brooch

noun
\ ˈbrōch How to pronounce brooch (audio) also ˈbrüch \

Definition of brooch

: an ornament that is held by a pin or clasp and is worn at or near the neck

Examples of brooch in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web The Queen wearing a cream and yellow floral Angela Kelly dress with the Cullinan V diamond brooch, while Philip wore a Household Division tie. Maria Puente, USA TODAY, "Prince Philip turns 99: The Queen's husband marks a historic birthday in no-fuss way," 11 June 2020 There was a jaunty red scarf around her neck, pinned with a large jeweled brooch. Seija Rankin, EW.com, "Preview Jennifer Weiner's Big Summer, the newest novel from the queen of beach reads," 5 May 2020 The brooch has reportedly been sent to the Collection Museum in Lincoln and will go on display there. Fox News, "Rare ancient Roman horse brooch discovered by scientists," 5 Mar. 2020 On her: Louis Vuitton shirt, $2,210, vest, $2,760, skort, $3,450, brooch, price upon request, and belt, $750, louisvuitton.com, Stetson hat, $245, stetson.com, Church’s boots, $1,150, church-footwear.com. WSJ, "Photos: American Fashion Rides Again," 20 Apr. 2020 Kate also a poppy brooch for today’s outing to symbolize Remembrance Day. Stephanie Petit, PEOPLE.com, "Kate Middleton Chose a Very Special Accessory to Complete Her All-Blue Look at Charity Launch," 7 Nov. 2019 There also was an exhibition of his work, mostly brooches in a materials ranging from 24-karat gold to egg shells. Tanya Dukes, New York Times, "On Broadway, the Art of Adornment," 10 Feb. 2020 Could the Queen, who has been known to strategically communicate via brooches in the past, be sending a message through her styling choices? Jenny Hollander, Marie Claire, "Who Is the Maybe-Corgi in Queen Elizabeth's Backseat: An Investigation," 10 Jan. 2020 My interest is piqued by shiny objects: In my pockets are brass buttons, pressed coins, old brooches. Sophie Dahl, New York Times, "Letter of Recommendation: Mudlarking," 1 Apr. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'brooch.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of brooch

13th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for brooch

Middle English broche "pointed instrument, brooch" — more at broach entry 1

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Time Traveler for brooch

Time Traveler

The first known use of brooch was in the 13th century

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Statistics for brooch

Last Updated

26 Jun 2020

Cite this Entry

“Brooch.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/brooch. Accessed 13 Jul. 2020.

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More Definitions for brooch

brooch

noun
How to pronounce brooch (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of brooch

: a piece of jewelry that is held on clothing by a pin and worn by a woman at or near her neck

brooch

noun
\ ˈbrōch How to pronounce brooch (audio) , ˈbrüch \

Kids Definition of brooch

: a piece of jewelry fastened to clothing with a pin

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More from Merriam-Webster on brooch

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with brooch

Spanish Central: Translation of brooch

Nglish: Translation of brooch for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of brooch for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about brooch

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