cloak

noun
\ ˈklōk How to pronounce cloak (audio) \

Definition of cloak

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a loose outer garment
2 : something likened to an outer garment: such as
a : something that envelops or conceals a cloak of secrecy
b : a distinctive character or role hung up his academic cloak … to become a stay-at-home father— Charles Chamberlain

cloak

verb
cloaked; cloaking; cloaks

Definition of cloak (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to cover or hide with or as if with a cloak

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Synonyms & Antonyms for cloak

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Verb

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Choose the Right Synonym for cloak

Verb

disguise, cloak, mask mean to alter the dress or appearance of so as to conceal the identity or true nature. disguise implies a change in appearance or behavior that misleads by presenting a different apparent identity. disguised herself as a peasant cloak suggests a means of hiding a movement or an intention. cloaked their maneuvers in secrecy mask suggests some often obvious means of hiding or disguising something. smiling to mask his discontent

Examples of cloak in a Sentence

Noun Their plans were shrouded in a cloak of secrecy. the cloak of mystery that surrounds the royal family Verb the outlaw nation had cloaked its chemical weapons plant as a fertilizer factory cloaked their military maneuvers from the outside world
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun As a group of sorority sisters prepare to have fun at some seasonal parties, a mysterious person in a cloak begins to leave a bloody trail around campus. jsonline.com, "Christmas movie guide: Where and when you can find holiday shows, from Hallmark movies to 'It's a Wonderful Life'," 21 Nov. 2020 In the 1990s, a long crack was reported in Louis' cloak, and two toes were missing from a cherub at his feet. Sarah Ladd, The Courier-Journal, "Bipartisan resolution asks Louisville mayor to restore King Louis statue, return it downtown," 4 Nov. 2020 The answer is no, as The Boys' Black Noir (Nathan Mitchell) is still shrouded in a cloak of mystery, in more ways than one. Rachel Paige, refinery29.com, "What Exactly Is Black Noir’s Deal On The Boys?," 11 Sep. 2020 And — despite generating excitement by wearing a Māori cloak when meeting Queen Elizabth II in 2018 — she has been criticized for not addressing inequality among the Māori population. NBC News, "New Zealand's Jacinda Ardern wins big after world-leading Covid-19 response," 20 Oct. 2020 The pair move to Venice, Italy, for work, where a little figure in a red cloak, resembling the outfit their daughter wore on her final day, stalks them around the canals. David Sims, The Atlantic, "Horror Movies Are for Everyone," 19 Oct. 2020 While the pandemic prevented the traditional parade, there was plenty of fanfare in Battery Park City, where a red cloak was removed to reveal the bronze statue after the governor spoke. Zachary Small, New York Times, "Cuomo Unveils Statue of Mother Cabrini," 12 Oct. 2020 As pharmaceutical companies work to produce one as quickly as possible, the board’s anonymity has stirred concerns that the cloak of secrecy could, paradoxically, allow undue influence. al, "UAB disease expert leads secret panel evaluating coronavirus vaccine possibilities," 29 Sep. 2020 Data and safety monitoring boards work under a cloak of secrecy meant to prevent undue influence. NBC News, "Two officers shot in Louisville as protests grow, Trump refuses to commit to peaceful transfer of power," 24 Sep. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb In the president’s America, white supremacists don’t need to cloak themselves in robes and hoods. Otis R. Taylor Jr., SFChronicle.com, "Thanks to Trump, U.S. no longer in denial of racism," 2 Nov. 2020 Others might cloak their PCs in chocolate boxes or wrap them in sandwich paper and conceal them in the trunk of their Trabant or Skoda cars while entering the country. Andrada Fiscutean, Ars Technica, "How Indiana Jones, Rambo, and others ended up in 1980s Czechoslovak text-adventures," 23 Oct. 2020 This envelope can cloak the pathogen from antibodies deployed by the human immune system, enabling it to infect cells undetected. Marla Broadfoot, Scientific American, "Why Some People Are Still Getting Sick--but Not with COVID," 2 Oct. 2020 The leaves that cloak a ginkgo’s graceful branches in summer are unique. Beth Botts, chicagotribune.com, "An ode to the ginkgo, as its fleeting golden leaves arrive in the last show of summer," 27 Sep. 2020 Taken from the medieval crusades, the slogan’s misappropriation by today’s far right seeks to cloak violent ideology in religious justifications. Michael A. Vargas, The Conversation, "Sacred violence is not yet ancient history – beating it will take human action, not divine intervention," 25 Sep. 2020 The zealotry of these Victorian Turkish bath enthusiasts often reads like an investment in pleasure — the pleasures of proximity, thrilling contact, physical extremity — trying to cloak itself in the more serious clothing of medical necessity. Leslie Jamison, New York Times, "Is It Strange to Say I Miss the Bodies of Strangers?," 22 Sep. 2020 Other factors such as interactions between germanium protons and electrons might also cloak the signal, says theoretical physicist Maaneli Derakhshani of Rutgers University, New Brunswick. George Musser, Science | AAAS, "One of quantum physics’ greatest paradoxes may have lost its leading explanation," 7 Sep. 2020 Even if these new algorithms succeed, there may still be ways to cloak yourself to facial recognition software. Rachel Metz, CNN, "Think your mask makes you invisible to facial recognition? Not so fast, AI companies say," 12 Aug. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cloak.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cloak

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1509, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for cloak

Noun

Middle English cloke, from Anglo-French cloque bell, cloak, from Medieval Latin clocca bell; from its shape

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Time Traveler for cloak

Time Traveler

The first known use of cloak was in the 13th century

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Statistics for cloak

Last Updated

25 Nov 2020

Cite this Entry

“Cloak.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cloak. Accessed 1 Dec. 2020.

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More Definitions for cloak

cloak

noun
How to pronounce cloak (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of cloak

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a piece of clothing that is used as a coat, that has no sleeves, and that is worn over the shoulders and attached at the neck
: a thing that hides or covers someone or something

cloak

verb

English Language Learners Definition of cloak (Entry 2 of 2)

literary
: to cover (someone or something)
: to hide or disguise (something)

cloak

noun
\ ˈklōk How to pronounce cloak (audio) \

Kids Definition of cloak

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a long loose outer garment
2 : something that hides or covers A cloak of secrecy surrounded the meeting.

cloak

verb
cloaked; cloaking

Kids Definition of cloak (Entry 2 of 2)

: to cover or hide completely Night cloaked the fields in darkness.

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Comments on cloak

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