brandish

verb
bran·​dish | \ ˈbran-dish \
brandished; brandishing; brandishes

Definition of brandish

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to shake or wave (something, such as a weapon) menacingly brandished a knife at them
2 : to exhibit in an ostentatious or aggressive manner brandishing her intellect

brandish

noun

Definition of brandish (Entry 2 of 2)

: an act or instance of waving something menacingly or exhibiting something ostentatiously or aggressively : an act or instance of brandishing

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Choose the Right Synonym for brandish

Verb

swing, wave, flourish, brandish, thrash mean to wield or cause to move to and fro or up and down. swing implies regular or uniform movement. swing the rope back and forth wave usually implies smooth or continuous motion. waving the flag flourish suggests vigorous, ostentatious, graceful movement. flourished the winning lottery ticket brandish implies threatening or menacing motion. brandishing a knife thrash suggests vigorous, abrupt, violent movement. an infant thrashing his arms about

Did You Know?

Verb

Most of the time when we encounter the word brandish in print, it is followed by a word for a weapon, such as "knife" or "handgun." That’s appropriate given the word’s etymology: it derives via Middle English braundisshen from brant, braund, the Anglo-French word for "sword." Nowadays you can brandish things other than weapons, however. The figurative usage of brandish rose alongside its earliest literal usage in the 14th century. When you brandish something that isn’t a weapon (such as a sign), you are in effect waving it in someone’s face so that it cannot be overlooked.

Examples of brandish in a Sentence

Verb

She brandished a stick at the dog. I could see that he was brandishing a knife.

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Two people approached a man demanding property and one of them brandished a firearm. Washington Post, "Alexandria and Arlington crime watch," 2 July 2018 Deshalone Davis, 21, of Gary, pleaded guilty earlier this year to Hobbs Act Robbery and brandishing a firearm during and in relation to a crime of violence. Becky Jacobs, Post-Tribune, "Man sentenced in cellphone store robbery linked to shooting of boy, 15," 20 June 2018 Fox pleaded no contest to brandishing a firearm, a felony, during a confrontation with guests in the complex in 2013. Paul Brinkmann, OrlandoSentinel.com, "Sheriff's office seizes property of MetroWest man who challenged condo association," 30 May 2018 In Oregon, Wafer, 28, Knight, 29, and Kizzee, 27, now face federal charges of kidnapping and conspiracy to brandish a firearm in a crime of violence. Maxine Bernstein, OregonLive.com, "Secret drug raid by feds backfires in Portland: 'Someone could have been killed'," 15 Apr. 2018 Fazeli fled the scene, but was arrested a short time later on charges of felony assault, criminal threats, brandishing a weapon and possession of a switchblade. Samuel Chamberlain, Fox News, "California GOP House candidate used campaign sign to protect himself from knife attacker, investigator says," 11 Sep. 2018 Officers were initially dispatched to Arctic after reports that a man was brandishing a weapon and pointing it at people, police said. Zaz Hollander, Anchorage Daily News, "Police deploy gas in Midtown standoff before arresting armed man," 13 July 2018 Both men pleaded guilty Feb. 1 in the case, Portis to a charge of brandishing a firearm during a violent crime and Brown to a charge of carjacking. Laura Mcknight, NOLA.com, "New Orleans men sentenced in Lower 9th Ward carjacking," 21 May 2018 Miguel Herrera, 32, is accused by authorities of allegedly brandishing a knife at the driver after following him to the station's restroom area on Thursday around 4:40 p.m., according to Sgt. Andy Nguyen, latimes.com, "Bus driver threatened at knifepoint while at Metrolink stop, Burbank police say," 3 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'brandish.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of brandish

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun

1601, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for brandish

Verb and Noun

Middle English braundisshen, from Anglo-French brandiss-, stem of brandir, from brant, braund sword, of Germanic origin; akin to Old English brand

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Statistics for brandish

Last Updated

20 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for brandish

The first known use of brandish was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for brandish

brandish

verb

English Language Learners Definition of brandish

: to wave or swing (something, such as a weapon) in a threatening or excited manner

brandish

verb
bran·​dish | \ ˈbran-dish \
brandished; brandishing

Kids Definition of brandish

: to wave or shake in a threatening manner

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More from Merriam-Webster on brandish

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with brandish

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for brandish

Spanish Central: Translation of brandish

Nglish: Translation of brandish for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of brandish for Arabic Speakers

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