chanteuse

noun

chan·​teuse shan-ˈtüz How to pronounce chanteuse (audio) shäⁿ-ˈtərz How to pronounce chanteuse (audio)
-ˈtəz
plural chanteuses shan-ˈtüz How to pronounce chanteuse (audio)
-ˈtü-zəz,
-ˈtərz,
-ˈtəz,
-ˈtər-zəz,
-ˈtə-zəz
: songstress
especially : a woman who is a concert or nightclub singer

Example Sentences

Recent Examples on the Web For an actress traditionally known as a blonde chanteuse, Monroe actually made a surprising amount of noir films, including this thriller. Maureen Lee Lenker, EW.com, 28 Sep. 2022 The ignition of her libido, triggered by her meeting the juke-joint chanteuse Shug Avery (a seductively on-target Danielle J. Summons), liberates Payton’s persona: The shoulders relax, the mask of servile pain falls away. Peter Marks, Washington Post, 25 Aug. 2022 An aspiring chanteuse, Angel has been dumped by her boyfriend and has found enough alcohol to drown her sorrows — and then some. Matthew J. Palm, Orlando Sentinel, 14 Sep. 2022 Following the red-haired chanteuse, drag superstar Symone electrified her audience. Ian Malone, Vogue, 10 Sep. 2022 Over minimalist piano that channels Julee Cruise, Lana Del Rey or your favorite smoky chanteuse, Pugh repeats the song’s title, following the piano line. Jason Newman, Rolling Stone, 23 Sep. 2022 As Gruff infers, Cate Le Bon on Reward sounds a bit like Nico, the Velvet Underground chanteuse, fronting a band led by Brian Eno and creating music that playfully pushes the boundaries of pop. Daniel De Visé, SPIN, 13 Sep. 2022 The oldest piece in this issue, by A. J. Liebling, is an encounter with the chanteuse Edith Piaf in 1947. Michael Schulman, The New Yorker, 21 Aug. 2022 Tryon erected a statue of the hometown chanteuse downtown on South Trade Street, lined with art and craft galleries. Andrew Nelson, WSJ, 19 May 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'chanteuse.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

Word History

Etymology

borrowed from French, from chanter "to sing" (going back to Old French) + -euse, feminine agent suffix, from feminine of -eux, adjective suffix, going back to Old French -eus, earlier -os, -ous, going back to Latin -ōsus -ose entry 1 — more at chant entry 1

Note: The feminine adjectival suffix -euse developed into an agent suffix in later Middle French, when, in line with the general loss of final consonants, the agent suffix -eur lost its consonant and became completely homonymous with the masculine adjectival suffix -eux; the two suffixes being identified, -euse came into use as a feminine complement to -eur. The restoration of final r in the suffix -eur has once again separated the suffixes.

First Known Use

1823, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of chanteuse was in 1823

Dictionary Entries Near chanteuse

Cite this Entry

“Chanteuse.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/chanteuse. Accessed 5 Dec. 2022.

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