) \
conserved; conserving

Definition of conserve

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to keep in a safe or sound state He conserved his inheritance. especially : to avoid wasteful or destructive use of conserve natural resources conserve our wildlife
2 : to preserve with sugar
3 : to maintain (a quantity) constant during a process of chemical, physical, or evolutionary change conserved DNA sequences

conserve

noun
con·​serve | \ ˈkän-ˌsərv How to pronounce conserve (audio) \

Definition of conserve (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : sweetmeat especially : a candied fruit
2 : preserve specifically : one prepared from a mixture of fruits

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Other Words from conserve

Verb

conserver noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for conserve

Synonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Verb

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Examples of conserve in a Sentence

Verb With so little rain, everyone had to conserve water. We need to conserve our natural resources. Don't run around too much—you need to conserve your strength.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Set the water heater at no more than 120 degrees to prevent scalding, conserve energy and save money -- and also consider taking cold showers. Julia Jacobo, ABC News, 18 June 2021 Fearful that 2020 would be a replay of the economic collapse of 2008-09, many manufacturers cut back on output and capacity to conserve cash. Jason M. Thomas, WSJ, 26 May 2021 Neeleman’s planning to conserve cash by immediately selling his new A220s to a leasing company and then leasing them back. Jeremy Bogaisky, Forbes, 28 Apr. 2021 That's by far its best quarter since 2019, before the pandemic brought demand for air travel to a near halt and forced airlines to delay the delivery of new jets in order to conserve cash. Chris Isidore, CNN, 13 Apr. 2021 Sir David Attenborough has long focused mainly on the beauties and mysteries of nature rather than its destruction, conveying his own genuine wonderment with a dash of wry wit to entice viewers to love and conserve the planet. Andrea Marks, Rolling Stone, 7 June 2021 The concentration of manufacturers for certain drugs or active ingredients, in countries such as India or China, also left the United States vulnerable when countries considered limiting exports to conserve supplies for their own citizens. Editorial Board, Star Tribune, 4 June 2021 That means the refresh rate will vary depending on what’s shown on the screen to conserve battery life. Chris Smith, BGR, 31 May 2021 That's also despite several CEOs taking high-profile cuts to their salary during the year as an act of shared sacrifice and to conserve a bit of cash for the company. Arkansas Online, 29 May 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun These include measures to promote renewable energy development, conserve water, and manage natural and working lands more sustainably. Brandi Mckuin, The Conversation, 3 May 2021 Lebo helpfully educates readers on the differences between, for example, a jelly, a jam, a preserve, and a conserve. Molly Young, Vulture, 9 Apr. 2021 Boil water notices and conserve pleas are still in effect in multiple cities. Dallas News, 19 Feb. 2021 Visitors will learn about the diversity of California’s native flora and how its use in urban landscapes reduces pesticides, conserves water and transforms spaces into thriving habitats. La Cañada Valley Sun, 1 Oct. 2019 In the 21st century, progressive design conserves financial and natural resources and honors its physical and cultural context. Los Angeles Times, 30 Aug. 2019 This model is how our society values, restores, and conserves wildlife through noncommercial, legitimate hunting activities and scientific game management. Anchorage Daily News, 6 Aug. 2019 Mulch also suppresses weeds and conserves soil moisture. Washington Post, 24 July 2019 Doing so conserves resources (those not wasted on people who are not likely to respond or be in need of help). Austin Frakt, New York Times, 28 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'conserve.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of conserve

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for conserve

Verb

Middle English, from Middle French conserver, from Latin conservare, from com- + servare to keep, guard, observe; akin to Avestan haurvaiti he guards

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Learn More About conserve

Time Traveler for conserve

Time Traveler

The first known use of conserve was in the 14th century

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Statistics for conserve

Last Updated

22 Jun 2021

Cite this Entry

“Conserve.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/conserve. Accessed 25 Jun. 2021.

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More Definitions for conserve

conserve

noun

English Language Learners Definition of conserve

: a sweet food made by cooking pieces of fruit with sugar

conserve

verb
con·​serve | \ kən-ˈsərv How to pronounce conserve (audio) \
conserved; conserving

Kids Definition of conserve

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to prevent the waste of Close the window to conserve heat.
2 : to keep in a safe condition : save We must conserve our forests.

conserve

noun
con·​serve | \ ˈkän-ˌsərv How to pronounce conserve (audio) \

Kids Definition of conserve (Entry 2 of 2)

: a rich fruit preserve

conserve

noun
con·​serve | \ ˈkän-ˌsərv How to pronounce conserve (audio) \

Medical Definition of conserve

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: an obsolete medicinal preparation made by mixing undried vegetable drugs with sufficient powdered sugar to form a soft mass — compare confection

conserve

transitive verb
con·​serve | \ kən-ˈsərv How to pronounce conserve (audio) \
conserved; conserving

Medical Definition of conserve (Entry 2 of 2)

: to maintain (a quantity) constant during a process of chemical, physical, or evolutionary change a DNA sequence that has been conserved

More from Merriam-Webster on conserve

Nglish: Translation of conserve for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of conserve for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about conserve

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