chronicle

noun
chron·​i·​cle | \ ˈkrä-ni-kəl How to pronounce chronicle (audio) \

Definition of chronicle

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a historical account of events arranged in order of time usually without analysis or interpretation a chronicle of the Civil War
2 : narrative sense 1 a chronicle of the struggle against drug traffickers

chronicle

verb
chronicled; chronicling\ ˈkrä-​ni-​k(ə-​)liŋ How to pronounce chronicle (audio) \

Definition of chronicle (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to present a record of in or as if in a chronicle chronicle Victorian society chronicle the doings of the rich and famous

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Other Words from chronicle

Verb

chronicler \ ˈkrä-​ni-​k(ə-​)lər How to pronounce chronicle (audio) \ noun

Examples of chronicle in a Sentence

Noun a chronicle of the American Civil War a chronicle of the President's years in office Verb The book chronicles the events that led to the American Civil War. She intends to chronicle the broad social changes that have occurred in this part of the country. a magazine that chronicles the lives of the rich and famous
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun It was born, like Rolling Stone, from the counterculture of the late 1960s and was created to chronicle and reflect its evolution — and celebrate it — smashing up politics and dress and the politics of dress with a sly sense of fun. New York Times, "The Magazine That Invented Street Style," 21 Apr. 2021 Locals’ photos and video footage chronicle the city’s familiar sights—the Golden Gate Bridge, Oracle Park, undeterred commuter traffic flowing down the highways—rendered alien and vaguely hostile by the persimmon glow. Kelsey Rexroat, The New Yorker, "The Day the San Francisco Sky Turned Orange," 20 Apr. 2021 The often cringe-inducing chronicle of the aspiring, neurotic rapper who can't stop oversharing about his underwhelming qualities is slated to return on June 16 at 10 p.m. on FXX with two episodes and stream the next day on FX on Hulu. Gil Kaufman, Billboard, "Season Two of Lil Dicky's 'Dave' to Feature Lil Nas X, Hailey Bieber, Kendall Jenner," 20 Apr. 2021 Projects on the 20201 Oscars ballot chronicle Black strife and resilience and speak to Black creativity, beauty, and unity. Keyaira Boone, Essence, "11 Films To Watch Before The Oscars On April 25," 19 Apr. 2021 While Atlantic Crossing has been compared to Netflix's The Crown, a multi-season chronicle of Queen Elizabeth's reign, the Masterpiece PBS series was always planned to be one season, and tells a complete story. Caroline Hallemann, Town & Country, "Will Atlantic Crossing Get a Season 2?," 12 Apr. 2021 Footage recorded by passengers and crew provide an intimate chronicle of events. Tribune News Service, cleveland, "Christopher Meloni’s return to ‘SVU’ and ‘Snowpiercer’ finale top this week’s TV picks," 28 Mar. 2021 This is the third film in Lifetime’s chronicle of their love story. Zoe Haylock, Vulture, "Lifetime to Cover Harry and Meghan’s Royal Exit in a Third Film," 24 Mar. 2021 To better chronicle Avicii’s career, Mosesson also retraced some of Bergling’s global journey, venturing from Stockholm, Sweden, to EDM hotspots like Miami, Ibiza, and Los Angeles. Jon Blistein, Rolling Stone, "Avicii Biography to Be Published in November," 6 Apr. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Jordan shares some excellent tales, some from his childhood that highlight his family and others that chronicle his life in Hollywood. Rebecca Angel Baer, Southern Living, "Leslie Jordan Shares How Debbie Reynolds Once Called His Mama in New Book, How Y'all Doing?," 28 Apr. 2021 Does Caitlyn Jenner already have a reality show lined up that will chronicle her campaign for governor? Zachary B. Wolf And Maeve Reston, CNN, "What Caitlyn Jenner's launch means for the brewing California recall," 24 Apr. 2021 But 15 residents vowed to stay and rebuild the village, and Hiroko Masuike, a New York Times photographer and Japanese native, traveled twice a year from New York over the past decade to chronicle their efforts. New York Times, "A Destroyed Village and 10 Years of Hope," 8 Apr. 2021 Parler was used by supporters of former President Donald Trump to plan and chronicle the attack and hosted calls for civil war as Trump urged his followers to march on the Capitol. Jessica Guynn, USA TODAY, "'Huge win for free speech,' Parler may soon return to iPhones, Apple App Store," 20 Apr. 2021 His lawyers’ regular updates chronicle his steady physical decline. Masha Gessen, The New Yorker, "Why Alexey Navalny Returned to Russia," 13 Apr. 2021 The aim is not to chronicle a history of South Asian art—there is no chronological order or mention of, say, the Company School or the Progressive Artists Group. Lee Lawrence, WSJ, "Retelling the Story of a Subcontinent," 10 Apr. 2021 The books, which are untitled at the moment, will chronicle Pence's faith and his time as a public servant. Mike Brest, Washington Examiner, "Pence to write two-part autobiography published by Simon & Schuster," 7 Apr. 2021 The album and the documentary, Michael D. Ratner, chronicle the story of Lovato’s near-fatal overdose in 2018 and her subsequent path to healing. Emily Zemler, Rolling Stone, "Hear Demi Lovato’s Vulnerable New Song ‘Dancing With the Devil’," 26 Mar. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'chronicle.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of chronicle

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for chronicle

Noun

Middle English cronycle, borrowed from Anglo-French cronike, cronicle (-le perhaps by assimilation to words with the suffix -icle, as article article entry 1), borrowed from Latin chronica "book of annals," borrowed from Greek () chroniká, (hai) chronikaí, from plural of chronikós "of time, temporal, in order by time" (with a noun such as biblía "books" or graphaí "writings" understood) — more at chronic

Verb

Middle English cronyclen, verbal derivative of cronycle chronicle entry 1

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Time Traveler for chronicle

Time Traveler

The first known use of chronicle was in the 14th century

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Statistics for chronicle

Last Updated

6 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Chronicle.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/chronicle. Accessed 10 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for chronicle

chronicle

noun

English Language Learners Definition of chronicle

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a description of events in the order that they happened

chronicle

verb

English Language Learners Definition of chronicle (Entry 2 of 2)

: to describe a series of events in the order that they happened

chronicle

noun
chron·​i·​cle | \ ˈkrä-ni-kəl How to pronounce chronicle (audio) \

Kids Definition of chronicle

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: an account of events in the order that they happened : history

chronicle

verb
chronicled; chronicling

Kids Definition of chronicle (Entry 2 of 2)

: to record in the order of occurrence This chapter chronicles the events leading to the American Revolution.

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Comments on chronicle

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