cervical

adjective
cer·​vi·​cal | \ ˈsər-vi-kəl How to pronounce cervical (audio) \

Definition of cervical

: of or relating to a neck or cervix

Examples of cervical in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web And more recently, Japan stopped recommending the human papillomavirus, or HPV, vaccine after media reports of alleged side effects, renewing worries despite the vaccine’s widespread use overseas as safe and effective protection for cervical cancer. Mari Yamaguchi, The Christian Science Monitor, "Japan rolls out vaccination drive. Too late for the Olympics?," 17 Feb. 2021 Screenings for breast and cervical cancers dropped by 94 percent. Anna Goshua, Scientific American, "The Pandemic Is Delaying Cancer Screenings and Detection," 24 Dec. 2020 So do most other vaccine-preventable diseases, including measles, tuberculosis, and cervical cancer. Ed Yong, The Atlantic, "Pandemic Year Two," 29 Dec. 2020 Like the Tuskegee Syphilis Study, Henrietta Lacks, who died in 1951 of cervical cancer, reflects the profiteering of Black bodies in the name of the advancement of science. Dezimey Kum, Time, "Fueled by a History of Mistreatment, Black Americans Distrust the New COVID-19 Vaccines," 28 Dec. 2020 One example is the HPV vaccine, a drug that can prevent cervical cancer but is in short supply in South Africa. New York Times, "For Covid-19 Vaccines, Some Are Too Rich — and Too Poor," 28 Dec. 2020 Discussing the historical lack of transparency, Gregory recalled Henrietta Lacks, a Black woman with terminal cervical cancer whose cells were taken without her knowledge in 1951 and used for medical advancement. Amy Huschka, Detroit Free Press, "Mayor Duggan gets COVID-19 vaccine shot, outlines Detroit's deployment plan," 22 Dec. 2020 Lacks, who lived in Baltimore County’s Turner Station, was treated at Johns Hopkins Hospital for cervical cancer and died from the disease in 1951. Tribune News Service, oregonlive, "Henrietta Lacks, a Black woman whose cells were stolen, leading to medical advances, finally gets measure of recognition," 19 Dec. 2020 Lacks, who lived in Turner Station, was treated at Johns Hopkins Hospital for cervical cancer, and died from the disease in 1951. Pamela Wood, baltimoresun.com, "Federal cancer research bill named for Henrietta Lacks wins final approval," 19 Dec. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cervical.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of cervical

1668, in the meaning defined above

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Time Traveler for cervical

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The first known use of cervical was in 1668

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Statistics for cervical

Last Updated

27 Feb 2021

Cite this Entry

“Cervical.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cervical. Accessed 2 Mar. 2021.

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More Definitions for cervical

cervical

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of cervical

medical
: of or relating to a cervix of the uterus
: of or relating to the neck

cervical

adjective
cer·​vi·​cal | \ ˈsər-vi-kəl, British usually sər-ˈvī-kəl \

Medical Definition of cervical

: of or relating to a neck or cervix cervical cancer

More from Merriam-Webster on cervical

Nglish: Translation of cervical for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of cervical for Arabic Speakers

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