chronicle

noun
chron·​i·​cle | \ ˈkrä-ni-kəl \

Definition of chronicle

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a historical account of events arranged in order of time usually without analysis or interpretation a chronicle of the Civil War
2 : narrative sense 1 a chronicle of the struggle against drug traffickers

chronicle

verb
chronicled; chronicling\ ˈkrä-​ni-​k(ə-​)liŋ \

Definition of chronicle (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to present a record of in or as if in a chronicle chronicle Victorian society chronicle the doings of the rich and famous

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Other Words from chronicle

Verb

chronicler \ ˈkrä-​ni-​k(ə-​)lər \ noun

Examples of chronicle in a Sentence

Noun

a chronicle of the American Civil War a chronicle of the President's years in office

Verb

The book chronicles the events that led to the American Civil War. She intends to chronicle the broad social changes that have occurred in this part of the country. a magazine that chronicles the lives of the rich and famous
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Image An eye-opening chronicle of French dining from 1846 has just been fully translated into English. Florence Fabricant, New York Times, "A Glimpse Into Parisian Dining Life," 25 June 2018 This latest biography of Williams is an engaging and intimate chronicle of the cultural icon who took America by storm 40 years ago. David Holahan, USA TODAY, "The sad, funny, tragic life of Robin Williams (and why Pam Dawber forgives him): Review," 14 May 2018 This haunting, lightly fictionalized chronicle provides strikingly authentic evocations of the tension, shock and fear of battle. Robert Kershaw, WSJ, "Five Best: Robert Kershaw on the Best Accounts of D-Day," 14 Dec. 2018 Below, a brief chronicle of the women who spoke truth to power this year and rocked the status quo. Mattie Kahn, Glamour, "9 Times Being a Woman in 2018 Was Genuinely Powerful," 30 Oct. 2018 This intermittently rousing procedural chronicles how the news company took a skeptical stance toward the Bush administration’s case for war. Ben Kenigsberg, New York Times, "Review: In ‘Shock and Awe,’ Journalists Expose Gaps in Case for Iraq War," 12 July 2018 This is a book that bills itself as a chronicle of your fortieth year—a year in which many people relied on you to get them through life-changing events. Chloe Schama, Vogue, "Glynnis MacNicol's No One Tells You This Puts a Happy Single Woman at the Center," 16 July 2018 The most significant exceptions to this dismal chronicle are Jonathan Wainwright and Robert Spenser. Mike Fischer, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "This 'King Lear' more humdrum than tragic," 6 July 2018 Only once a year men step in to separate the young stallions from the herd, that was first mentioned in chronicles 700 years ago. Washington Post, "AP PHOTOS: German wranglers corral wild stallions," 27 May 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Born in Tehran and educated in the U.S. and France, Ms. Batmanglij has spent the last 35 years living in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C., chronicling Iranian cooking and customs. Louisa Shafia, WSJ, "How To Be a Happy and Relaxed Host," 10 Jan. 2019 Here’s a thread by Daniella Zalcman of Women Photograph chronicling the gender disparity in Year in Pictures galleries — overall the numbers are frustratingly grim. Kainaz Amaria, Vox, "2018, explained in pictures by women and non-binary photographers," 21 Dec. 2018 Innovators' chronicles our treks behind the scenes with travel's disruptors and free thinkers—the people who lead rather than follow, who break things, take risks, solve problems in fresh ways. Barbara Peterson, Condé Nast Traveler, "JetBlue Founder David Neeleman on How New Airline Moxy Will Change the Way We Fly," 12 Dec. 2018 The regulars have feverish followings online, where fans chronicle their movements and histories. Karin Brulliard, The Seattle Times, "America’s fattest bear has now been crowned," 9 Oct. 2018 The 1953-55 summers all featured record 11-day runs of 90-degree-plus heat and chronicled 42, 36 and 46 days of 90 degrees or higher, respectively. Tom Skilling, chicagotribune.com, "Ask Tom: Were 3 consecutive summers in the 1950s the city's hottest?," 14 July 2018 The movie, out in limited release July 13, chronicles the last two weeks of middle school for Kayla (Elsie Fisher), a budding YouTuber. Rebecca Farley, refinery29.com, "The Stars Of Eighth Grade Relive Their Middle School Horror Stories," 13 July 2018 The Queen, though, found time for more lighthearted events, as chronicled by LIFE Magazine, including a state dinner, a visit to Jamestown, Va.—site of the first British settlement in America—and her first American college football game. Ciara Nugent, Time, "Here's How Every Meeting Between the Queen and a U.S. President Went," 12 July 2018 The Teopanzolco site originated with the Tlahuica civilization, which founded the city of Cuauhnahuac (today known as Cuernavaca) around 1200, as G. William Hood chronicles for Viva Cuernavaca. Meilan Solly, Smithsonian, "Earthquake Reveals 12th-Century Temple Hidden Within Aztec Pyramid," 12 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'chronicle.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of chronicle

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for chronicle

Noun and Verb

Middle English cronicle, from Anglo-French, alteration of chronike, from Latin chronica, from Greek chronika, from neuter plural of chronikos — see chronic

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Statistics for chronicle

Last Updated

16 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for chronicle

The first known use of chronicle was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for chronicle

chronicle

noun

English Language Learners Definition of chronicle

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a description of events in the order that they happened

chronicle

verb

English Language Learners Definition of chronicle (Entry 2 of 2)

: to describe a series of events in the order that they happened

chronicle

noun
chron·​i·​cle | \ ˈkrä-ni-kəl \

Kids Definition of chronicle

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: an account of events in the order that they happened : history

chronicle

verb
chronicled; chronicling

Kids Definition of chronicle (Entry 2 of 2)

: to record in the order of occurrence This chapter chronicles the events leading to the American Revolution.

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Comments on chronicle

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