cloak

noun
\ ˈklōk How to pronounce cloak (audio) \

Definition of cloak

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a loose outer garment
2 : something likened to an outer garment: such as
a : something that envelops or conceals a cloak of secrecy
b : a distinctive character or role hung up his academic cloak … to become a stay-at-home father— Charles Chamberlain

cloak

verb
cloaked; cloaking; cloaks

Definition of cloak (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to cover or hide with or as if with a cloak

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Synonyms & Antonyms for cloak

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Verb

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Choose the Right Synonym for cloak

Verb

disguise, cloak, mask mean to alter the dress or appearance of so as to conceal the identity or true nature. disguise implies a change in appearance or behavior that misleads by presenting a different apparent identity. disguised herself as a peasant cloak suggests a means of hiding a movement or an intention. cloaked their maneuvers in secrecy mask suggests some often obvious means of hiding or disguising something. smiling to mask his discontent

Examples of cloak in a Sentence

Noun Their plans were shrouded in a cloak of secrecy. the cloak of mystery that surrounds the royal family Verb the outlaw nation had cloaked its chemical weapons plant as a fertilizer factory cloaked their military maneuvers from the outside world
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun In a 2012 interview with the Russian government daily Rossiyskaya Gazeta, Blake shared some details of his cloak-and-dagger adventures, including meetings with a Soviet liaison in East Berlin. Vladimir Isachenkov, USA TODAY, "George Blake, British double agent, dies in Russia at 98," 27 Dec. 2020 In a 2012 interview with the Russian government daily Rossiyskaya Gazeta, Blake shared some details of his cloak-and-dagger adventures, including meetings with a Soviet liaison in East Berlin. Vladimir Isachenkov, chicagotribune.com, "George Blake, double agent who passed Western secrets to Soviets and made daring escape east, dies in Russia," 26 Dec. 2020 Le Carré inhabited an England beyond my horizons, not just the cloak-and-dagger one, but the one that exists at Eton and at Oxford and in many parts of London, lands that remain foreign to most of us. Tom Mctague, The Atlantic, "John le Carré Knew England’s Secrets," 14 Dec. 2020 He was reported to have been diagnosed with prostate cancer around 2014 but those reports are shrouded behind a cloak of secrecy with the question of succession and its far-reaching domestic and global impact becoming increasingly important. Hollie Mckay, Fox News, "Is Iran's Supreme Leader preparing to designate his son as the next in line?," 8 Dec. 2020 In 2019 researchers led by a group at Stanford, including Elizabeth Burgener and Paul Bollyky, discovered that filamentous phages can form a protective cloak—layers of carbohydrates and proteins that help bacteria hide from antibiotics. David Pride, Scientific American, "Viruses Can Help Us as Well as Harm Us," 7 Dec. 2020 The basilica in Mexico City houses the original cloak on which it is believed the image of the Virgin Mary appeared before peasant Juan Diego in December 1531 on the hill where her shrine now stands. Laura Rodríguez Presa, chicagotribune.com, "Religious leaders in Chicago urge devotees of Our Lady of Guadalupe to avoid pilgrimages to Des Plaines as image will be removed from shrine," 3 Dec. 2020 Diego did as instructed, gathering the roses in his cloak and showing them to the bishop, who was awestruck at the miraculous sight of the Virgen de Guadalupe’s image on Diego’s clothing. Los Angeles Times, "Coronavirus changes everything about Virgen de Guadalupe procession but participants’ devotion," 6 Dec. 2020 Until that point, cooks had masked the main ingredients of a dish under a cloak of powerful spices. Aaron Timms, The New Republic, "The Tangled Legacy of James Beard," 4 Dec. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Those using and abusing anonymous shells to cloak themselves in anonymity run the gamut. Morris Pearl, Fortune, "Congress just passed the most important anti-corruption reform in decades, but hardly anyone knows about it," 26 Dec. 2020 Fagan stands in a city park where branches and trunks of 100- to 250-year-old oaks still cloak the ground in mid October. Dustin Renwick, Environment, "How one city plans to recover from losing most of its trees," 10 Dec. 2020 In the president’s America, white supremacists don’t need to cloak themselves in robes and hoods. Otis R. Taylor Jr., SFChronicle.com, "Thanks to Trump, U.S. no longer in denial of racism," 2 Nov. 2020 Others might cloak their PCs in chocolate boxes or wrap them in sandwich paper and conceal them in the trunk of their Trabant or Skoda cars while entering the country. Andrada Fiscutean, Ars Technica, "How Indiana Jones, Rambo, and others ended up in 1980s Czechoslovak text-adventures," 23 Oct. 2020 This envelope can cloak the pathogen from antibodies deployed by the human immune system, enabling it to infect cells undetected. Marla Broadfoot, Scientific American, "Why Some People Are Still Getting Sick--but Not with COVID," 2 Oct. 2020 The leaves that cloak a ginkgo’s graceful branches in summer are unique. Beth Botts, chicagotribune.com, "An ode to the ginkgo, as its fleeting golden leaves arrive in the last show of summer," 27 Sep. 2020 Taken from the medieval crusades, the slogan’s misappropriation by today’s far right seeks to cloak violent ideology in religious justifications. Michael A. Vargas, The Conversation, "Sacred violence is not yet ancient history – beating it will take human action, not divine intervention," 25 Sep. 2020 The zealotry of these Victorian Turkish bath enthusiasts often reads like an investment in pleasure — the pleasures of proximity, thrilling contact, physical extremity — trying to cloak itself in the more serious clothing of medical necessity. Leslie Jamison, New York Times, "Is It Strange to Say I Miss the Bodies of Strangers?," 22 Sep. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cloak.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cloak

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1509, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for cloak

Noun

Middle English cloke, from Anglo-French cloque bell, cloak, from Medieval Latin clocca bell; from its shape

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Time Traveler for cloak

Time Traveler

The first known use of cloak was in the 13th century

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Statistics for cloak

Last Updated

18 Jan 2021

Cite this Entry

“Cloak.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cloak. Accessed 19 Jan. 2021.

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More Definitions for cloak

cloak

noun
How to pronounce cloak (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of cloak

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a piece of clothing that is used as a coat, that has no sleeves, and that is worn over the shoulders and attached at the neck
: a thing that hides or covers someone or something

cloak

verb

English Language Learners Definition of cloak (Entry 2 of 2)

literary
: to cover (someone or something)
: to hide or disguise (something)

cloak

noun
\ ˈklōk How to pronounce cloak (audio) \

Kids Definition of cloak

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a long loose outer garment
2 : something that hides or covers A cloak of secrecy surrounded the meeting.

cloak

verb
cloaked; cloaking

Kids Definition of cloak (Entry 2 of 2)

: to cover or hide completely Night cloaked the fields in darkness.

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Comments on cloak

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