catapult

noun
cat·​a·​pult | \ ˈka-tə-ˌpəlt How to pronounce catapult (audio) , -ˌpu̇lt\

Definition of catapult

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : an ancient military device for hurling missiles
2 : a device for launching an airplane at flying speed (as from an aircraft carrier)

catapult

verb
catapulted; catapulting; catapults

Definition of catapult (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to throw or launch by or as if by a catapult

intransitive verb

: to become catapulted he catapulted to fame

Illustration of catapult

Illustration of catapult

Noun

catapult 1

In the meaning defined above

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Examples of catapult in a Sentence

Verb They catapulted rocks toward the castle. The publicity catapulted her CD to the top of the charts. The novel catapulted him from unknown to best-selling author. He catapulted to fame after his first book was published. Her career was catapulting ahead.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Protesters displayed laser pointers and burned spirit paper in recognition of the lunar calendar's traditional Hungry Ghost Festival, but police spokesman Tse Chun-chung said some also used catapults to fire metal balls and marbles at police. Fox News, "Chinese diplomat warns Beijing ‘will not sit on its hands’; military runs drills near Hong Kong border," 15 Aug. 2019 Experts attributed its catapult to seventh place as partly influenced by a shift in how data researchers compiled the final list. Marissa J. Lang, Washington Post, "D.C. ranks No. 7 on list of the world’s safest large cities," 30 Aug. 2019 Participants will have the opportunity to program one of the world’s smallest robots, make instruments and LED bracelets, fly gliders and launch catapults. Houston Chronicle, "Family Fun: ‘In a Pickle Festival,’ ‘9/11 Heroes Run’," 5 Sep. 2019 Sometimes, instead of catapults or trebuchets, the attacking army would use miners. William Gurstelle, Popular Mechanics, "How to Storm a Castle," 11 Apr. 2019 For Boy Scout age youth (boys ages 11–17) Troop 513 will teach the basics of knot tying and guide the boys in building pencil catapults followed by cooking Dutch oven desserts. Sam Boyer, cleveland.com, "There’s nothing quite like parenting a 3-year-old: Whit & Whimsey," 25 July 2019 Equally predictably, the white knights of outrage launch their counterassault catapults toward an overbroad range of targets and inflict extensive collateral damage. Danielle Allen, Twin Cities, "Danielle Allen: Don’t fall into Trump’s trap," 23 July 2019 Other activities include make-your-own bubble mix, a tie-dye station, testing of the properties of different slime recipes and paint-ball catapults. Susan Dunne, courant.com, "Ooey, gooey, slimy, grimy: It’s a 2-day Mess Fest for kids at CT Science Center," 19 June 2019 And often, from inside the walls, great stone balls would answer back from the defender's own catapults, aimed directly at the attacker's stone throwers. William Gurstelle, Popular Mechanics, "How to Storm a Castle," 11 Apr. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Endorsements from big names like Elon Musk, along with many small individual donations from software engineers — among the biggest givers to his campaign — have catapulted him into the middle of the winnowing pack of remaining Democratic candidates. BostonGlobe.com, "Andrew Yang brings Silicon Valley’s upstart spirit to 2020 bid - The Boston Globe," 13 Sep. 2019 Endorsements from big names like Elon Musk, along with many small individual donations from software engineers—among the biggest givers to his campaign—have catapulted him into the middle of the winnowing pack of remaining Democratic candidates. Fortune, "Can Andrew Yang Win in 2020? Inside His Unorthodox Campaign," 12 Sep. 2019 His end-of-season performances have catapulted the Belgian striker from relative obscurity to worldwide acclaim, which Origi discovered during the Reds' tour of America this summer. SI.com, "Divock Origi Explains How Champions League Exploits Have Changed How People See Him," 30 July 2019 Our notoriously fast-moving industry has already catapulted itself into a new decade. Nicole Phelps, Vogue, "Fashion Rewind: Why We’re Taking Stock of the 2010s and Where We’re Headed Next," 18 July 2019 The promise of free college has catapulted from the fringe in 2015, when Sen. Bernie Sanders muscled the idea into presidential politics, to an urgent place in the race this year. Evan Halper, latimes.com, "Lots of 2020 candidates are talking about ‘free college.’ Here's what they’re not telling you," 7 June 2019 And the latest Big Ten championship came in 2015 and catapulted the Spartans into the College Football Playoff in its second year of existence. Chris Solari, Detroit Free Press, "On cusp of history, Mark Dantonio still thirsts for greatness at Michigan State," 14 Sep. 2019 His victory quickly became a cultural turning point in Italy’s polarized climate around immigration, drawing scorn from Italy’s leading populist and far-right politicians, and catapulting Mahmood into the national spotlight. Julia Webster, Time, "This Italian-Egyptian Singer Was Attacked By Populist Politicians. His Groundbreaking Success Is Silencing Critics," 11 Sep. 2019 With two wins from their opening two league fixtures, Conte appears to be handling the position well, as victories over Lecce and Cagliari have catapulted the Nerazzurri to the top of Serie A, albeit with the new season only in its infancy. SI.com, "Inter Manager Antonio Conte Revealed as Serie A's Highest Paid Manager Ever," 11 Sep. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'catapult.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of catapult

Noun

1577, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1848, in the meaning defined at transitive sense

History and Etymology for catapult

Noun

Middle French or Latin; Middle French catapulte, from Latin catapulta, from Greek katapaltēs, from kata- + pallein to hurl

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Statistics for catapult

Last Updated

6 Nov 2019

Time Traveler for catapult

The first known use of catapult was in 1577

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More Definitions for catapult

catapult

noun
How to pronounce catapult (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of catapult

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: an ancient weapon used for throwing large rocks
: a device for launching an airplane from the deck of an aircraft carrier

catapult

verb

English Language Learners Definition of catapult (Entry 2 of 2)

: to throw (something) with a catapult
: to cause (someone or something) to quickly move up or ahead or to a better position
: to quickly move up or ahead : to quickly advance to a better position

catapult

noun
cat·​a·​pult | \ ˈka-tə-ˌpəlt How to pronounce catapult (audio) \

Kids Definition of catapult

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : an ancient military machine for hurling stones and arrows
2 : a device for launching an airplane from the deck of a ship

catapult

verb
catapulted; catapulting

Kids Definition of catapult (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to throw by or as if by a catapult She catapulted herself out of the door.— Louise Fitzhugh, Harriet the Spy
2 : to quickly advance The movie role catapulted her to fame.

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Comments on catapult

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