burrow

noun
bur·row | \ ˈbər-(ˌ)ō ; ˈbə-(ˌ)rō \

Definition of burrow 

(Entry 1 of 2)

: a hole or excavation in the ground made by an animal (such as a rabbit) for shelter and habitation

burrow

verb
burrowed; burrowing; burrows

Definition of burrow (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 archaic : to hide in or as if in a hole in the ground made by an animal for shelter and habitation : to hide in or as if in a burrow was burrowed in his cave

2a : to construct by tunneling burrowed a dwelling

b : to penetrate by means of a burrow The tunnel burrows its way under the mountain.

3 : to make a motion suggestive of burrowing with : nestle burrows her hand into mine

intransitive verb

1 : to conceal oneself in or as if in a burrow

2a : to make a burrow A fox had burrowed into the side of the hill.

b : to progress by or as if by digging burrowing through a pile of paperwork

3 : to make a motion suggestive of burrowing : snuggle, nestle burrowed against his back for warmth

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Other words from burrow

Verb

burrower noun

Synonyms for burrow

Synonyms: Noun

den, hole, house, lair, lodge

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Examples of burrow in a Sentence

Noun

the chipmunk retreated to its burrow to have its babies

Verb

The rabbit burrowed into the side of the hill. The frogs burrow under the mud. The mole burrowed its way under the ground.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The South Florida Sun Sentinel reported last week that the state is quietly studying a pedestrian bridge near where the U.S. 1 tunnel burrows under the river downtown. Brittany Wallman, Sun-Sentinel.com, "Fort Lauderdale: We don't want New River bridge," 21 June 2018 Many sightings were in the south of France, where, Justine hypothesized, the summers are wet and the winters mild enough for the animals to survive, at least in a burrow. Ben Guarino, BostonGlobe.com, "Giant predatory worms invaded France, but scientists just noticed them," 22 May 2018 The largest burrows, however, were likely made by giant ground sloths, extinct cousins of modern sloths that could grow to more than 1,700 pounds. National Geographic, "6 Amazing Structures Built by Surprising Creatures," 7 May 2018 When Best returned in the late 1980s, the burrows and trails were gone. Marissa Fessenden, Smithsonian, "This Kangaroo Rat Was Just Spotted For the First Time in 30 years," 1 May 2018 In fact, some of these crabs may have had a warm welcome in mind; female ghost crabs initially judge a male’s desirability by his burrow’s entrance. New York Times, "Ghost on the Beach," 28 June 2018 The wasp then wanders off to browse nearby real estate for a suitable burrow, while the cockroach remains rooted in place, engaged in a strange ritual of frenetic preening. Katherine J. Wu, Smithsonian, "Five Real Life Wasp Superpowers Not in Ant-Man and the Wasp," 22 Mar. 2018 Portuallo, of Parkland, says homeowners can control the beasties by regularly inspecting yards for iguana burrows, often found next to seawalls, and collapsing the holes and adding dirt. Ellie Rushing, Sun-Sentinel.com, "Out of control iguanas infesting South Florida," 22 June 2018 During periods of cold weather, rabbits use natural cavities and other animals’ burrows for their dens. Tim Johnson, chicagotribune.com, "Rabbits feasting on your garden? Wire fencing is your friend," 15 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

But the worms can also burrow into human skin and cause a rash before the misguided parasites die. Rachel Becker, The Verge, "There might be poop in the water you’re swimming in so please don’t swallow it, CDC says," 29 June 2018 On top of that, most geologic archives typically can’t resolve time much shorter than a thousand years—and burrowing critters that stir up sediments can smear that signal across thousands of additional years. Scott K. Johnson, Ars Technica, "Are we sure there wasn’t a coal-burning species 55 million years ago?," 23 Apr. 2018 Leafminer larvae can burrow inside leaves and produce tan patches. The Editors Of Organic Life, Good Housekeeping, "How To Grow The Tastiest Spinach," 15 Feb. 2018 Or until someone like Elon Musk, made fabulously wealthy when PayPal was acquired by eBay in 2002, muscles his way back into your consciousness by, for example, launching rockets into space or burrowing tunnels under major American cities. John Herrman, New York Times, "Want to Understand What Ails the Modern Internet? Look at eBay," 20 June 2018 The dry ice is inserted into the rat burrow where rats are living. David Grossman, Popular Mechanics, "Dry Ice Is the Newest Weapon Against Rats," 17 Apr. 2018 On this Saturday morning, the snake rattling somewhere beneath Ellsworth III’s knee-high protective boots is burrowed deep. Jason Nark, Philly.com, "Venomous passion: Pennsylvania's snake hunters head to the hills," 20 June 2018 School's out this week, rats are burrowing in our yards and vacation season is officially here. Detroit Free Press, "Woodward 248: Yes, rats are the worst. So how can we get rid of them?," 8 June 2018 The trackways indicate a connection to burrowing, suggesting that whatever animal this was might have had a habit of digging into sediments and microbial mats. David Grossman, Popular Mechanics, "Scientists Discover Oldest Animal Footprints Found on Earth," 7 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'burrow.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of burrow

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined above

Verb

1596, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

History and Etymology for burrow

Noun

Middle English borow

Verb

see burrow entry 1

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Statistics for burrow

Last Updated

24 Sep 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for burrow

The first known use of burrow was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for burrow

burrow

noun

English Language Learners Definition of burrow

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a hole or tunnel in the ground that an animal (such as a rabbit or fox) makes to live in or for safety

burrow

verb

English Language Learners Definition of burrow (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make a hole or tunnel in the ground by digging

: to move or press under, through, or into something

burrow

noun
bur·row | \ ˈbər-ō \

Kids Definition of burrow

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a hole in the ground made by an animal (as a rabbit or fox) for shelter or protection

burrow

verb
burrowed; burrowing

Kids Definition of burrow (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to hide in or as if in a burrow … she burrowed face downward into the pillow … —Lucy Maud Montgomery, Anne of Green Gables

2 : to make a burrow

3 : to proceed by or as if by digging He burrowed through his suitcase.

burrow

noun
bur·row | \ ˈbər-(ˌ)ō, ˈbə-(ˌ)rō \

Medical Definition of burrow 

: a passage or gallery formed in or under the skin by the wandering of a parasite (as the mite of scabies or a foreign hookworm)

Other words from burrow

burrow verb

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to deposit or conceal in a hiding place

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