concierge

noun
con·​cierge | \ kōⁿ-ˈsyerzh , ˌkän-sē-ˈerzh\
plural concierges\ kōⁿ-​ˈsyerzh , -​ˈsyer-​zhəz ; ˌkän-​sē-​ˈer-​zhəz \

Definition of concierge

1 : a resident in an apartment building especially in France who serves as doorkeeper, landlord's representative, and janitor
2 : a usually multilingual hotel staff member who handles luggage and mail, makes reservations, and arranges tours broadly : a person employed (as by a business) to make arrangements or run errands

Examples of concierge in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web

Technology is really allowing people to be their own concierge or curator and people are looking for experiences more than ever these days. Elaine Glusac, New York Times, "From Ace Hotel, a New City and a New Brand," 25 June 2018 Then ask your hotel concierge to point you in the right direction. Ac Shilton, Outside Online, "Carissa Moore's Guide to Honolulu's Best Food," 23 May 2018 Now everyone’s favorite big-box store, Target, is jumping on board and launching its own beauty concierge to better serve its customers. Shannon Barbour, The Cut, "Target Just Made Shopping for Makeup Much Easier," 21 May 2018 Chinese e-commerce company Alibaba launched the Space Egg robot hotel porter late last year, and the Hilton in McLean, Va., employs a robot concierge. Takashi Mochizuki, WSJ, "Robot Hotel Loses Love for Robots," 14 Jan. 2019 Members arriving to start work are greeted by a concierge who offers fresh coffee, lemon water, and phone chargers. Prue Lewington, Harper's BAZAAR, "The Jane Club Is the Ultimate Work Space for Moms," 14 Dec. 2018 For a concierge, $5 should be a baseline starting point. Jennifer Lance, Glamour, "Are You Tipping Enough During Your Hotel Stay?," 12 Dec. 2018 The 8,000-square feet spread is part of Ritz Carlton Residences and features world-class amenities: concierge services, in-house dining, and a spa. Sara Rodrigues, House Beautiful, "This NYC Apartment Features Stunning Views Of Central Park For $39.5 Million," 30 Dec. 2018 The concept is similar to concierge medicine, which for years has allowed wealthy patients to pay fees for more personal, accessible care. Lisa Schencker, chicagotribune.com, "More doctors embrace membership fees, shunning health insurance," 22 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'concierge.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of concierge

circa 1697, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for concierge

French, from Old French, probably from Vulgar Latin *conservius, alteration of Latin conservus fellow slave, from com- + servus slave

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Last Updated

16 Feb 2019

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Time Traveler for concierge

The first known use of concierge was circa 1697

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More Definitions for concierge

concierge

noun

English Language Learners Definition of concierge

: a person in an apartment building especially in France who takes care of the building and checks the people who enter and leave
chiefly US : an employee at a hotel whose job is to provide help and information to the people staying at the hotel

More from Merriam-Webster on concierge

Britannica English: Translation of concierge for Arabic Speakers

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