conserve

1 of 2

verb

con·​serve kən-ˈsərv How to pronounce conserve (audio)
conserved; conserving

transitive verb

1
: to keep in a safe or sound state
He conserved his inheritance.
especially : to avoid wasteful or destructive use of
conserve natural resources
conserve our wildlife
2
: to preserve with sugar
3
: to maintain (a quantity) constant during a process of chemical, physical, or evolutionary change
conserved DNA sequences
conserver noun

conserve

2 of 2

noun

con·​serve ˈkän-ˌsərv How to pronounce conserve (audio)
1
: sweetmeat
especially : a candied fruit
2
: preserve
specifically : one prepared from a mixture of fruits

Examples of conserve in a Sentence

Verb With so little rain, everyone had to conserve water. We need to conserve our natural resources. Don't run around too much—you need to conserve your strength.
Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
Congress decided to make daylight saving time permanent for two years from 1973 to 1975, extending the hours of daily sunlight year-round to conserve energy during the oil embargo crisis. Victoria Moorwood, The Enquirer, 23 Feb. 2024 The hindbrain is an older region that has been evolutionarily conserved, or virtually unchanged throughout the process of evolution. Laura Baisas, Popular Science, 22 Feb. 2024 This allows the company to conserve resources without the immediate shock and morale impact of layoffs. Expert Panel®, Forbes, 21 Feb. 2024 The country is working to conserve 30% of its landscapes by 2030. Bill Frist, Fortune, 20 Feb. 2024 Yes | Motion Sensor: No | Compatibility: Google Assistant, Amazon Alexa, Samsung SmartThings, Wink, Cortana The Bottom Line Smart thermostats are the smart move for conserving energy and saving money on your heating and cooling costs. Barbara Bellesi Zito, Better Homes & Gardens, 16 Feb. 2024 The Huron Consulting Group will review the university's administrative structure. $10M in grants will help metro Phoenix communities conserve water. The Arizona Republic, 30 Jan. 2024 Gomberg said many Californians are doing their part to conserve, and the state should put a greater focus on agriculture in the Central Valley, where almonds, pistachios and other crops use vast quantities of water. Ian James, Los Angeles Times, 17 Jan. 2024 The Common Wild website points to conserving the outdoors as a vital part of preserving the $887 billion recreation economy. Nicole Blanchard, Idaho Statesman, 31 Jan. 2024
Noun
Assenza is a master of preserving and transforming fruit into delicious conserves and marmalades. Ben Mims, Los Angeles Times, 26 Mar. 2023 Her cranberry conserve? Amiel Stanek, Bon Appétit, 25 Oct. 2022 Its metabolism and body temperature drop sharply, letting the animal conserve energy. Elizabeth Preston, Discover Magazine, 3 Jan. 2014 Citizen scientists in the bay area are helping conserve birds and their habitats through the San Francisco Bird Bay Observatory. Kristin Butler, Discover Magazine, 15 Sep. 2015 The parks will bring farmers, processors, and retailers together using advanced climate technology to minimise waste, conserve water, and maximise crop yields, Reuters reported. Ananya Bhattacharya, Quartz, 15 July 2022 The limited-edition yogurt, which is mixed with a strawberry-champagne conserve, features a small, tiara-like design drawing, similar to illustrations of crowns on Heinz’s sauce labels. Katie Deighton, WSJ, 25 May 2022 To maximize the damage and conserve resources, DDoSers often increase the firepower of their attacks through amplification vectors. Dan Goodin, Ars Technica, 1 Mar. 2022 Exactly what is the scientific foundation for the company’s claims that dredging the lake will fix its ecology and conserve water, however, is anybody’s guess. Brian Maffly, The Salt Lake Tribune, 19 Jan. 2022 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'conserve.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Verb

Middle English conserven "to maintain in good condition, preserve, protect, keep," borrowed from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French conserver "to preserve" (also continental Middle French), borrowed from Latin conservāre "to save or keep from danger, preserve, keep unchanged," from con- con- + servāre "to watch over, guard, keep, observe (a law, custom), maintain in existence, preserve," probably derivative of an abstract noun *seru̯om or *seru̯ā "observation, guarding," formed from the Indo-European verbal base *ser- "keep watch on, guard" and a nominal suffix *-u̯o- — more at serve entry 1

Noun

Middle English, "medicinal preparation, sweetmeat," borrowed from Middle French, "preserved food product," noun derivative of conserver "to maintain, preserve, conserve entry 1"

First Known Use

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of conserve was in the 14th century

Dictionary Entries Near conserve

Cite this Entry

“Conserve.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/conserve. Accessed 27 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

conserve

1 of 2 verb
con·​serve kən-ˈsərv How to pronounce conserve (audio)
conserved; conserving
1
a
: to keep in a safe or sound state
b
: to avoid wasteful or destructive use of : use carefully
conserve natural resources
conserve energy
2
: to preserve with sugar
3
: to keep (a quantity) constant during a process of change (as chemical change)
conserver noun

conserve

2 of 2 noun
con·​serve ˈkän-ˌsərv How to pronounce conserve (audio)
1
: a candied fruit
2

Medical Definition

conserve

1 of 2 noun
con·​serve ˈkän-ˌsərv How to pronounce conserve (audio)
: an obsolete medicinal preparation made by mixing undried vegetable drugs with sufficient powdered sugar to form a soft mass compare confection

conserve

2 of 2 transitive verb
con·​serve kən-ˈsərv How to pronounce conserve (audio)
conserved; conserving
: to maintain (a quantity) constant during a process of chemical, physical, or evolutionary change
a DNA sequence that has been conserved

More from Merriam-Webster on conserve

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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