chronicle

noun
chron·​i·​cle | \ ˈkrä-ni-kəl How to pronounce chronicle (audio) \

Definition of chronicle

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a historical account of events arranged in order of time usually without analysis or interpretation a chronicle of the Civil War
2 : narrative sense 1 a chronicle of the struggle against drug traffickers

chronicle

verb
chronicled; chronicling\ ˈkrä-​ni-​k(ə-​)liŋ How to pronounce chronicle (audio) \

Definition of chronicle (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to present a record of in or as if in a chronicle chronicle Victorian society chronicle the doings of the rich and famous

Other Words from chronicle

Verb

chronicler \ ˈkrä-​ni-​k(ə-​)lər How to pronounce chronicle (audio) \ noun

Examples of chronicle in a Sentence

Noun a chronicle of the American Civil War a chronicle of the President's years in office Verb The book chronicles the events that led to the American Civil War. She intends to chronicle the broad social changes that have occurred in this part of the country. a magazine that chronicles the lives of the rich and famous
Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The chronicle of the Thorpe affair, a doomed gay love story at a cultural moment when England very much wasn’t ready to deal with such things, gave Hugh Grant and Ben Whishaw room for career-best performances, which is saying a lot. Daniel Fienberg, The Hollywood Reporter, 21 Apr. 2022 The paperback edition of the third volume of Karl Ove Knausgaard’s epic life chronicle, My Struggle, weighs 14 ounces. Outside Online, 28 Mar. 2022 Divided into three seemingly distinct sections, positioned a hundred years apart, the book is one-part historical fiction (set in 1893), part present-ish-day chronicle (1993), and part futuristic sci-fi story (2093). Chloe Schama, Vogue, 20 Dec. 2021 Few details were initially released, but charging documents made public Monday chronicle the events that led up to the fight and the subsequent statewide alert. Carol Robinson | Crobinson@al.com, al, 22 Nov. 2021 BEAVER DAM - Black and white photographs tacked to bare studs in John Butterbrodt's basement chronicle his last 93 years. Corrinne Hess, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 19 Apr. 2022 The story beyond the iconic music, an intimate and empathetic chronicle featuring never-before-seen footage from 21 years in the life of a captivating figure. Brent Lang, Variety, 9 Dec. 2021 The story beyond the iconic music, an intimate and empathetic chronicle featuring never-before-seen footage from 21 years in the life of a captivating figure. Natalie Lin, Vulture, 9 Dec. 2021 The story beyond the iconic music, an intimate and empathetic chronicle featuring never-before-seen footage from 21 years in the life of a captivating figure. Mary Sollosi, EW.com, 9 Dec. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The new series takes place 200 years before the events of the Emmy-winning Game of Thrones and will chronicle the heyday of the Targaryen empire in Westeros. Nick Romano, EW.com, 30 Mar. 2022 What went into your decision to chronicle the lives of Peggy and her family, who are affluent and part of a Black upper class living in Brooklyn? Brent Lang, Variety, 21 Mar. 2022 The more decidedly rock tune, build over an ominous, brooding track appears to chronicle the dimmer side of drinking, as Malone sings about losing teeth, and some of his dignity, while hitting the bottle. Gil Kaufman, Billboard, 25 Apr. 2022 Huneven’s novels, all set in Southern California, which chronicle middle-class professionals forced to deal with crises of authenticity and integrity. Dan Cryer, Los Angeles Times, 19 Apr. 2022 The developing project is said to chronicle Clinton’s life and legacy, from his childhood in 1940s North Carolina, to the formation of his groundbreaking bands Parliament and Funkadelic in the late 1960s. Angelique Jackson, Variety, 31 Mar. 2022 And there are many, many photos of Kahlo, in both color and black and white, that chronicle her life, her loves, her look, her home and her art. oregonlive, 12 Mar. 2022 Nationally, two of the three major databases that chronicle police violence in the U.S. saw increases in the number of fatal police shootings last year, said Justin Nix, a criminology professor at the University of Nebraska Omaha. Paighten Harkins, The Salt Lake Tribune, 21 Jan. 2022 Now Ratajkowski, 30, is reclaiming her narrative with My Body, a new book of essays that chronicle her awakening and search for wholeness. Seija Rankin, EW.com, 9 Nov. 2021 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'chronicle.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of chronicle

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for chronicle

Noun

Middle English cronycle, borrowed from Anglo-French cronike, cronicle (-le perhaps by assimilation to words with the suffix -icle, as article article entry 1), borrowed from Latin chronica "book of annals," borrowed from Greek () chroniká, (hai) chronikaí, from plural of chronikós "of time, temporal, in order by time" (with a noun such as biblía "books" or graphaí "writings" understood) — more at chronic

Verb

Middle English cronyclen, verbal derivative of cronycle chronicle entry 1

Learn More About chronicle

Time Traveler for chronicle

Time Traveler

The first known use of chronicle was in the 14th century

See more words from the same century

Dictionary Entries Near chronicle

chronic fatigue syndrome

chronicle

chronicle drama

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Statistics for chronicle

Last Updated

18 May 2022

Cite this Entry

“Chronicle.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/chronicle. Accessed 27 May. 2022.

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More Definitions for chronicle

chronicle

noun
chron·​i·​cle | \ ˈkrä-ni-kəl How to pronounce chronicle (audio) \

Kids Definition of chronicle

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: an account of events in the order that they happened : history

chronicle

verb
chronicled; chronicling

Kids Definition of chronicle (Entry 2 of 2)

: to record in the order of occurrence This chapter chronicles the events leading to the American Revolution.

More from Merriam-Webster on chronicle

Nglish: Translation of chronicle for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of chronicle for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about chronicle

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