buzzkill

noun
buzz·​kill | \ ˈbəz-ˌkil How to pronounce buzzkill (audio) \

Definition of buzzkill

: one that has a depressing or negative effect

Examples of buzzkill in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Notre Dame Stadium public address announcer Mike Collins spent about 30 minutes after the game encouraging fans to leave the field and stadium safely, while not trying to be a buzzkill. Ralph D. Russo, orlandosentinel.com, "Notre Dame rallies to upset Clemson in double overtime," 8 Nov. 2020 But Miami leaders have imposed a midnight curfew — a real buzzkill for a scene that doesn’t even get started until the a.m. hours — and are restricting loud music so that people don’t have to shout and risk spreading the virus through their spittle. Kelli Kennedy, orlandosentinel.com, "Glamorous Miami club caught in power struggle over coronavirus," 19 Oct. 2020 But the Cowboys overcame a 15-point deficit in the final 7:57 to avoid an 0-2 start and serious buzzkill to open the Mike McCarthy era. David Moore, Dallas News, "The Cowboys had no business winning vs. Falcons. That is, until Dak Prescott changed the narrative.," 20 Sep. 2020 Those stats are a buzzkill to environmental dreaming for sure. David Holahan, USA TODAY, "'The New Map': Daniel Yergin's sobering and smart take on the global state of energy," 14 Sep. 2020 Then came the buzzkill: This original map won’t be good for much longer, cosmically speaking. National Geographic, "NASA sent a map to space to help aliens find Earth. Now it needs an update.," 10 Sep. 2020 Watching the up and down, up and down of the crowd was a bit like watching an outdoor version of the State of the Union address without the buzzkill of Democrats who refuse to play along. Robin Givhan, Washington Post, "Trump’s convention speech was selling a fantasy version of himself," 28 Aug. 2020 For grandparents thinking ahead to reuniting at the holidays, however, Osterholm may be a bit of a buzzkill. Star Tribune, "Minnesota's 'rogue grandparents' are defying CDC recommendations to see their grandkids," 29 July 2020 Having a reed break in the middle of a session is a buzzkill. Parker Hall, Wired, "The Best Gear to Learn Music Like a Pro," 21 June 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'buzzkill.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of buzzkill

1992, in the meaning defined above

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The first known use of buzzkill was in 1992

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Cite this Entry

“Buzzkill.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/buzzkill. Accessed 25 Feb. 2021.

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