cadence

noun
ca·​dence | \ ˈkā-dᵊn(t)s How to pronounce cadence (audio) \
plural cadences

Definition of cadence

1a : the beat, time, or measure of rhythmical motion or activity The drill sergeant counted cadence. the steady cadence of the drums
b : a rhythmic sequence or flow of sounds in language the grand cadence of his poetry
c : a regular and repeated pattern of activity In addition to our weekly cadence, we take a step back once a quarter to think about our platform a little more strategically.— David Vandegrift To meet its cadence of a launch every other week, SpaceX must build at least two of these each month.— Eric Berger Then in the evening, it's off to the boxing gym or a sparring session for two to three more hours. In recent years, she's kept a cadence of two to four fights annually, her last being a loss for the WBC light middleweight world title in Poland in September.— Deanna Cioppa
2a : a falling inflection of the voice
b : a concluding and usually falling strain specifically : a musical chord sequence moving to a harmonic close or point of rest and giving the sense of harmonic completion
3 : the modulated and rhythmic recurrence of a sound especially in nature

Other Words from cadence

cadenced \ ˈkā-​dᵊn(t)st How to pronounce cadence (audio) \ adjective
cadential \ kā-​ˈden(t)-​shəl How to pronounce cadence (audio) \ adjective

Synonyms for cadence

Synonyms

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Cadence and Music

Falling into the hands of English speakers in the 14th century, cadence derives via Middle English and Old Italian from the Latin verb cadere, meaning "to fall." (Cadere can be found in the history of many common English words, including decay, coincide, and accident.) We most often hear cadence used in contexts pertaining to voice or music—it might refer to the familiar way in which someone speaks, or the rhythms employed by a rap artist, or the rising and falling notes of a bird's call. Cadenza, the Old Italian word that factors into the history of cadence, has its own place in English as well. Cadenza in English usually refers to a brilliant musical flourish played before closing out an aria.

Cadence in the Military

Cadence can refer to any rhythmic sequence of words or sound, but in military contexts, the word has a particular meaning, referring to the rhythmic chants sung by soldiers in marching formation.

These chants can often help keep marchers in line with the rhythm of the march:

Early each morning we were assembled for drill, marching to the cadence of a full-throated Marine sergeant who had little use for us; what he knew for sure about us was that we would be of little value in any hand-to-hand fight.
Lewis Thomas, in Authors at Sea, 1997

Examples of cadence in a Sentence

the steady cadence of the drums Oars moved back and forth in smooth cadence. He speaks with a soft Southern cadence.
Recent Examples on the Web But the culture and low crime rate instill a sense of safety — especially for someone newly arrived from a country with a now-familiar cadence of mass shootings and a rise in violent attacks on Asian Americans. Michelle Ye Hee Lee, Washington Post, 21 July 2022 The company hopes to reach a flight cadence of one human mission about every two weeks within the next year or two, a goal that does not seem out of reach. Eric Berger, Ars Technica, 11 July 2022 Provide high-quality, valuable content, and do it on a regular cadence. Expert Panel®, Forbes, 6 July 2022 Many of its shows are now on a weekly release cadence. Andy Meek, BGR, 19 June 2022 Environmentalists worry a steady cadence of Starship launches with blasts of thunderous noise and rocket exhaust as well as potential explosive mishaps will disrupt the ecosystem. Kenneth Chang, New York Times, 13 June 2022 Most critically for companies such as Cineworld, the releases are coming at a steady cadence, as opposed to the first half of the year, when big debuts were followed by weeks of empty auditoriums. Erich Schwartzel, WSJ, 30 May 2022 Since nearly every person on the Bulls game day bench received a positive test or a booster shot in the last three months, most of the team weren’t in a regular testing cadence entering the postseason. Julia Poe, chicagotribune.com, 15 Apr. 2022 For Blue Origin, which also runs its space tourism flights on New Shepard rockets from West Texas and is working on plans for a commercial space station called Orbital Reef, the contract gives New Glenn a steady cadence of work. Richard Tribou, orlandosentinel.com, 5 Apr. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'cadence.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of cadence

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1b

History and Etymology for cadence

Middle English, "rhythm of prose or verse, rhetorical periods," borrowed from Medieval Latin cadentia "rhythm in verse," noun derivative (formally feminine singular from neuter plural) of Latin cadent-, cadens, present participle of cadere "to fall, sound rhythmically, end, terminate (of words or clauses)" — more at chance entry 1

Note: Since at least the first edition of the Oxford English Dictionary (1888), this word has been attributed to Italian, either directly or through French. However, attestations of French cadence and Italian cadenza are significantly later than the first occurrences of cadence in Middle English (ca. 1390) and early Scots (ca. 1420). (The word also occurs in Chaucer's House of Fame, composed ca. 1380 and attested earliest in a manuscript of ca. 1450.) In Medieval Latin cadentia appears in the approximate sense "verse rhythm" (pedum cadentia) in John of Garland's Parisiana poetria (composed ca. 1234).

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cadence

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Last Updated

3 Aug 2022

Cite this Entry

“Cadence.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cadence. Accessed 10 Aug. 2022.

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More Definitions for cadence

cadence

noun
ca·​dence | \ ˈkā-dᵊns How to pronounce cadence (audio) \

Kids Definition of cadence

: a regular beat or rhythm We heard the steady cadence of the drums.

More from Merriam-Webster on cadence

Nglish: Translation of cadence for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of cadence for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about cadence

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